Hot Best Seller

Inkheart

Availability: Ready to download

Author: Cornelia Funke

Published: May 1st 2005 by Scholastic Paperbacks (first published September 23rd 2003)

Format: Paperback , 563 pages

Isbn: 9780439709101

Language: English


Compare

Alternate cover edition: 9780439709101 From internationally acclaimed storyteller Cornelia Funke, this bestselling, magical epic is now out in paperback! One cruel night, Meggie's father reads aloud from a book called INKHEART-- and an evil ruler escapes the boundaries of fiction and lands in their living room. Suddenly, Meggie is smack in the middle of the kind of adventure Alternate cover edition: 9780439709101 From internationally acclaimed storyteller Cornelia Funke, this bestselling, magical epic is now out in paperback! One cruel night, Meggie's father reads aloud from a book called INKHEART-- and an evil ruler escapes the boundaries of fiction and lands in their living room. Suddenly, Meggie is smack in the middle of the kind of adventure she has only read about in books. Meggie must learn to harness the magic that has conjured this nightmare. For only she can change the course of the story that has changed her life forever. This is INKHEART--a timeless tale about books, about imagination, about life. Dare to read it aloud.

30 review for Inkheart

  1. 5 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    Books have to be heavy because the whole world's inside them. Magic, this book is pure unadulterated magic. Meggie and Mo (her father) are a pair. They're two peas in a pod, they're a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, they're ice cream and sprinkles. No matter what - they are together. Mo works as a book binder/restorer and Meggie is a full-time reader - she ready every single moment she's not in school. When a mysterious man from Mo's past shows up on their doorstep, he packs up al Books have to be heavy because the whole world's inside them. Magic, this book is pure unadulterated magic. Meggie and Mo (her father) are a pair. They're two peas in a pod, they're a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, they're ice cream and sprinkles. No matter what - they are together. Mo works as a book binder/restorer and Meggie is a full-time reader - she ready every single moment she's not in school. When a mysterious man from Mo's past shows up on their doorstep, he packs up all of their things and whisks Maggie away to to her Aunt Elinor's house. And, despite all their efforts, evil is circling ever closer to their little family and Maggie is at a complete loss at what to do. She's read countless stories of heroines ... but to actually become one? That will take pure bravery and nerves of steel... There is something inexplicable about the way Funke weaves magic into her novel. Even after all these years, as soon as I read this book, I check the garden for fairies and glassmen. There's something so heartwarming and true regarding the dynamic between Maggie and her father, Mo. Even the crankiness of Eleanor as she begrudgingly takes in Maggie is enough to set my eyes alight as I read, and reread this book. Perhaps, it is because (for the first time) characters in a book loved reading as much as I do When you open a book it's like going to the theater first you see the curtain then it is pulled aside and the show begins. Honestly, every quote in this book just speaks to me: Is there anything in the world better than words on the page? Highly, highly recommended for kids (and adults) of all ages! Audiobook Comments Read by Lynn Redgrave - and she did a rather good job. Nice characterization! YouTube | Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Snapchat @miranda.reads Happy Reading!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I was very much looking forward to reading this, as it had very good word-of-mouth as a high-quality children's/YA fantasy that adults will also enjoy. And the premise, that characters can exist in the "real world" outside of books, or that real people can enter the world inside a book, is endlessly appealing. However, my local library is on the verge of opening a new wing with my overdue book fines on this, because I keep hanging onto it in the hope that eventually I will be able to finish read I was very much looking forward to reading this, as it had very good word-of-mouth as a high-quality children's/YA fantasy that adults will also enjoy. And the premise, that characters can exist in the "real world" outside of books, or that real people can enter the world inside a book, is endlessly appealing. However, my local library is on the verge of opening a new wing with my overdue book fines on this, because I keep hanging onto it in the hope that eventually I will be able to finish reading it. I think it's just not going to happen. First of all, there is something very stilted and anachronistic in the writing, and I can't tell whether that's just Cornelia Funke, or a result of the translation work. Also, the book is simply too long. It takes 150 pages for anything to begin to happen, and that's much too long, even for an adult book. I blame J.K. Rowling for this kind of bloating. Finally, I'm extremely annoyed by people, whether real or fictional, who pat themselves on the back for loving books. People have loved books for as long as there have been books, and even before books, people loved storytelling and drama. You're not a special kind of intellect for loving books and wordplay. The people in Inkheart are paraded before us as people with an extra special super duper love of books that is so powerful that they can cause the boundary between books and reality to melt. But just carrying around favorite books in a little trunk and bragging you've loved books since you were a baby and could read before you could talk and so forth isn't particularly magical or distinctive or worthy of praise, and I got tired pretty quickly of Meggie and her father and aunt and their extreme reverence for books. Capping it off is Funke's annoying habit of using an epigram from other (mostly fantasy) books for each chapter. If she found those inspiring, fine, stick them on your bulletin board while writing. But they were yet more reason to jump out of the story, rather than having it propel along.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    Oy... I really wanted to like this book. I had such high hopes for it. It was one of those books that whenever my students saw me reading it they said, "Oh, I really liked that book! It was so good." So, I thought it would be great. It just wasn't. The story was nice. In short (very short): Meggie's father repairs books. Her mother disappeared nine years ago. After a mysterious visitor shows up at their house, Meggie finds out that her father has a secret. He can read characters out of books. Ni Oy... I really wanted to like this book. I had such high hopes for it. It was one of those books that whenever my students saw me reading it they said, "Oh, I really liked that book! It was so good." So, I thought it would be great. It just wasn't. The story was nice. In short (very short): Meggie's father repairs books. Her mother disappeared nine years ago. After a mysterious visitor shows up at their house, Meggie finds out that her father has a secret. He can read characters out of books. Nine years ago he was reading aloud and read a terrible villian out of the book and simultaneously read Meggie's mother into the book. The rest of the story is Meggie and her father trying to defeat the villian and maybe get her mother back. Overall... it was a great idea for a book, it just wasn't particularly well excecuted. I can't exactly place my finger on what I didn't like, but it just didn't sit well with me. I think it was the lack of character development. I didn't feel like I really knew the characters. I also felt like I couldnt' quite picture what was happening. I wanted more description-strange for such a long novel. And overall, it was just too long. I felt like it really dragged. I wanted it to move more quickly and have a bit more action. Great premise, but I'm not super excited to read the next one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Tintenherz = Inkheart (Inkworld, #1), Cornelia Funke Inkheart is a 2003 young adult fantasy novel by Cornelia Funke, and the first book of the Inkheart trilogy. Meggie, a girl at the age of 12, sees a stranger staring at her outside her window and tells her father, Mortimer (or Mo, as Meggie calls him) about it. Her father invites the stranger in, who introduces himself as Dustfinger. Mo and Dustfinger go to Mo's workshop, where Mo works as a bookbinder. Meggie eavesdrops and hears them talking Tintenherz = Inkheart (Inkworld, #1), Cornelia Funke Inkheart is a 2003 young adult fantasy novel by Cornelia Funke, and the first book of the Inkheart trilogy. Meggie, a girl at the age of 12, sees a stranger staring at her outside her window and tells her father, Mortimer (or Mo, as Meggie calls him) about it. Her father invites the stranger in, who introduces himself as Dustfinger. Mo and Dustfinger go to Mo's workshop, where Mo works as a bookbinder. Meggie eavesdrops and hears them talking about unfamiliar people and places, such as a man named Capricorn. The next morning, Mo unexpectedly announces that he and Meggie have to go to Meggie's Aunt Elinor's house where Mo has to fix some books. They bring along their camper; eventually, they find Dustfinger on the road, who climbs onto the camper to journey with Meggie and Mo to Elinor's house. When they arrive, Elinor seems displeased, but lets them in. Her house, like Mo and Meggie's, is full of books. Mo sets off to work, and Meggie talks much to Dustfinger, where she is introduced to Dustfinger's pet, Gwin, a marten with horns on top of his head. One day, he puts on a show for her at night, claiming to be an entertainer and a fire-eater. A short while after, Mo is captured by people with unusual names, bringing along with him a book, Inkheart, that the previously mentioned Capricorn is desperate to get his hands on. Meggie and Elinor tell the police, but the police just think they are out of their minds. ... عنوانها: قلب جوهری؛ سیاه دل؛ سیاه قلب؛ نویسنده: کورنلیا کارولینه فونکه؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز بیست و چهارم ماه ژانویه سال 2010میلادی عنوان: قلب جوهری - کتاب نخست از سه گانه؛ نویسنده: کورنلیا کارولینه فونکه؛ مترجم محمد نوراللهی؛ تهران، بهنام، 1388؛ در 607ص، مصور، این ترجمه از نسخه ی انگلیسی کتاب ترجمه شده است؛ شابک 9789645668585؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان آلمانی - سده 21م عنوان: سیاه دل - کتاب نخست از سه گانه؛ نویسنده: کورنلیا کارولینه فونکه؛ مترجم شقایق قندهاری؛ تهران، کانون پرورش فکری کودکان و نوجوانان، 1388؛ در 587ص، مصور، این ترجمه از نسخه ی انگلیسی کتاب ترجمه شده است؛ شابک 9789643914103؛ عنوان: سیاه قلب - کتاب نخست از سه گانه؛ نویسنده: کورنلیا کارولینه فونکه؛ مترجم: ؛ تهران، افق، 1391؛ در 595ص، مصور، این ترجمه از نسخه ی انگلیسی کتاب ترجمه شده است؛ شابک 9789643698553؛ سه گانه سیاه قلب: کتاب نخست: سیاه قلب (2003میلادی)؛ کتاب دوم: سیاه خون (2006میلادی)؛ کتاب سوم: سیاه مرگ (2008میلادی)؛ شخصیت داستان «مگی»، دختر شجاعی ست، او دوازده ساله است و شجاعت و قدرتش را از خوانش کتابها با صدای بلند آموخته، و میتواند با شخصیتهای داستانها همذات پنداری کند؛ بهتر است داستان را لو ندهم؛ ا. شربیانی

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patricia (theinfophile)

    This book is everything I ever wanted. It's a book about a book and lovers of books. It's very self-affirming for me. Now I don't feel like a COMPLETE goober for 1) smelling books 2) learning Elvish or 3) bringing at least 5 books with me everywhere I go. Note: just because I don't FEEL like a complete goober, does not mean I am not one. "Inkheart" is the first in a trilogy. "Inkspell" is already out, and "Inkdeath" will be out in 2008. You may not love "Inkheart" in and of itself; however, if you This book is everything I ever wanted. It's a book about a book and lovers of books. It's very self-affirming for me. Now I don't feel like a COMPLETE goober for 1) smelling books 2) learning Elvish or 3) bringing at least 5 books with me everywhere I go. Note: just because I don't FEEL like a complete goober, does not mean I am not one. "Inkheart" is the first in a trilogy. "Inkspell" is already out, and "Inkdeath" will be out in 2008. You may not love "Inkheart" in and of itself; however, if you are a lover of books, I find you will at least appreciate the characters and the sentiments within the pages if not like the story as a whole.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    Honestly one of my favourite fantasy reads. I loved all the characters - even the villians! They were vivid, colourful, the world Cornelia Funke creates is absolutely extraordinary and if it were up to me I would live in the Inkworld for ever! For anyone that likes a good dose of escapism, a book about books, a story that will make you laugh, cry and just generally never want to finish then this is for you! 5 stars!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Enjoyed it well enough. Interesting concept. Good execution. Struck me as a little grim for YA though. By which I mean it's not something I'd read to my boy. (He's fiveish.) I might consider something like this for him when he hits 10 or so.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    What a great story! This is quite the page-turner! I was driven to read more by both the action/adventure and the plot/conclusion. Both are excellently written! Funke’s style of writing (and indeed the translation made by Anthea Bell) makes for a smooth and beautiful read. Wonderfully drawn and very detailed characters fill this book from cover to cover, each character being unique and complete. The story is told from multiple viewpoints, which adds another interesting dimension to the story and p What a great story! This is quite the page-turner! I was driven to read more by both the action/adventure and the plot/conclusion. Both are excellently written! Funke’s style of writing (and indeed the translation made by Anthea Bell) makes for a smooth and beautiful read. Wonderfully drawn and very detailed characters fill this book from cover to cover, each character being unique and complete. The story is told from multiple viewpoints, which adds another interesting dimension to the story and plot. The book doesn’t contain many light-hearted chapters (as you would find in Harry Potter or Narnia) but the wonderful lead characters are such good people that the book is far from dark. The whole idea of the story is beautiful and intriguing! And the quotes that begin each chapter are perfectly chosen. I kept wondering if there were areas that Funke could have taken out to make the book shorter – but I couldn’t really find anything that wouldn’t mar the story in some way, and I was grateful there were as many pages to read as there were! A wonderful read and an interesting story that I think has become a new favorite! *** I've read through chapter 16 now, and things have begun to be explained. The book is so very dear, and so very addicting! I now am not at all concerned with finishing it by the movie's release date!:D *** I plan to begin this book today. I've got so many others that I'm in the midst of reading right now, but the fact that I want to finish this before the movie comes out (eek!) I'd best hurry up and start it!! *** Oh dear!! I'd totally blanked and forgotten that this was being made into a movie!! I saw in the paper today that it's being released in mid-March. While this is wonderful, it means that I'd better hurry up and read it!!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    Oof... it took me 12 days to finish this book. Not like me at all. I liked the storyline. I love the fact that it is a book about books, and that is what initially made me want to read it. I read the blurb on the book and it sounded like a really fun read. I was wrong. The book was VERY long-winded. Whilst the plotline was good, and the characters were nicely built, the actual story dragged on most of the time. The best part of the book is the last few chapters, by which point I didn't care - I jus Oof... it took me 12 days to finish this book. Not like me at all. I liked the storyline. I love the fact that it is a book about books, and that is what initially made me want to read it. I read the blurb on the book and it sounded like a really fun read. I was wrong. The book was VERY long-winded. Whilst the plotline was good, and the characters were nicely built, the actual story dragged on most of the time. The best part of the book is the last few chapters, by which point I didn't care - I just wanted the book to end so I could move onto something more enjoyable. I've given it 2 stars because the story is interesting, I just think that it could have been condensed into less pages. Either that or the writing could have had more cliffhangers - therefore making it more unputdownable. Maybe if I could read German, the original book may be more enticing. It's always possible with translations that the book doesn't end up coming across as the author intended it to. I guess I'll never know. I have no desire whatsoever to read the other books. I think this generally works on its own as a standalone novel, but the thought of reading another 500 pages doesn't fill me with joy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hirdesh

    The best fantasy novel, I'ver read. I was too much curious while reading that. I just loved it. The way writer moves the story. Specially,3 ratings for character making. Thanks Cornelia Funke.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    1. Don't watch the movie. Please, don't watch it, the movie is nothing compared with the books! 2. This series is a must-read for all book-lovers, if you ask me... A father who can awake characters from books just by reading and a daughter with equal abilities. A series about books and reading. A series that offeres exciting adventures, lots of reading, love and friendship, danger, amazing characters and sympathetic villians... What more does a true book-lover need?! Right...Nothing! This is one of 1. Don't watch the movie. Please, don't watch it, the movie is nothing compared with the books! 2. This series is a must-read for all book-lovers, if you ask me... A father who can awake characters from books just by reading and a daughter with equal abilities. A series about books and reading. A series that offeres exciting adventures, lots of reading, love and friendship, danger, amazing characters and sympathetic villians... What more does a true book-lover need?! Right...Nothing! This is one of the best series ever. Read it. And if you already did then re-read it once again! :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Li'l Owl

    Ah! A book about a magical book!! How delightful! Twelve year old Meggie lives in a small farmhouse with her father, Mo, as Meggie calls him, who repairs and restores books. Meggie doesn't think that 'bookbinder' describes the care and love her father takes when he's fixing books and prefers to say that he's a "book doctor." He has a plaque on the bookshop door that reads: Some books should be tasted some devoured but only a few should be chewed and digested thoroughly. One dark and rainy night, Ah! A book about a magical book!! How delightful! Twelve year old Meggie lives in a small farmhouse with her father, Mo, as Meggie calls him, who repairs and restores books. Meggie doesn't think that 'bookbinder' describes the care and love her father takes when he's fixing books and prefers to say that he's a "book doctor." He has a plaque on the bookshop door that reads: Some books should be tasted some devoured but only a few should be chewed and digested thoroughly. One dark and rainy night, a stranger arrives at the door. Mo invites him in, saying he's a "friend" and sends Meggie roughly back to bed. Mo has never treated her that way but more than that, Meggie senses fear, like icy fingers around her heart, and a feeling of foreboding surrounding the visitor. And something else, a familiarity deep down that she can't explain. What kind of friend comes knocking in the middle of the night? Not easily dissuaded, Meggie creeps out of bed and listens through the door. She hears Mo call the visitor Dustfinger who then calls her father Silvertongue. Then the voices become only low murmurs, a hushed argument of sorts. "don't underestimate him" she heard Dustfinger say. "He'd do anything to get hold of it" ..... "And when I say 'anything,' I can assure you I mean anything."...... "I'll never let him have it." That was Mo. ... "Oh, yes? And for how much longer, do you think? What about your daughter?.... Meggie wonders what the strange names mean, including the other one Dustfinger said "Capricorn" and what could he want that Mo will never give up? Very early the next morning Mo tells Meggie to pack quickly, that they're going to visit his aunt Elinor who needs some of her books repaired. Meggie is confused as she still has a week of school left but Mo, not in the mood to argue, has been unusually distressed since Dustfinger's arrival and is clearly in a hurry to leave. And, as always, he reminds her to pack plenty of books to read. He's always says "It's a good idea to have your own books with you when you're in a strange place." They just reach the gate when Dustfinger suddenly appears in the road and says he's coming along. This seems to upset Mo even more and Meggie, still fearful, isn't at all happy, either. As the journey lags on the discord between Mo and Dustfinger continues and Meggie knows something is being kept secret from her, something to do with a book she saw Mo hide in his suitcase, something that has Mo very anxious and worried. Elinor's house is enormous with bookshelves full of books, floor to ceiling in every room. In addition, Elinor makes it very apparent that she doesn't care for children. Not at all. Late that first night Meggie hears Mo and Elinor whispering about hiding the book so it can never be found. Only a little while later, that very night, men come and steal the book, taking Mo with them. The book was indeed kept safe and the men will soon discover that they have the wrong book. What will happen to Mo then? Elinor dislikes and doesn't trust Dustfinger but he says he knows where Mo has been taken leaving Meggie and Elinor no choice but to trust him to take them to exchange the book for Mo. Elinor finds she was right not to trust Dustfinger as he's deceived them, leading them right into a trap. They've been taken by gun point and reunited with Mo but are now locked up, terrified, and at the complete mercy of Capricorn. Mo has no choice but to tell Maggie the secret he's been hiding, why he's never read out loud to her, and about what really happened to her mother when Meggie was just three years old. Mo explains to Meggie that he can literally read characters out of a book. Mo was reading INKHART aloud to Meggie's mother when suddenly Capricorn appeared in their living room, along with a few of his men. And her mother was gone. Vanished. Mo managed to escape with Meggie, and the book and has been hiding from Capricorn ever since. Now, Meggie and Elinor are beginning to understand why Capricorn won't let them go now that he has the book. He needs Mo to read aloud everything he wants out of the book including gold and treasure. Dustfinger, too, has his own selfish adjenda for getting his hands on the book as he, himself, was read from the pages of INKHEART, and he wants to go back. More than anything in this world. Mo has refused to do what Capricorn wants thus far. And for good reason. But now, thanks to Dustfinger, Capricorn finally has everything he needs to make Mo obey. He has his Daughter, Meggie. And that's just the beginning. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke is a magical adventure that I found very hard to put down. It was everything a great story should be. A believable story line with magic for added fun and adventure. Endearing characters in Mo, Meggie, and Elinor who have me looking forward to reading their further adventures in Inkspell. Characters who are merciless and evil, who have no quandary about deceit, ruthlessness, and murder. It all goes flat out which I found surprising as it's a 500+ page book. It's an exciting and original story with lots of uncertainty and anticipation throughout that never loses momentum and keeps you guessing from beginning to end. I was drawn straight in and I found myself captivated within the pages for hours on end, turning the pages as fast as could to see what might happen next. I got goose bumps on countless occasions! Oh! What a sensational adventure!! I highly recommend it to anyone who loves books. Books to read, collect, and treasure.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maia

    Okay, I'm at hundred pages, and I'm like: someone just kill that loser Capricorn, and then FedEx the rest of the gang home! PLEASE! I'll pay Preferred! It goes like this: go here, go there, go back here, go back there, return to here, and so on... Also, this story was kind of scary, which doesn't rate high in my book (pun intended). The idea was excellent, but poorly executed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 2.5* of five EDITED TO ADD the 2008 film is very pretty, but not a lot less tedious than the book. A doorstop of a tome, it's way too long for the story. Meggie isn't interesting enough to make me want to follow her through the convolutions of discovery with Mo and Elinor. I can't believe this took over 500pp to tell! And yet, and yet...it's aimed at a very different demographic than I am...young girls, it would seem, want long long long books about nothing much, like those hideous Stepheni Rating: 2.5* of five EDITED TO ADD the 2008 film is very pretty, but not a lot less tedious than the book. A doorstop of a tome, it's way too long for the story. Meggie isn't interesting enough to make me want to follow her through the convolutions of discovery with Mo and Elinor. I can't believe this took over 500pp to tell! And yet, and yet...it's aimed at a very different demographic than I am...young girls, it would seem, want long long long books about nothing much, like those hideous Stephenie Meyer warts on the Devil's buttcheeks. So for its target audience, it's a huge improvement over the otherwise available material. What is it, BTW, that leads adolescent females down these primrose paths of tedium? My daughter loooved the Robert Jordan "Wheel of Time" crapola, and I think she still reads them (I'm afraid to ask). If Inkheart had weighed in at 300pp or so, it would have been a much more exciting book. Is there some double-X-chromosome disorder that prevents y'all from liking excitement? Inquiring minds want to know.

  15. 4 out of 5

    BookHound 🐾

    This novel was absolutely amazing!!! It was so full of suspense and adventure that didn't let up from the moment you start reading until you reach the end! I had seen the movie version of Inkheart, which made me want to read the book. And it was equally good as the movie. The storyline is very descriptive, which makes reading Inkheart that much better. As you read, you can visualize each of the characters, the landscapes in which the story is set, and every single scene of the story. Overall, a g This novel was absolutely amazing!!! It was so full of suspense and adventure that didn't let up from the moment you start reading until you reach the end! I had seen the movie version of Inkheart, which made me want to read the book. And it was equally good as the movie. The storyline is very descriptive, which makes reading Inkheart that much better. As you read, you can visualize each of the characters, the landscapes in which the story is set, and every single scene of the story. Overall, a great read for anyone who loves adventure or fantasy novels.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aj the Ravenous Reader

    This is certainly for children and children who like fantasies and adventures and books and who are patient enough to read so many pages that sometimes you'd think you're just going in circles. The story is interesting enough to make me finish the first book but not enough to make me read its sequels.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    Attention: I read this book as a library book and I only just realised that the book I have is only part 1! So this review is going to be of the first half of "Inkheart". This was a truly magical story that I know I would've absolutely adored as a child. It's about a love for books, and it's about how we - as readers - step into a fictional world, and how this fictional world can sometimes come true. I loved this story; especially the first 150 pages where the characters and setting are introduc Attention: I read this book as a library book and I only just realised that the book I have is only part 1! So this review is going to be of the first half of "Inkheart". This was a truly magical story that I know I would've absolutely adored as a child. It's about a love for books, and it's about how we - as readers - step into a fictional world, and how this fictional world can sometimes come true. I loved this story; especially the first 150 pages where the characters and setting are introduced. That being said, it did take me some effort to get through the last part (of this first part) of the book. As I said, I think I would've loved this book as a child, but reading it now as an adult made me a bit bored at this big escape that the characters are going on. I think I would've been perfectly happy if Meggie and her father Mo could've just stayed at home with their books and each other, because while the beginning of the big adventure was interesting, it did drag on for a bit too long in my opinion. Knowing that the second part of this book will probably just pick up from where part one ended, I'm not sure I'm going to pick it up anytime soon. Now, I know what the story and the characters are like, and I don't feel an urgent need to read the rest of it. BUT I still think that this is a magical story that will take you on quite a fictional adventure, and I'm happy that I got to know Meggie and Mo and their love for books.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A wonderful, imaginative story. The characters are so vivid, the tale so engaging, the prose so poetic... A glorious tale for anyone who ever dreamed of being transported into the stories she reads, or of having friends from the tales brought into our world! On her website, author Cornelia Funke says, "I didn't suspect that this story would grow untill it could fill more than one book. I have dreamed for a long time of writing a story in which characters from a book come into our world. Which book A wonderful, imaginative story. The characters are so vivid, the tale so engaging, the prose so poetic... A glorious tale for anyone who ever dreamed of being transported into the stories she reads, or of having friends from the tales brought into our world! On her website, author Cornelia Funke says, "I didn't suspect that this story would grow untill it could fill more than one book. I have dreamed for a long time of writing a story in which characters from a book come into our world. Which book addict doesn’t know the feeling that the characters in a book can seem more real than the people around us? And there is of course a simple reason for that. For which real person would permit us to look into their hearts as deeply as a storyteller permits us to look into his characters’? Into the deepest regions of their souls we may spy, see all their fears, all their love and all their dreams."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    I can't say that I've ever read a book like this one before, and the idea of a power that allows people to bring fictional characters to life is something that I think most authors wish they possessed. I really liked this book, at first I wasn't expecting much from it but it turned out to be phenomenal.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Queezle

    I have no idea why people like this book. Where is the character developement, the intrigue, the plot? It's like a lump. After I read it, I thought back and couldn't even remember the storyline - it was too jumpy and mumbled. Not a good work of fiction.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    As much as I hate to say it, but this book is really boring. I love children's books and read Harry Potter and His Dark Materials several times. Inkheart disappointed me. I never stop reading a book until I read at least 100 pages, to give an author a chance to develop a story. Unfortunately, I had to stop reading this book after page 150. It is extremely slowpaced and uneventful. It is surprising to know that kids actually have enough patience to finish and thoroughly enjoy this book. Maybe it' As much as I hate to say it, but this book is really boring. I love children's books and read Harry Potter and His Dark Materials several times. Inkheart disappointed me. I never stop reading a book until I read at least 100 pages, to give an author a chance to develop a story. Unfortunately, I had to stop reading this book after page 150. It is extremely slowpaced and uneventful. It is surprising to know that kids actually have enough patience to finish and thoroughly enjoy this book. Maybe it's just not my cup of tea...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patricija - aparecium_libri

    First read: 2009 approx. Second read: 2019. When I first read this, I was 12. My English teacher recommended it to me. I am 22 now, as I am rereading this. I loved it so much. From the characters, the plot, the old fashioned writing. I'm reading the sequel now, as a part of my O.W.L.s and I love the sequel even more. full RTC.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    My reading soul was battered and bruised, and a friend offered this book to me to help soothe the hurt. A lovely fantasy tale, with just enough villains and heroic folks to keep it balanced. You root for a happy ending and keep reading. Each chapter starts with a quote from a beloved children's classic, so you get to visit old friends on the journey through the story. A few passages helped assure me how much the author really does love books and all they represent. Meggie, tired and distressed at My reading soul was battered and bruised, and a friend offered this book to me to help soothe the hurt. A lovely fantasy tale, with just enough villains and heroic folks to keep it balanced. You root for a happy ending and keep reading. Each chapter starts with a quote from a beloved children's classic, so you get to visit old friends on the journey through the story. A few passages helped assure me how much the author really does love books and all they represent. Meggie, tired and distressed at one point, wearily "took out a book and tried to make herself a nice nest in its familiar words." Any book lover should be able to identify with that! Or later, Elinor, when trying to get comfortable in the ruins of a deserted cottage, ponders, "Why are adventures so much more fun when you read about them?" But perhaps my favorite is: Only in books could you find pity, comfort, happiness--and love. Books loved anyone who opened them, they gave you security and friendship and didn't ask anything in return; they never went away, never, not even when you treated them badly. Love, truth, beauty, wisdom and consolation against death. Who said that? Someone else who loved books:..."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    One of my favourite fantasy / middle grade books as it is totally gripping from start to finish and very fun to read. I loved the creative story and the characters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full review now posted! Is there anything more magical than a book literally coming to life? “Books have to be heavy because the whole world’s inside them.” For Meggie, books have always been the hub around which her life spins. Her dad, Mo, is a book doctor, rebinding books that have seen better days. Books are what the two bond over, are what they decorate their home with, and are how they relate to the world around them. But Mo has never ever read aloud to his daughter, that she can remember, an Full review now posted! Is there anything more magical than a book literally coming to life? “Books have to be heavy because the whole world’s inside them.” For Meggie, books have always been the hub around which her life spins. Her dad, Mo, is a book doctor, rebinding books that have seen better days. Books are what the two bond over, are what they decorate their home with, and are how they relate to the world around them. But Mo has never ever read aloud to his daughter, that she can remember, and in the pages of Inkheart Meggie discovers his reasons. “Some books should be tasted, some devoured, but only a few should be chewed and digested thoroughly.” This was a wonderful adventure, and is one that I’ve taken before and look forward to taking again. As I’ve said time and again, I love books about books. And Inkheart is an ode to the written word if ever there was one. However, Inkheart isn’t just a long song to stories, but to the physical books that house them. I’m a big believer in e-readers, especially for their portability, but nothing will ever take the place of a physical book for me. The sound of the pages, the smell of the ink, the texture of raised letters on a cover, the beauty of spines lined up on a shelf, can never be replaced by an electronic document. There’s just something about taking a book down off a shelf and knowing that you’re holding an entire world in your hands that an incredibly heady feeling. “If you take a book with you on a journey, an odd thing happens: the book begins collecting your memories. And forever after you have only to open the book to be back where you first read it. It will all come into your mind with the very first words: the sights you saw in that place, what it smelled like, the ice-cream you ate while you were reading it … yes, books are like flypapers. Memories cling to the printed page better than anything else.” The above quote is so true. If I pick up my Edgar Allen Poe collection, I remember being ten years old and reading “The Tell-Tale Heart” for the first time while hiding under the covers with a flashlight. When I open Ender’s Game, I remember sitting in alone in a Gifted classroom during my 5th grade year, reading through tears because Ender made me feel less alone. I remember reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in one day, when I had to stay home from school sick with the flu. Flowers for Algernon will always bring back to mind a road trip to Tennessee right after I graduated from college. Books matter. They really do preserve memories better than anything else, be those memories flower petals pressed between pages or personal memories that reside right inside the cover. The fictional Inkheart novel inside of this book was also wonderful. I adore books about books that don’t actually exist, especially this one, The Princess Bride, and The Shadow of the Wind. I always wish I could somehow reach into the book I’m reading and pull out the fictional book within it, but alas. Inkheart is populated with fairies, trolls, little glass people, murderers, fire-breathers, and magic. It was a wonderful addition to the story of a man who could read things right out of the pages he held in his hands. I was afraid that I wouldn’t enjoy this book as much on a reread, but thankfully I was mistaken. There was still just as much magic housed in its pages. And it’s a magic that I heartily recommend sharing with any children in your life, especially those who already love books. I can’t wait for my niece to be old enough to experience the magic that can be found within the written world. “Is there anything in the world better than words on a page? Magic signs, the voices of the dead, building blocks to make wonderful worlds better than this one, comforters, companions in loneliness. Keepers of secrets, speakers of the truth … all those glorious words.” Original review can be found at Booknest.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I honestly have truly tried to appreciate and even enjoy Cornelia Funke’s Inkheart (Anthea Bell’s English translation, as I do not own a personal copy of Tintenherz). However, after now having tried at least three times to unsuccessfully peruse (and complete) Inkheart, I am permanently giving up (and no, I will also more than likely not be bothering with the two sequels either). And even though at first I was kind of wondering whether it might be Anthea Bell’s translation with which I was having I honestly have truly tried to appreciate and even enjoy Cornelia Funke’s Inkheart (Anthea Bell’s English translation, as I do not own a personal copy of Tintenherz). However, after now having tried at least three times to unsuccessfully peruse (and complete) Inkheart, I am permanently giving up (and no, I will also more than likely not be bothering with the two sequels either). And even though at first I was kind of wondering whether it might be Anthea Bell’s translation with which I was having issues, I now actually do not think this to be the case with Inkheart, I absolutely do not think that Inkheart is just a mediocre translation of Cornelia Funke’s original German language text. For indeed, I do happen to consider the late Anthea Bell as one of the best German to English translators of especially children’s and young adult literature I have encountered to date and thus I for one cannot imagine that my negative reaction to the general writing style and modes of expression encountered in Inkheart is somehow primarily due to how Anthea Bell has rendered Tintenherz into English (especially since trusted Goodread friends who have indeed read Tintenherz, who have read the German original have pointed out in their own reviews that it does definitely display the same dull and unimaginative writing, with a tendency to meander around aimlessly that I have found so frustrating and annoying with Inkheart). But as much as I have therefore found the writing style Cornelia Funke uses in Inkheart dragging and uninspired, I probably would still have decided to continue reading (and to have rated Inkheart with two stars or perhaps even with a low three stars) if the thematics and contents of the presented narrative, if the basic storyline of Inkheart were not so not at all to my reading tastes and desires. For in my humble opinion, theme and textual content wise, Inkheart is also incredibly, horribly preachy in general tone in particular with regard to the importance of books and reading (a message that is of course important and essential and one with which I very much happen to agree, but is verbally presented by Cornelia Funke almost like a religious sermon, and yes, I for one do very much despise being evsngelised), not to mention that the division of the novel’s cardboard thin characters into stereotypical good or evil entities has certainly both majorly rubbed me the wrong proverbial way and has equally very quickly caused me lose any kind of interest with either completing Inkheart or even remotely considering continuing with the trilogy.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dan Lutts

    I've noticed Cornelia Funke'sInkheart in bookstores for the past several years but the blurb on the back cover never interested me enough to read it. Then last fall, while I was home recuperating from surgery with plenty of time on my hands and my eyes were bothering me from reading, I watched the 2008 movie version of Inkheart on Netflix. I found the story delightful and bought the book – which is just as delightful. Meggie, who's twelve, lives in Italy with her father, Mortimer, who she calls M I've noticed Cornelia Funke'sInkheart in bookstores for the past several years but the blurb on the back cover never interested me enough to read it. Then last fall, while I was home recuperating from surgery with plenty of time on my hands and my eyes were bothering me from reading, I watched the 2008 movie version of Inkheart on Netflix. I found the story delightful and bought the book – which is just as delightful. Meggie, who's twelve, lives in Italy with her father, Mortimer, who she calls Mo. She had a mother who left so many years ago that she doesn't remember anything about her. Mo, has a unique gift: when he reads a book out loud, he can read random characters or things out the book into this world. Unfortunately, one problem with his gift is that someone or something from this world goes into the book's world. Turns out, when Mo was reading Inkheart years ago, the book's villain, Capricorn, showed up in Mo's living room. Now Dustfinger tells Mo that Capricorn is looking for him. In a panic, Mo sweeps Meggie off to her eccentric book-collector Aunt Elinor to hide. But no one is safe from Capricorn and his henchmen, who capture Mo and take him to Capricorn's hideout that's way off the beaten track. Meggie, Elinor, Dustfinger, who's an unreliable ally, and Gwin set off to rescue him. That's when the action starts and Meggie discovers that she, too, has a unique gift. But will she be able to use her gift in time to save Mo from certain death? Five stars for a delightful book and also for the movie. There are two more novels in the series, Inkspell and Inkdeath, which I'll be reading soon.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Excellent book (haven't seen the movie). A youth book, I looked forward to getting the sequels and grabbed them as soon as they were available. Dropping back to add this. I'm surprised how different tastes can be. I really liked this book (and its sequels)and was very surprised to see the negative reviews. I didn't find the book ever dragged and while I did find the characters annoying at times, it was within the context of the story and not as "annoyingly written characters". For a youth book I'd Excellent book (haven't seen the movie). A youth book, I looked forward to getting the sequels and grabbed them as soon as they were available. Dropping back to add this. I'm surprised how different tastes can be. I really liked this book (and its sequels)and was very surprised to see the negative reviews. I didn't find the book ever dragged and while I did find the characters annoying at times, it was within the context of the story and not as "annoyingly written characters". For a youth book I'd be very careful as some of the "villains" here are genuinely frightening and could be a bit much for younger children, but were my children still young I'd read these to them. I developed a love for books early on and this book plays to that...I mentioned elsewhere that I loved Lilith by George MacDonald, I believe that it was the library scene in that book that first sold me or drew me into that book. This is a book full of book lovers for book lovers. Most any reader knows that a book can be a door to another world, here Funke took the idea and "built on it" with a certain amount of...literalness. Recommended.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Inkheart: such an evocative title, such a fertile concept, such a banal execution. Our story follows a widower named Mo Folchart and his daughter, Meggie. They live in Germany or Switzerland, I think, although I don’t remember the book ever clarifying this. Meggie is twelve, and getting antsy for the truth about what happened to her mother long ago, when Meggie was but an infant, but Mo keeps dancing around the question. Mo is a professional bookbinder, specializing in the antique and out-of-print Inkheart: such an evocative title, such a fertile concept, such a banal execution. Our story follows a widower named Mo Folchart and his daughter, Meggie. They live in Germany or Switzerland, I think, although I don’t remember the book ever clarifying this. Meggie is twelve, and getting antsy for the truth about what happened to her mother long ago, when Meggie was but an infant, but Mo keeps dancing around the question. Mo is a professional bookbinder, specializing in the antique and out-of-print. Their little house is filled from top to bottom with books, and father and daughter love them all. Most of their conversations revolve around books. They constantly refer to the characters in their favorite stories. But Mo has never read aloud to his daughter, and despite her begging he has never told her why. Mo and Meggie’s life chugs along with no change until the dramatic entrance of Dustfinger—a flame-haired man who juggles fire and keeps a snippy pet marten on his shoulder. Meggie is immediately awed by Dustfinger, feeling that he is not of this world—and she’s right, although it will be awhile before Mo comes clear to her where exactly Dustfinger came from, and how he and Mo know each other, but as intelligent readers I’m sure you’ve connected all the dots. Mo pulls Meggie out of school with no warning, and they drive south to Italy to visit grouchy Elinor, the aunt of Mo’s dead wife. Elinor’s house is packed with books. Elinor likes books better than people. Many people on this site claim that, but this character, bless her little heart, actually means it. Dustfinger follows them. With no choice left, Mo tells Meggie that he has the rare and magic gift of reading things to life. When he reads aloud, characters and objects can be drawn out of their book and into our world. But people and things from our world can be read into books in the same way. When Meggie was an infant, Mo read aloud from a dark high fantasy novel called Inkheart—releasing the amoral Dustfinger along with the evil criminals who were hunting him, led by a sadistic warlord named Capricorn. As if in exchange, Mo’s wife, Resa, and the two family cats vanished into the world of the book. Capricorn and his cronies have a vague sort of plan for eventual world domination, and they have employed a man with the same gift as Mo to read all their friends, slaves and stolen treasures out of their home book. But their reader, Darius, is nowhere near as accomplished as Mo, and the people he has read forth still have remnants of words on their skin like ugly tattoos. Capricorn is dissatisfied with this, and hearing that Mo is in Italy sends his goons to kidnap the man. Elinor, Meggie and Dustfinger all hate each other but now have to work together to rescue Mo. They themselves get captured by the baddies. Then they escape, accompanied by a lad named Farid who appeared with a few chests of gold when Mo was forced to read from the Arabian Nights. Then they get recaptured. Then they escape again, reach the nearest city and meet up with Fenoglio, the old eccentric who wrote the book years ago, in hopes that he’ll write the demise of Capricorn & Co. so Mo can read it into truth. Then they get recaptured. Then they escape. Then there’s some weirdness between Dustfinger and Resa, a maid in Cap’s village. Resa is very beautiful and clever, but has been mute ever since Darius read her out of the book. Resa is also none other than Mo’s missing wife and Meggie’s long-lost momma, but it’s hinted here that Dustfinger is in love with her, and the sequel hints at an actual affair between the two. You know, for kids! Then…wait for it…they get recaptured. And escape again. And then Mo reads a scary shadow out of Fenoglio’s new scribbles that miraculously does what the narration tells it to do—namely swallow Capricorn and most of his goons, disgorge all those innocents he had killed, and promptly disappear again without hurting any of the designated good guys—instead of having a mind of its own like every single read-to-life character has done until this point. Mo and Resa are reunited, and they and Meggie go to live with cranky old Elinor. Dustfinger rambles on (cue Zeppelin), looking for another “Silver-tongue” to read him home, and Farid goes with him, hoping to learn the secrets of fire. The plot threads, such as they were, have all been tied up, but the concept—always the strongest part of this book—has barely been scratched, so Funke was entirely justified in turning this standalone into a trilogy, even if Inkspell had some serious problems and my hopes are not high for Inkdeath. The world-building is good too. Funke has clearly spent a lot of time in Italy—her descriptions of the meandering mountain roads, secret valleys, thorny chaparrals, and cat-congested cobblestone streets make you feel not only like you’re there, but like you have been there before. I would be quite happy adventuring in Funke’s Tuscany… …unfortunately, I wouldn’t particularly want any of her characters for a tour guide. Mo has very little personality. Meggie idealizes him as the perfect daddy, even though he has withheld important information from her for no discernable reason. His reasons for not helping Dustfinger are understandable, but he still comes off as unnecessarily cold and selfish with the man from the Inkworld. Dustfinger—while much, much cooler and more interesting than Mo or anyone else in the book—is amoral and surly and not much fun to actually spend time with. He has the projected grit of an Aragorn or a Han Solo, but Aragorn was quickly revealed to be a man of true courage and honor, and Han picked up those qualities without realizing it as he grew in his friendship with Luke and his love for Leia. With Dustfinger, alas, the cold-hearted self-sufficiency is no act. He feels some dim kinship of spirit with Farid, which has deepened a bit by the second book, and he also has paternal feelings for Meggie—which don’t seem quite as cute once you figure out he was carrying on an affair with her mother, but never mind. I understand that Dustfinger and Resa were both far from home; he had every reason to assume that he’d never see his wife again and she would be justified in thinking that Mo was murdered by Cap & Co. when they were read out of the book. They were terribly lonely and drawn to each other. But this is ostensibly a book for children, and I question whether Funke’s broad hints, which get even more pronounced in the second book, are appropriate for the target audience. Meggie is twelve, we’re told, but with her nauseating daddy-worship and her habits of pouting, stomping, and blurting out her thoughts no matter how unkind, she reads more like seven or eight. I have known troubled kids from broken homes like hers, and many of them did act five years younger than their chronological age—but such kids are often also rebellious early, so Meggie’s unwavering faith in Mo rings false too. She even carts around a box painted to resemble a little red wagon, wherein she carries books like Where the Wild Things Are wherever she goes. While WtWTA is of course a masterpiece, Meggie is at the age where she should be rebelling against all vestiges of childhood. She should want to show off her worldliness by getting trashy teen novels from the library, not deliberately clinging to picture books. Nowadays I’d be delighted to spend an afternoon reading American Girl books, but at her age I was in such a hurry to be distinct from my nine-year-old self that I wouldn’t have been caught dead with my old favorites. Interestingly, WtWTA is also glimpsed in Sarah’s bedroom in the beginning of Labyrinth, and Sarah at least four years older than Meggie. That film, along with The Princess Bride and other eighties fantasies, was clearly a big influence on this book, which borrowed a lot of its visuals but missed its meaning. Labyrinth is all about a young girl learning to grow up, and let go of the past while still honoring it—and since she’s in her upper teens, coming of age also entails a handsome gentleman sending mixed signals and a disastrous courtship that never quite gets off the ground—although it surely will at some later date. (One does not simply eat magic fruit, especially when a broody dude who is twenty years older than you and lives underground offers it. Just ask Persephone). At Meggie’s age, a romance of any kind would be inappropriate—what happens with Farid in Inkspell is unsurprising but still creepy, given how infantilized she’s been—so her coming-of-age, her scary experience that shakes her worldview, should be learning that her father is fallible and cannot always protect her. You’d think being repeatedly captured and terrorized by Capricorn’s thugs would have taught her that. You’d think that learning that he knew where her mom was the whole time and never told her would have taught her that. You’d think that hearing Dustfinger’s perspective, skewed as it is, would have at least suggested the possibility to her. Nope, nope, nada. Even Laura Ingalls Wilder might have found Meggie a bit much in this department. At least this aspect improves somewhat in Inkspell. Then we have Elinor, who might be the author’s self-parody. I think she’s deliberately made to be annoying, but that isn’t enough to excuse her after a while. This woman literally values paper and ink over flesh and blood. She grieves like Hecuba when Cap’s cowards destroy her library, but has shown barely any human empathy when her great-niece was in danger. Her constant fuming, pacing, and exclamations of “Damn!” get quite tiresome after about the twentieth repetition. Fenoglio is the stereotypical zany writer. Not much to say about him. There’s little to say about Farid, either. He’s just a kid. He’s used to sand. He’s scared of ghosts. He’s quiet. Dustfinger’s marten likes him, and Dustfinger’s marten hates everything else that moves, so Farid has at least one special quality. Yay, Farid. You have the Spiteful Animal Stamp of Approval. In book two, we find out that Farid has a second character trait—horniness—but this is not explored here, thank God, because Meggie is a psychological seven year old at most and that would be squick. Capricorn is evil just for evil’s sake, apparently, a sadist and a snake. He’s not a complex or even very original villain, but he seems truly evil, as opposed to being bad because the heroes and the narrator say so. He’s well-written—and arguably too scary for a book aimed at ten-year-olds. Granted, he’s no more terrifying than Jadis, but we as readers don’t spend nearly as much time with her in the Narnia books as we do with him in this. Basta is a convincing little medieval Mafioso who just won’t die. You’ll hate him, but you’re supposed to, so good job, Cornelia. The Magpie is also terrifying, reminiscent of those ruthless mob mamas found throughout medieval and Renaissance Italy. Luckily she doesn’t die in this installment, although she is sorely underused in the sequel. The plot, as described in earlier paragraphs, is abysmal. The same events repeat over and over in slightly different sequences, like playing an album that you've heard a million times on shuffle. There was a movie of this about ten years ago, which I realize followed the book quite closely. Andy Serkis, Paul Bettany, and the girl who played Meggie gave good performances, but Brendon Frasier never seemed invested in his part, and the book itself is not well-structured. It would need to be resequenced, rather like The Phantom of the Opera or Prince Caspian, to have a good cinematic arc. The movie also features Jennifer Connelly briefly as Dustfinger’s wife, which is cute because she’s married to Bettany in real life, and also funny due to the Labyrinth influence on this story. Violence: Lots, especially considering the young target audience. Our main characters are constantly being menaced by armed, mentally deranged men. They are thrown into prison cells; they are stuffed into hanging cages; they are sentenced for execution. A man has scars on both sides of his face from when a rival attacked him. A woman is traumatized—possibly raped, if you read between the lines—and it is mentioned, although never shown, that she often gets beaten. Frequent rapine and plundering of the villages near Capricorn’s are also mentioned but take place off-page. At the end, a terrifying smoke monster appears, summoned by Fenoglio’s words, and swallows all the bad guys (except Basta and the Magpie). Also, Funke is strangely cavalier about cruelty to cats. She nonchalantly tells us that the inhabitants of Fenoglio’s city leave bowls of poisoned kibble out for the strays. Not cool. #CatLivesMatter Sex: Nothing shown, but there are some fairly adult implications about Dustfinger and Resa’s relationship, as previously mentioned. Language: Other than Elinor using “Damn!” as a punctuation mark, nada. Substance Abuse: I seem to remember that the guards at Capricorn’s prison are usually hammered. In conclusion, this is not a terrible book, but nor is it a particularly good one. It has a great concept but is not itself well-plotted or peopled. A fun read, but not an essential.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    I must be insane to want to read the further installments of a book I rated a one just 5 seconds ago. This review is an attempt at understanding why I ended up disliking a book whose author has talent and passion for reading and inventing stories. Cornelia Funke has spun a good story but I still will not read Inkheart ever again in this lifetime. This story should have clocked at 300 pages max. Instead the wordy tale maxed my patience and milked any kindness that might have been sloshing inside I must be insane to want to read the further installments of a book I rated a one just 5 seconds ago. This review is an attempt at understanding why I ended up disliking a book whose author has talent and passion for reading and inventing stories. Cornelia Funke has spun a good story but I still will not read Inkheart ever again in this lifetime. This story should have clocked at 300 pages max. Instead the wordy tale maxed my patience and milked any kindness that might have been sloshing inside me. "Just end already, I can't bear another sentence anymore." This is the first time I've quoted myself in a review. Shows how desperate I was to end a book that I wasn't going to abandon reading. I don't do that anymore. Each sentence seemed to be lovingly glued to form a mushy work of art which left me puzzled and drained. At first the lengthiness if the book puzzled me mighty fine. There weren't any flowery description. And though Mo is a "book doctor", there is no documentary like account of book binding and repairing. There isn't any lingering or focusing on any single thing for an inordinate amount of time. But then I discovered part of the reason for the boredom, it was because the names peopling Inkheart often moved like banal chess pieces on a board. Mo and Elinor get captured. They escaped. Meggie gets captured. At one point there's traveling towards danger, at other points the evading persons flee away. Just pieces of a board game getting captured then coming back from entrapment. Inkheart is a book within a book. Just like Sophie's world. Unlike the latter however, this author doesn't big up or flatter its own work. Only fragments of the "real" Inkheart book is shown. The author shies away from praising her shadowy fiction. I found the characters of Capricorn and Basta et al terribly dull and frustrating. They don't do anything evil. They don't feel evil. They should have been even more pathetic in their native world, where magicians and faeries abound. How they came to get any sense of entitlement is a baffling mystery. They seem like losers. Like bullies. Capricorn dies like a fool. The best part throughout is when Resa is introduced. From then you get the feeling that a showdown is preparing to be deployed. There's what people used to call a lost and found formula here. How Mo was going to rescue his family turned out to be a disappointment. Another dead end and a letdown. But the end makes me slightly curious for Inheart 2. I must be mental. I want to know what happens to Dustfinger and where Fenoglio went. It seemed bad when the book ended where it did. Did I say BAD? I meant good. Good like in good riddance.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.