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The Stepford Wives

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Author: Ira Levin

Published: July 23rd 2002 by Perennial (first published September 1972)

Format: Paperback , 144 pages

Isbn: 9780060080846

Language: English


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For Joanna, her husband, Walter, and their children, the move to beautiful Stepford seems almost too good to be true. It is. For behind the town's idyllic facade lies a terrible secret—a secret so shattering that no one who encounters it will ever be the same. At once a masterpiece of psychological suspense and a savage commentary on a media-driven society that values the p For Joanna, her husband, Walter, and their children, the move to beautiful Stepford seems almost too good to be true. It is. For behind the town's idyllic facade lies a terrible secret—a secret so shattering that no one who encounters it will ever be the same. At once a masterpiece of psychological suspense and a savage commentary on a media-driven society that values the pursuit of youth and beauty at all costs, The Stepford Wives is a novel so frightening in its final implications that the title itself has earned a place in the American lexicon.

30 review for The Stepford Wives

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    “That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.” Katharine Ross stars in the 1975 movie version Joanna Eberhart is an accomplished photographer. A woman comfortable with herself, in love with her husband, and raising two “That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.” Katharine Ross stars in the 1975 movie version Joanna Eberhart is an accomplished photographer. A woman comfortable with herself, in love with her husband, and raising two charming/rambunctious children. They decide to move to Stepford, Connecticut an idyllic community full of successful people and beautiful scenery. In an attempt to get to know her neighbors she soon discovers that the women are too busy waxing floors and ironing clothes to really spend time with her. They are friendly and will offer her a cup of coffee, but they are driven to keep working as they chat. These women have singular ideas and no ambition outside of pleasing their husbands and maintaining their households. WEIRD even in 1972. The men have a club that is truly a men’s only affair. This is irritating to Joanna, but after some discussion they decide that her husband Walter should join the club to initiate change from the inside. Joanna does start to talk to the local women about picketing the club and forcing the organization to allow women to participate, but she is met with stoic indifference. She does meet one woman named Bobbie who is different from the robotic devotion of the other women in the community even to the point of having a *gasp* dirty house. With the aid of her new friend Joanna tries to get support to resurrect a women’s club that went away many years ago that failed, not surprisingly, due to poor membership numbers. Her husband Walter meanwhile is spending more and more time down at the club. Nicole Kidman stars in the 2004 movie version Walter brings home Dale Coba, president of the men’s club and a famous artist named Ike Mazzard whose sketches of woman set an impossibly high ideal of what a woman should look like in all the women’s magazines. The group does allow Joanna to participate in the conversation and while they are talking Ike Mazzard sketches her. He gives her one of the sketches and Joanna is disconcerted at this idealized portrait of herself. It turns out all the women have one. Blueprint? Dale Coba gives Joanna the heebie jeebies. He used to work for Disney and as events unfold it becomes more and more clear what a large part he has played in making Stepford an “ideal community”. Poodle Skirt This book is considered a thriller satire. It certainly makes fun of the idealized female portrait of the 1950s when women supposedly did housework in poodle skirts and kept their hair, nails, and figure in immaculate condition. I’m sure there are still men who would like their women to meet that criteria. They might even pine for a woman to fetch them a beer when they hear him crushing an empty can from his recliner, but most of us enjoy the equality of women with jobs, with careers, with interests, with hobbies, and able to discuss with us more than just what’s for dinner. This book made such an impact that now “Stepford” is a part of our popular culture language used to describe a submissive housewife. I impulsively decided to read this book when I discovered that my local library did not have a copy of Ira Levin’s even more famous book Rosemary’s Baby. Sometimes detours are as fun or more fun than the originally intended destination. If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Ira Levin’s 1972 novel The Stepford Wives is a darkly comedic and satirical modern horror story with cautionary but subtle overtones. Originally and commonly misunderstood to remark upon the growing feminist movement in the late sixties it is instead a scathing indictment on conservative attacks on women’s liberation. Levin describes a family that has recently moved into the quiet suburban township of Stepford, where a caste of upwardly mobile male professionals have barricaded themselves into an Ira Levin’s 1972 novel The Stepford Wives is a darkly comedic and satirical modern horror story with cautionary but subtle overtones. Originally and commonly misunderstood to remark upon the growing feminist movement in the late sixties it is instead a scathing indictment on conservative attacks on women’s liberation. Levin describes a family that has recently moved into the quiet suburban township of Stepford, where a caste of upwardly mobile male professionals have barricaded themselves into an affluent and influential Men’s Association. Joanna Eberhart, a smart and talented married mother of two realizes quickly that she does not fit into the picture perfect stylized stereotype of the wives of Stepford who toil about the house in crisp Donna Reed dresses and makeup while their husband’s while away the nights at the Men’s club. More disconcerting, Joanna realizes that there is a more sinister explanation for this odd discontinuity. Reader's will notice a similarity with Jack Finney's brilliant 1955 allegory Invasion of the Body Snatchers and with Robert A. Heinlein's The Puppet Masters, though Levin eschews sci-fi fun for a mainstream horror genre delivery. Levin’s prose is elegant and direct, his storyline tight and focused on his understated message. A very good read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    When I finished Larry McMurtry's 800 page novel, Moving On two weeks ago, I felt like a war widow, grieving her fallen soldier. I had become desperately attached to every single character in that slow-paced but brilliant story, and after closing the back cover, I paced my house like a desperate ghoul, ordering books from the library and Amazon, in an attempt to fill the void. Turns out, one of the books in my new stack of arrivals was written just two years after Moving On (McMurtry's novel came When I finished Larry McMurtry's 800 page novel, Moving On two weeks ago, I felt like a war widow, grieving her fallen soldier. I had become desperately attached to every single character in that slow-paced but brilliant story, and after closing the back cover, I paced my house like a desperate ghoul, ordering books from the library and Amazon, in an attempt to fill the void. Turns out, one of the books in my new stack of arrivals was written just two years after Moving On (McMurtry's novel came out first in 1970), and both cover the theme of the Western woman trying to emerge after a mere millennium or more of mistreatment and casual abuse. Women's liberation, if you will. But, the similarities stop there. The Stepford Wives couldn't be more different than Moving On, but I loved them both, and I'm only drawing comparisons in this particular review to bring attention to the diversity in writing styles and tastes that exist in our world and the gratitude I feel for having the opportunity to develop into such an eclectic reader. Moving On was a tall cool drink of water, a Texas tale of characters and dialogue so real, I feel like I have wronged them by leaving them behind. It's a novel that has almost no real action at its core, and I certainly wouldn't describe it as plot-driven. My copy ended up with some thirty dog-eared pages. The Stepford Wives has characters that amount to nothing more than mere sketches of people, and scanty dialogue at best. It is completely plot-based and is a short little jaunt at 123 pages, but I truly marvel at the imagination that Ira Levin must have possessed to come up with this story. And. . . holy shit. . . did my heart race! I was so anxious at the end, I'm surprised I didn't drip sweat right down onto the book's pages. What a privilege to be able to read and to be exposed to such depths of human understanding and creativity. I'm just sitting here, smiling in awe. A total book geek.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan Budd

    In the early 80s, I took a college course in feminist theory. That’s where I was introduced to the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir, Kate Millet, and Betty Friedan. Little did I know that I could have saved myself a lot of time by reading The Stepford Wives instead. The Stepford Wives is one of the popular books of the 1970s that I somehow overlooked, though I did see the 1975 movie on television years later. What recently prompted me to finally read the book was an article at JSTOR Daily titled “Sex In the early 80s, I took a college course in feminist theory. That’s where I was introduced to the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir, Kate Millet, and Betty Friedan. Little did I know that I could have saved myself a lot of time by reading The Stepford Wives instead. The Stepford Wives is one of the popular books of the 1970s that I somehow overlooked, though I did see the 1975 movie on television years later. What recently prompted me to finally read the book was an article at JSTOR Daily titled “Sex and the Supermarket” (1/3/18). While reading “Sex and the Supermarket,” I recalled the image of the women of Stepford in their maxi dresses, gloves, and floppy hats, languidly pushing their shopping carts down the aisles of the supermarket. The clothes inspired me with nostalgia. The sexism did not. Ira Levin’s 1972 novel manages to convey that sexism in a hundred or so pages of tight suspenseful prose. I didn’t remember much from the 1975 movie ~ just the premise of the story and the image of the soulless wives with their neatly-filled shopping carts ~ but it was enough for me to be able to read the novel as a feminist text without the distraction of wondering what Stepford’s sinister secret was. A couple of scenes stood out to me as I read. Ike Mazzard, a magazine illustrator who created idealized images of women, sketches Joanna. When she notices what he is doing, she feels “as if she were naked” (29). The way Dale Coba looks at her is “disparaging” (26, 27, 31). He says “I like to watch women doing little domestic chores” (30). This made me think of Simone de Beauvoir’s existentialist feminism. The problem, as defined by existentialist feminism, is that man casts himself in the role of subject and woman in the role of object; himself as observer and woman as observed; himself as Self and woman as Other. These two scenes effectively convey that creepy feeling women get when subjected to the ‘male gaze,’ that feeling of being naked, of being watched, of being reduced to an object. Radical feminism defines the problem as the patriarchal nature of society itself. And Stepford is this patriarchy in microcosm. It is perpetuated from one generation to the next. When one of the wives’ behavior suddenly changes, turning her from a spitfire into a hausfrau, her young son approves of the change in his mother. Instead of missing her spunk, he welcomes her subservience. But the feminist theory that most informs this book is liberal feminism and the feminist text that The Stepford Wives brings to mind is The Feminine Mystique. But this is no revelation. Joanna and Bobbie are members of NOW. Betty Friedan once gave a lecture to a Stepford women’s club. The backlash against women’s liberation in Stepford is a backlash against Friedan’s analysis and rejection of “Occupation: housewife.” The men of Stepford don’t want liberated women. They don’t want equals. They want wives who live only for their husbands, wives whose sole fulfillment comes from keeping house for her husband and satisfying his sexual desires. They want wives who wear push-up bras and girdles as they clean their kitchens, wives with large breasts and lipstick who get ecstatic over floor wax. But all men aren’t like this, right? Joanna’s husband Walter seems happy with their life as equals. At least, that’s how he seems in the beginning. Yet Walter is just like all the other Stepford men. When his discontent with having an equal for a wife finally comes out in full force, he reveals the insidious nature of the sexism identified by Friedan: that it isn’t just out there in society; it’s at home as well. In a chilling scene, Joanna becomes adamant about moving away from Stepford and Walter uses all the tactics of the manipulative emotional abuser: He pretends to consider her point of view, but at the same time he calls her “irrational” and “a little hysterical” (87) He tries to arouse guilt by explaining how hard it would be on the kids. Then he suggests she visit a psychiatrist to see if she’s delusional. In other words, he tries to make her doubt reality. He tries to gaslight her. The Stepford Wives is a book that deserves its iconic status. It succeeds as both a feminist text and a psychological horror story. And it is no less needed now than it was in 1972. We may have come a long way baby, but we still have a ways to go.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I can handle watching or reading just about any level of horror... so what was it about this tiny little novella that I read in an hour that truly chilled me? First, I have never seen the movies... so I had no real preconceived notions other than having seen the commercials. Something about being a girl, who was raised in a society where everything tells you that you have to be beautiful, you have to be talented, and above all you have to be perfect or you are nothing... this book really taps in I can handle watching or reading just about any level of horror... so what was it about this tiny little novella that I read in an hour that truly chilled me? First, I have never seen the movies... so I had no real preconceived notions other than having seen the commercials. Something about being a girl, who was raised in a society where everything tells you that you have to be beautiful, you have to be talented, and above all you have to be perfect or you are nothing... this book really taps into that mantra. The feeling that every little girl has that "I'm not good enough" most of us (hopefully) follow that up with "but at least I'm ME" and that is where the terror of this book lies. What if the ultimate deceiver, the true villain is the one person who should love you the most, your protector, your partner, your husband. What if he would change you... take away your identity for his own pleasure... and what if everyone was on his side. How would you hold on, how could you escape? As you can tell this book really hit a nerve with me... true I was born in 1978, so this was a little before my time, but it hasn't changed all that much even though we want to think so. The book is really about men's desires, or Levin's interpretation of them. That they would be willing to sacrifice their wife's very identity, her being, to make her a mindless barbie that did what they pleased. The men in this book are truly horrifying beings... but even more frightening is that this is a doubt shared by all women, across the globe. From a young age we are taught to doubt ourselves, our physical appearance, our mind, our talent, the love of others. I know women with genius IQ's who act like idiots because that is what men want from them. Though there is overnight drug that can do this to a woman... there is the lifelong barrage of the media and society which does a pretty good job in and of itself. Off my soapbox now. This book freaked me out... it was very well written, very tight and compact, and rediculously short for the price. I would advise getting it from a library, a used book store, or a friend rather than spending the cover amount on it. Mainly because it is so short. Still, I think this book has a lot of meaning, this book should be read and discussed with others... and to the ladies out there... odds are you will end up a bit unsettled and a bit angry at the end of it all.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    I REALLY do like Ira Levin's style of writing!There's a frightening secret in the town of Stepford, and Joanna & Bobbie hope to get out of Dodge before it's too late, but the Men's Association is powerful and time is running out.THE STEPFORD WIVES is a creepy little satirical novella that proves (some) men are pretty shallow or really were afraid of the Women's Liberation Movement!Suspenseful and deadly read! I REALLY do like Ira Levin's style of writing!There's a frightening secret in the town of Stepford, and Joanna & Bobbie hope to get out of Dodge before it's too late, but the Men's Association is powerful and time is running out.THE STEPFORD WIVES is a creepy little satirical novella that proves (some) men are pretty shallow or really were afraid of the Women's Liberation Movement!Suspenseful and deadly read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When Johanna, Walter, and their children move to Stepford, everything seems perfect. A little too perfect, in fact. Why do all the Stepford wives live to do housework and please their husbands? Is their a conspiracy afoot or are Johanna and her friend Bobbie imagining things? The Stepford Wives is a paranoid thriller by Ira Levin. There is also quite a bit of social satire as well. What would a community be like if all the women behaved like the stereotypical 1950's style housewife? It's a pretty When Johanna, Walter, and their children move to Stepford, everything seems perfect. A little too perfect, in fact. Why do all the Stepford wives live to do housework and please their husbands? Is their a conspiracy afoot or are Johanna and her friend Bobbie imagining things? The Stepford Wives is a paranoid thriller by Ira Levin. There is also quite a bit of social satire as well. What would a community be like if all the women behaved like the stereotypical 1950's style housewife? It's a pretty creepy book, though Levin eases you into the waters little by little so you don't notice all the dead animals around the pond until you're up to your neck in it. The feel reminded me of Jack Finney's Body Snatchers a bit. When will it be Johanna's turn to join the ranks of the sexually charged housewife drones? On the negative side of the scale, the book is very much a product of its time. All of the male characters seem like they'd be right at home working with Don Draper. Also, the 1972 publishing date wasn't all that far removed from the book's 1950's portrayal of male and female cultural ideals. Now, over 40 years after the book was written, everything seems quaint and a little ridiculous. 3.5 out of 5 stars. I'm throwing in an extra .5 for the level of creepiness.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bren

    “That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.” Ira Levin-The Stepford Wives. It is important for people who are not familiar with the original Stepford wives to understand that this is not a comedy. It is a genuinely frighte “That’s what she was, Joanna felt suddenly. That’s what they all were, all the Stepford wives: actresses in commercials, pleased with detergents and floor wax, with cleansers, shampoos, and deodorants. Pretty actresses, big in the bosom but small in the talent, playing housewives unconvincingly, too nicey-nice to be real.” Ira Levin-The Stepford Wives. It is important for people who are not familiar with the original Stepford wives to understand that this is not a comedy. It is a genuinely frightening novella that is fantastic but creepy as anything. I feel that this is one of the best. Fun it is not. It is very rare that one reads a book with such a strong sense of doom as the Stepford wives. It is bleak, dark and horrifying. If there is one thing I worry about, it is that some people, not having read this, and not having seen the original movie, will go into this thinking it's going to be a light funny book. Nothing is further from the truth. This is a genuinely frightening read and a great one as well. This novel is quite short and you will not be able to turn away. You will notice I have not done a plot review. Do I really need to do that with this book? I think not. I cannot remember or think of to many books that take the idea of marriage and drive an arrow through it as effectively as this book. And it is also important to note that the original movie is just like the book. I did love the remake and enjoyed it for what it was but it wasn’t close to being at the level of the original. This is one of those times where I honestly don’t know what is better, the book or the movie. They’re pretty closely aligned and they are both just horrifying. I have heard many different theories about what Levin was trying to achieve with this book. Far be it for me to know but he created a terrifying tale that was so powerful that the term Stepford wife made it into the human consciousness and still exists so powerfully today. Now I have to say that I can think of some men who might go along with scheme like this if it were possible. Can you? Without naming names, a certain powerful (and repelling) person with the initials: DJT perhaps? Or perhaps a certain person who was featured in the news this week for screaming and ranting at Alexandria Ocasio Cortez. Things have changed a lot since since this book was written. But they haven’t changed as much as many would like. There are still many men who are terrified at the idea of female power in any form. It’s frequent, it’s pervasive and it is damn scary. This book will never ever lose its relevance and if one hasn’t read it, they really should.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Warning: spoilery stuff ahead The amazing thing about this story is its wide-reaching cultural impact. Whether you've read the book or seen any of the film versions, when you hear the term "Stepford wife", you know what it refers to: an immaculate woman in a 1950's throwback poodle skirt, with an impressive rack - and a glassy, eerie gaze. She's "so busy" with her housework and pleasing the husband she is so lucky to have, she doesn't have time for anything else. The idea behind this chilling soci Warning: spoilery stuff ahead The amazing thing about this story is its wide-reaching cultural impact. Whether you've read the book or seen any of the film versions, when you hear the term "Stepford wife", you know what it refers to: an immaculate woman in a 1950's throwback poodle skirt, with an impressive rack - and a glassy, eerie gaze. She's "so busy" with her housework and pleasing the husband she is so lucky to have, she doesn't have time for anything else. The idea behind this chilling social satire is nothing less than ingenious and that is why this book has achieved iconic status. But the reading of this novella is a whole other thing. A brief 125 pages, this reads like poor YA with a few errant sex scenes. The super simplistic plot, the cardboard characters, and the lack of tension for the most part, combine to make for a truly lacklustre reading experience. Had I not the stunning visuals in my mind from the silver screen versions, it would have been far more forgettable. It's a satire on misogyny and oppression. It portrays an exaggerated, negative male response to feminism. I understand that. However, the author failed to interest me - not with language, motivation, characterisation, or fear. He repeats the word "hausfrau" at least a dozen times. And he employs a monochrome brush of the broadest possible size to paint the men in this book. Are we to believe after a few meetings at the Stepford Men's Association, every man is going to be sold into murdering his wife and turning her into a robot? There could have been so much more complexity and believability if we could have seen ANY thought process - any at all - on the part of the men, especially our main character's husband. Sadly, the end result is bland, underdeveloped and a little bit boring. As I said, the idea is brilliant. Ira Levin is the same man who brought us Rosemary's Baby. Based on these two books, it's safe to say Levin didn't have a great opinion of husbands, or neighbours either, for that matter! And it's equally safe to say this guy's imagination translated remarkably well to film. 3 stars for ideas that keep us thinking, decades later.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “I want to wish you a sincere and hearty ‘Welcome to Stepford.’” A quaint little hamlet nestled somewhere in Connecticut, Stepford is a place where you can buy your dream home for a mere $52,500 (obviously this book is kinda an oldie but a goodie), your children will attend Grade-A schools and have plenty of friends to play with, and your husband can unwind after a rough day at the office at the local Men’s Club . . . . . And how Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “I want to wish you a sincere and hearty ‘Welcome to Stepford.’” A quaint little hamlet nestled somewhere in Connecticut, Stepford is a place where you can buy your dream home for a mere $52,500 (obviously this book is kinda an oldie but a goodie), your children will attend Grade-A schools and have plenty of friends to play with, and your husband can unwind after a rough day at the office at the local Men’s Club . . . . . And how will you occupy your free time? Well, if you are even a halfway decent wife you won’t have much of it with all of the housekeeping you need to focus on. But on the off chance you do have a minute or two, it’s nice to find new products to test out while your husband is watching the big game . . . . . Walter and Joanna have just recently moved to Stepford. It should only take a few months for them to discover all of the amenities their new town has to offer, but hopefully sooner than that because poor Joanna . . . . . File this under “I can’t believe I never read this before now.” At less than 150 pages this is a tiny little nugget you can easily devour in one sitting. Aside from the aforementioned real estate prices and a couple of outdated pop culture references this 40+ year old novel withstands the test of time remarkably well. My husband should probably read this in order to figure out how to get me to be a little more like this . . . . . And not quite so much like this . . . . . Book #4 in my quest to obtain a new coffee mug from the Winter Reading Challenge!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ⚔️ Queen of Villainy ⚔️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Is this a feminist book? I just read this book called YOU PLAY THE GIRL, a book of essays about pop culture written through a feminist lens, and one of the essays was about Stepford Wives - I seem to recall the author juxtaposed it against the Desperate Housewives and writing a good deal about what it means to be a "housewife," whether you're a good one or a dysfunctional one. I really liked what the author had to say, and it actually mo Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest Is this a feminist book? I just read this book called YOU PLAY THE GIRL, a book of essays about pop culture written through a feminist lens, and one of the essays was about Stepford Wives - I seem to recall the author juxtaposed it against the Desperate Housewives and writing a good deal about what it means to be a "housewife," whether you're a good one or a dysfunctional one. I really liked what the author had to say, and it actually motivated me to go dig out my old copy of STEPFORD WIVES for a belated reread. ***WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD*** Disclaimer: I'm a feminist, so obviously I'm a little biased, but in my opinion, STEPFORD WIVES is a feminist book in the same vein as THE HANDMAID'S TALES. STEPFORD is set in the middle of the civil rights era, where Betty Friedan is giving her talks and NOW chapters are rallying for equal rights for women. Men, for the first time, are suddenly expected to share in the housework, and women are being empowered to seek out their own jobs and goals independent of marriage and children, becoming sexually and fiscally autonomous. One of the biggest issues that women continue to face is objectification. You see this a lot when sexist dudes talk about women, reducing them to their parts ("grab some p*ssy," "Tits or GTFO"), or talking about them as if they are trophies to be won for their accomplishments ("I'm such a nice guy, so why don't I have a girlfriend?"). It's gotten better, but not nearly as much as it should have, and one of the more chilling aspects for me is how modern STEPFORD WIVES feels, despite being published in 1972. I don't know about you, but it doesn't speak very highly towards our society that we're still being plagued by the same exact issues almost fifty years later. Especially since the chilling climax of this book is objectification in the ultimate sense: taking living, breathing women and replacing them with actual objects: in this case, robots. I've read this book several times over the course of my life, and with every reread I take something new from the text. I feel like I was able to appreciate it more this time because I've been reading more books about history and feminism, so I have a better appreciation for the zeitgeist of the time of this book's publication, and what the broader historical context behind it was. In fact, I would say STEPFORD WIVES actually improves with subsequent reads, because there are all these sinister hints that you pick up on while reading between the lines that make it even more terrifying. Examples: When Joanna first finds out about the Men's Association, she is against it. She expects her husband, who claims to be a feminist, will be, too, but he joins because "the only way to change it is from the inside" (6). The irony here is that the only changes being made on "the inside" are occurring within the context of her marriage: Walter sabotages Joanna so slowly that by the time she finally feels the noose tightening, it's already too late. After one of his Men's Association meetings, Walter comes home late and masturbates furiously in their bed, but acts ashamed when she catches him: His eye-whites looked at her and turned instantly away; all of him turned from her, and the tenting of the blanket at his groin was gone as she saw it, replaced by the shape of his hip (15). They have sex at her insistence, which ends up being "one of their best times ever - for her, at least" and she says, "What did they do...show you dirty movies or something?" (16). This is one of those moments where, in subsequent rereads, the reader wonders: did the members of the Men's Association indoctrinate Walter by showing him what they do to their wives, and did the possibilities of that excite him instead of horrifying him? Towards the end, after Bobbie, a friend to Walter and Joanna, "changes", Walter hesitates when it's time to say goodbye: Bobbie moved to Walter at the door and offered her cheek. He hesitated - Joanna wondered why - and pecked it (77). I took this to mean that Walter is thinking of his own wife's pending transformation and feeling guilt and uncertainty. Should he go through with it? When Joanna is worried about her friend, Walter has this to say: "There's nothing in the water, there's nothing in the air....They changed for exactly the reasons they told you: because they realized they'd been lazy and negligent. If Bobbie's taking an interest in her appearance, it's about time. It wouldn't hurt YOU to look in a mirror once in a while" (86). He goes on to say: "You're a very pretty woman and you don't do a damn thing with yourself any more unless there's a party or something" (86). That's when I felt like it became too late for Joanna. In the midst of her mental breakdown, she let herself - and the house - go, and Walter decided he didn't want to deal with that, any of it, anymore. Why settle for a flawed woman when you could have a perfect one? When Joanna tries to run away from the women and the men from the Men's Association corner her, they hunt her down like an animal and mock her fear. I took this to mean that the objectification was complete: they no longer saw her as human - they knew she was about to become a robot, and so to them, she was just a thing. What makes this even more ironic is when they say, "[W]e don't want ROBOTS for wives. We want real women" (114). Because I've heard so many men say similar things - that they want smart, clever, beautiful women...but there's always a qualifier. As long as they don't try too hard, as long as they aren't more successful than me, as long as they aren't shrill or know-it-all. The Men of Stepford want "real" women...but they also don't want flawed, forgetful women who sometimes let themselves go and don't want to do all the housework. They want the women of their fantasies made real: they want Pygmalion. "Suppose one of these women you think is a robot - suppose she was to cut herself on the finger, and bleed. Would THAT convince you she was a real person? Or would you say we made robots with blood under the skin?" (114) The ending of this book is depressing AF. I'm not sure what the message is, exactly, either - is it saying that men are inherently sexist and unwilling to move towards equality? Or is it a warning of the reductio ad absurdum variety of what objectification can lead to if left unchecked? And what of the children: are they going to groom their daughters to become robots when they come of age as well, marrying themselves off to the highest bidder? The story becomes even bleaker if you consider the possibilities. I took it as a warning, and a criticism of the patriarchy, but STEPFORD is open to so many possible interpretations, and I think that's what makes it such an interesting and lasting book. 3.5 stars

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shaina

    I read this a few years ago, but my review vanished. However; I only had one thing to say and that was “We wouldn’t want this to happen would we ? Or has it already in some places ...? “

  13. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X

    The Stepford Wives, a story of women who have no means of self-expression, might have been the story of real women in Jordan, Syria or Yemen. Women who are utterly controlled by their husbands but look quite normal, fashionable even as they no longer (have to) wear hijab. But it's the story instead of American women whose husbands would like to control them in the same way and, like Arab men, have no controls on themselves whatsoever. Unable to fulfil this desire in the usual ways of living, the The Stepford Wives, a story of women who have no means of self-expression, might have been the story of real women in Jordan, Syria or Yemen. Women who are utterly controlled by their husbands but look quite normal, fashionable even as they no longer (have to) wear hijab. But it's the story instead of American women whose husbands would like to control them in the same way and, like Arab men, have no controls on themselves whatsoever. Unable to fulfil this desire in the usual ways of living, they result to extremism. So the women are dehumanised in life and in the book. Although this is a good, light read from one point of view, what it says about the nature of the majority of men is not light at all. In Arab society there are men, a few, who do not like the strictures their women have to live under, but most do not object at all. Some seek to deepen it even unto the utter keeping of women as private pleasures and public invisibility as in Saudi Arabia, and some, with some success, seek to spread their control of women into our own societies. Ira Levin's book is as much a parable as it is entertainment. Edit. For those who think that this desire for control of women is not in the nature of the majority of men, I'm talking globally, not just of people living in a couple of rich, secular, emancipated countries in the world, although that said, that is where the book is set.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    From the writer who brought us Rosemary's Baby, which many readers have suggested is a feminist tale about the lack of control that a woman has even in a modern, urban society, The Stepford Wives offers an equally creepy and thought-provoking tale to a Satan baby - this one isn't set in New York City, but rather in an idyllic community that seems like it tumbled straight from the pages of a 1950's magazine. Ira Levin finds the underlying misogyny and horror beneath the manicured lawns and homema From the writer who brought us Rosemary's Baby, which many readers have suggested is a feminist tale about the lack of control that a woman has even in a modern, urban society, The Stepford Wives offers an equally creepy and thought-provoking tale to a Satan baby - this one isn't set in New York City, but rather in an idyllic community that seems like it tumbled straight from the pages of a 1950's magazine. Ira Levin finds the underlying misogyny and horror beneath the manicured lawns and homemade food, behind the wholesome Stepford Wives, and while sometimes it's extremely heavy-handed, it's still effective. Adapted into a 1970's film and later television show both under the same name, The Stepford Wives follows Joanna Eberhart and her family, who escape the liberal scene for a more quaint, rural area where everything is too perfect to be true. Joanna, a photographer who feels independent in spite of being a wife and mother, finds Stepford unsettling. While she does meet a kindred spirit in delightfully eccentric Bobbie, most of the other women in Stepford all share a similar mentality of obsessing wholly on housework, shopping, cooking and childcare, and none of them seem to differ from this narrative at all. Things begin to take an eerie turn when more and more gets to be revealed, including a secret men's only society that appears bizarrely organized and deep-rooted in every facet of the community. Sometimes the feminist points of this book are too on-the-nose, and the characters are black-and-white figures representing a narrative of oppression. Nevertheless, The Stepford Wives in its speculative style explores some dark, important themes of womanhood, social norms, gender roles, family values and progress within society and culture. It shows that while traditional values and norms can make for a much more aesthetically pleasant community, this is at risk to the freedom and personality of anyone who is different. Perhaps a bit dated in the 21st century (women wear leopard-print yoga pants, swear and curse in the street and go topless to the beach in my home city, so the Stepford scenario is implausible nowadays to me), but it's a haunting, genuinely creepy book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    When it all boils down you gonna find in the end A bitch is a bitch, but a dog is a man's best friend So what you found you a hoe that you like But you can't make a hoe a housewife Clearly Dr. Dre has never been to Stepford. You can make ANYONE a housewife there. In October 2011, I read Rosemary's Baby, and it was amazing. I'm glad that I read it before this one, though, because I feel like if I had read Stepford on its own, I might not have gotten as much out of it as I did, even though that's When it all boils down you gonna find in the end A bitch is a bitch, but a dog is a man's best friend So what you found you a hoe that you like But you can't make a hoe a housewife Clearly Dr. Dre has never been to Stepford. You can make ANYONE a housewife there. In October 2011, I read Rosemary's Baby, and it was amazing. I'm glad that I read it before this one, though, because I feel like if I had read Stepford on its own, I might not have gotten as much out of it as I did, even though that's still probably less than I should have. I feel like there was a pattern of behavior in the way that the two main character husbands behaved in these two books. Both move their wives/family into a seemingly perfect new home, with just the nicest neighbors. The Hubs fit in like a fish to water, but Wifey is... a little on the outside. Things just don't feel right, but Hubs is there to encourage her to keep on keepin' on, that everything's fine... And when that doesn't reassure Wifey, he starts with the manipulation: Maybe YOU'RE the problem. Everyone here is so nice, and you're the one making things difficult. Don't you want to fit in? Won't you even TRY? He plays on these wives' desires to compromise, to trust in their husband, to stand by that "love, honor, and obey" crap. They want to give it a chance, and not be unreasonable. And in the end, the wives are the ones who suffer. And it's this that makes Levin a genius. He writes from the perspective of the victims, the ones who lose in the battle they didn't know they were fighting, against the men they swore to stay with through thick and thin... and in doing so, he shows us how ordinary men can become almost evil in their aspirations and greed, and their deluded ideas of picture-perfect marriages. The very women they should be fighting to protect against outside threats are the ones they betray from the inside... and in such mundane fashion that it's THIS that makes these stories so terrifying. I mean, yes, there's the supernatural aspect - and the overall fate of these wives was awful... but the loss of trust, that's the scary thing. Levin's writing here was great, and just as straightforward as in Rosemary's Baby... but there were times when I felt that sections ended in an awkwardly abrupt way. As though there was another sentence to follow, but it was just forgotten. In fact, there were a few times when I had to check the page numbers in my copy (which is an old, well-read ex-library edition) to make sure that none of the pages were missing. It's for this that I can't give this one 5 stars. In every other aspect, it's completely deserving of it. The little details in this book are great, the things that only have significance after things come to a head and you are able to see the whole picture. (This is one of the things that I loved about Rosemary's Baby, as well.) I really enjoyed the repetitiveness in the newly Stepfordized ladies' explanations of their recent, err... attitude adjustments. It's creepily nearly verbatim, something that I noticed, but Joanna likely wouldn't have. I love the vagueness of the story, how we have Joanna's suspicions and theories, but nothing concrete... and we never really find out for sure, but we do know that she was right about the end result. I do wonder, though... How would this little community carry on like this? I mean, sure, it's a blast for a few years. Picture it: You get to hang with the dudes, play poker and watch porn all you like, no nagging wife at home to cramp your style, and even better, when you waltz in at 3:45 in the morning, smelling like a brewery and a cigar factory, Robo-Wife is there to do her nightly duty while you lay back and think of how perfect your life is. But they are very short-sighted. What happens in 5 or 6 years? Or 10? Or 15 and all the daughters are learning that their one role in life is to be a man's slave... Do these fathers want their daughters to end up married to guys like they've been? Do these fathers care that they are teaching their daughters to be nothing more than a cooking, cleaning, penis receptacle for some guy who can't be bothered to actually think of them as a person? Probably not. And considering that there are people in the world who really do think this way is terrifying. The moral here, ladies? Just buy a "personal massage device". They always satisfy, and can be disposed of when they go bad, unlike men. Well... legally, anyway. ;)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    The Stepford Wives / 9780062037602 "The Stepford Wives" is one of those rare horror novels that reads even more creepily when you already know the twist at the end. I read it when I was younger and merely liked it; now that I'm older and re-reading it, I find it absolutely terrifying. The most terrifying thing about the Stepford men isn't that they objectify their wives into sex-slaves and cleaning-bots; no, the most terrifying thing about the Stepford men is that they don't *seem* like the kind The Stepford Wives / 9780062037602 "The Stepford Wives" is one of those rare horror novels that reads even more creepily when you already know the twist at the end. I read it when I was younger and merely liked it; now that I'm older and re-reading it, I find it absolutely terrifying. The most terrifying thing about the Stepford men isn't that they objectify their wives into sex-slaves and cleaning-bots; no, the most terrifying thing about the Stepford men is that they don't *seem* like the kind of men who would do that sort of thing. They don't seem overly boorish or loutish or medieval in their thinking; the men help with the housework and give lip service to equality with their protestations that they intend to "change from the inside" the men-only Men's Association. Terrifying, too, is the fact that these men weren't somehow brought up believing that turning their wives into automatons is the right way to live; the Men's Association has been around for a mere six or seven years, and in that short time *every* man in Stepford has signed on to the barbaric replacement of their human wives with mindless servants. Not a single man in Stepford has refrained from turning his wife into an unthinking sex-bot, and based on Joanna's newspaper findings we cannot soothe ourselves with the thought that perhaps the more principled men moved away with their families. The men of Stepford are men who are sexist, but seem on the surface not to be. Joanna sits in on a meeting and at first enjoys the flow of the conversation, feeling she has struck a blow for women's equality; it is only when the men start treating her like an object (expecting her to wait on them, and drawing her as an object in the midst of their deliberations) that she starts to feel genuinely uncomfortable in their presence. When Joanna starts objecting to living in Stepford and fearing for her safety, her husband responds kindly and sensibly -- they will move, if that is what she wants, just as soon as the school year ends. This kind response lulls Joanna into dangerous complacency; because she believes her husband does care about her as an equal, she is willing to let precious time slip away, not realizing that her husband's reassurances are completely false. "The Stepford Wives" is a true horror story as it counts down inexorably to the end; it's impossible not to feel Joanna's heart-pounding terror as she tries to flee the town (an attempt that resonates all too well after having read Jessop's "Escape" earlier in the year). If there is a moral here, then perhaps it is that prejudices can be easily hidden and can arise from the most unlikely among us -- and that even the most liberated can be tempted to hurt and objectify another, when given the chance. ~ Ana Mardoll

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ria

    ‘’They never stop, these Stepford wives. They something something all their lives. Work like robots... They work like robots all their lives.’’ I just wanted to say that I liked the Stepford Wives 2004 remake. Fight me... the 1975 is obviously better tho. “What’s the going price for a stay-in-the-kitchen wife with big boobs and no demands?” It’s 2020 and there are still men who want a submissive housewife that will be hot, hair/nails/clothes on point every fucking day, will clean and cook ‘’They never stop, these Stepford wives. They something something all their lives. Work like robots... They work like robots all their lives.’’ I just wanted to say that I liked the Stepford Wives 2004 remake. Fight me... the 1975 is obviously better tho. “What’s the going price for a stay-in-the-kitchen wife with big boobs and no demands?” It’s 2020 and there are still men who want a submissive housewife that will be hot, hair/nails/clothes on point every fucking day, will clean and cook daily and will take care of their 2-3 kids without complaining. Just fuck a robot. It’s a relationship. Both parties need to make money and take care of the house… Look I know that there are women who want to be housewives *don’t get it, can’t convince me that they aren’t brainwashed into liking this shit by their parents* but why tho. I hate kids & can’t cook to save my life so what do I know. I’m a city girl. I could never live in the suburbs. It’s a satire of the irrational hatred people had *and honestly still do* for feminism & the women’ liberation movement. Some people just want family values. The woman to stay home, have 0 hobbies & have her life revolve around her husband and kids. I think that we can all agree that by the end of this less than 200 pages book you will get irritated & have the urge to stab someone.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    A very complex book: a commentary on the way we look at women and the role women have been assigned for centuries. The horrific aspect of the novel is that (in the end) the real question is: who really has lost their humanity?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    As Peter Straub points out in the introduction to this book, a lot of people miss the point. It is not "the easy satire on the banality of suburban housewives that it is commonly taken to be - a misconception that has installed its title in our language as shorthand for those homemakers who affect an uncanny perfection." This resulted in the fact that, after Ann Romney's recent speech at the RNC, I was asked whether I thought she was "like a Stepford Wife." No, she's not. For one thing, her voca As Peter Straub points out in the introduction to this book, a lot of people miss the point. It is not "the easy satire on the banality of suburban housewives that it is commonly taken to be - a misconception that has installed its title in our language as shorthand for those homemakers who affect an uncanny perfection." This resulted in the fact that, after Ann Romney's recent speech at the RNC, I was asked whether I thought she was "like a Stepford Wife." No, she's not. For one thing, her vocabulary is too large. But, more than that, referring to politically-active conservative women as Stepford wives undermines the feminist argument of this novella. The critical point here is that this novella is not a parody of the WOMEN of Stepford, it is a parody of their HUSBANDS. As with Rosemary's Baby, which is actually about Guy Wodehouse, not Rosemary or her baby, the title here is a deliberate distraction. This book is a humorous critique of the anti-feminist backlash that takes the anti-feminist slogan "War of the Sexes" at its word and suggests that men are so frightened by women's liberation that they will start executing them to prevent it. The fact that our narrator’s husband is “a good guy,” who – at first – treats his wife as an almost-equal only heightens the irony that, when offered a pleasure-android with bigger breasts who will keep the house meticulously clean, he is just as willing as all of the others to kill his own wife to get it. It was interesting to me to see how the book differs from the movie. Unlike most film-adaptations, several scenes have been added to the novella, and fairly little was cut, resulting in a rather long movie (for 1975 sci fi, anyway). There is even the addition of a surprising new character with the unlikely name of Raymond Chandler who isn't in the book. It also seems to me that the truth of the “Men’s Association” is lost in the film: that it isn’t a long-standing organization with an archaic membership policy, but it was a recent innovation founded to combat a growing feminist presence in Stepford after Betty Friedan gave a well-received speech. Also unusual for a film-adaptation, the movie has more explicit sexual references than the book does, and plays up that side of what the men are “up to” while the book leaves this largely to the reader’s imagination. At any rate, the premise of this book is disturbing, and it is intended to be. The prose is efficient and the pacing effective. At its short length, it is a quick read and may actually comment more deeply on American society than it is generally given credit for doing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

    Creepy, unsettling, horrific, made me want to sit and fume and hate men for a bit. This book is even scarier than the original movie, although the movie provides more background and explanation as to how the murderous bits would actually work. While some of the organizations and details in the story may be "dated," the core horror of this book is still -- and will always be -- with us: How well do you really know your significant other? If your husband could have the woman of his dreams, would he Creepy, unsettling, horrific, made me want to sit and fume and hate men for a bit. This book is even scarier than the original movie, although the movie provides more background and explanation as to how the murderous bits would actually work. While some of the organizations and details in the story may be "dated," the core horror of this book is still -- and will always be -- with us: How well do you really know your significant other? If your husband could have the woman of his dreams, would he betray you? It's those very real insecurities that power the fear in this tale. NOTE: If you get the edition with the introduction by Peter Straub do not read that intro first! Not only does he assume you've already read the story, he's pretty tone deaf when it comes to the issue of male/female relations. (view spoiler)[ He considered Walter masturbating at the thought of killing and replacing his wife "the funniest revelation" of the book. (hide spoiler)]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Zuky the BookBum

    I read this novel as my BookBum Club book for June. Check out my BookClub on the Goodreads Groups! I never normally read a lot of one author’s work, unless I feel there is something exceptional there. Last year, my favourite book was Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin, so I instantly wanted to pick his work back up again, but I got side-tracked. Finally, thanks to the wonderful Inside My Library Mind, I’ve picked up my second book of his, and wow, whaddya know? It’s another 5 star read! I am amazed at t I read this novel as my BookBum Club book for June. Check out my BookClub on the Goodreads Groups! I never normally read a lot of one author’s work, unless I feel there is something exceptional there. Last year, my favourite book was Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin, so I instantly wanted to pick his work back up again, but I got side-tracked. Finally, thanks to the wonderful Inside My Library Mind, I’ve picked up my second book of his, and wow, whaddya know? It’s another 5 star read! I am amazed at the skill of Levin’s writing. He’s one of those authors that doesn’t pepper his novel with the unnecessary, it’s very simply written but not in a juvenile way. It’s hard to explain but it’s the like Goldilocks zone for writing. It’s so easy to follow the story with no distractions but riveting enough to keep you interested. I was honestly breathless with fear and tension reading this novel. How is it that Levin could write so simply, yet produce so much emotion in his readers? Where Shirley Jackson is the Queen, Ira Levin is the King at writing about the mundane with an underlying sense of terror. As this book progresses, and Joanna begins to realise what is happening in her strange little community, there is a slow creeping sense of dread that comes along with it. As you’re both slowly enlightened, your stomach gets hollow with fear. The story in this novel is one pretty much everyone knows now, so reading this in the current age, the plot twist is predictable. However, you have to give Levin credit for basically inventing the creepy neighbourhood vibe that’s so prominent in books nowadays. There’s the twist, and then there’s the ending of this book, two totally different things and both equally as shocking. I love how Levin ends his books. Spoilers??? While I’ve only read two of Levin’s books, I can already see a trend in his work. Men are the bad guys. This was a really interesting (and dramatic) take on the rise of female empowerment and how it made some men feel in the 70’s. This is a really short book at just over 100 pages but it was an absolute rollercoaster! This isn’t a classic horror novel, but it’s very psychologically disturbing, similar to Rosemary’s Baby, although I feel like that one was more terrifying. I really cannot recommend picking up Levin’s work enough. He’s definitely a favourite author of mine.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Urges

    Everyone knows what a “Stepford Wife” is and what that entails. Due to popular culture it’s hard to avoid spoilers for this novel. Had I not already known the ending this would have been decently suspenseful. Levin has an interesting style. The Stepford Wives is worth the read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe Valdez

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "Satire" may be one of those words everyone has their own definition of. In terms of film, by two favorite satires are Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb and Network. In addition to being hysterically funny, I liked how credible they were, using a Life Magazine approach to document the world as it was at that time and then pushing it one step further. Ira Levin's The Stepford Wives is neither hysterically funny or plausible. Billed as a "satirical thriller", it "Satire" may be one of those words everyone has their own definition of. In terms of film, by two favorite satires are Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb and Network. In addition to being hysterically funny, I liked how credible they were, using a Life Magazine approach to document the world as it was at that time and then pushing it one step further. Ira Levin's The Stepford Wives is neither hysterically funny or plausible. Billed as a "satirical thriller", it was published in 1972 and has been adapted to feature film twice, by William Goldman in 1975 and Paul Rudnick in 2004. The plot involves Joanna Eberhardt, a semi-professional photographer who relocates to the hamlet of Stepford with her husband Walter and two children. Joanna balances married life with independence and social equality, as women's liberation sweeps the nation. She observes that almost all of the women of Stepford seem stuck in a TV commercial, cleaning floors, cooking meals, looking sexy, and putting their husbands first. Joanna sees red over the Men's Association, a male only club in Stepford that meet each evening at a clubhouse off limits to women. She finds it strange that Stepford doesn't have a female equivalent and agrees to let Walter join when he promises he'll change things from the inside. Meanwhile, she befriends the only women of Stepford who seem to have a brain; a spitfire named Bobbie Markowe and a tennis bunny named Charmaine Wimperis. Katharine Ross, Paula Prentiss and Tina Louise (Ginger from Gilligan's Island) took these roles in the film. If ever there was a novella that could've been scribbled on cocktail napkins, The Stepford Wives is it. There are airplane novels, but this is the first taxi cab novel I've read. The book could be finished on the way to the airport in time to discuss it with your fellow passengers. It's a conversation starter, with no two readers likely to agree on what was going on in Stepford, what happened to the characters or whether the women's movement might provoke some sort of retaliation from men. To grab me by the throat, a good thriller needs credibility on a basic level. Comic thrillers I've read or seen take their plots deadly seriously and spike the punchbowl with wit as needed to sort of have it both ways. Satire, a far more difficult brew, absolutely requires credibility to work, otherwise, it turns to farce or science fiction at best, cartoon at worst. Whatever The Stepford Wives is, Levin never grabbed me by the throat. There's no atmosphere, no dread or tension (so much for the book being a "thriller"). It isn't funny (that eliminates "satire"). The characters aren't endowed with the basic quirks or intelligences to make them interesting or real. What dialogue there is sort of lies there flatly, while Levin skips through a lot of dialogue or plot with quick summaries. I really can't stand joke based books. Here is something I might dislike even more, a one-joke based book. Here is Levin's joke: "What if men were so threatened by the women's movement that they murdered their wives and replaced them with, wait for it, robots! You know, like the audio-animatronic figures at Disneyland?" Levin devotes some copy to Joanna & Walter's sex life that offered a peek at who these characters were and where they were going to end up, and he raised my pulse a bit in the climax, which is creepy for a few sentences. I can honestly say that I was rooting for the robots at that point. As opposed to satire, I found the novel to be more in the category of "so bad it's good", except, it wasn't very good. It's superficial, lazy and boring. There are some amusing questions in the scenario Levin concocted, but the author doesn't have the imagination to explore any of them. Were husbands put in charge of murdering their own wives, or did Stepford hire a professional? Would the cops or family members or pets suspect something was amiss? How do the robots assimilate into society? What happens when one of them requires maintenance? Do HOA dues cover that, or is it extra? These questions and any possible answer is more amusing than anything offered in the book, which I found over-rated and under-developed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    The Stepford Wives is a 1972 novel by Ira Levin, according to what I've read it's a satirical thriller whatever that is. I know I'm going to have to go look that up, but in the meantime I'll say what little I have to say about the book. First, I didn't know it was a book. That rarely happens, usually I knew it as a book first then sometime later a movie comes out, which I never watch because the book was better. I just know it is, books are always better. But this one I saw as a movie way back i The Stepford Wives is a 1972 novel by Ira Levin, according to what I've read it's a satirical thriller whatever that is. I know I'm going to have to go look that up, but in the meantime I'll say what little I have to say about the book. First, I didn't know it was a book. That rarely happens, usually I knew it as a book first then sometime later a movie comes out, which I never watch because the book was better. I just know it is, books are always better. But this one I saw as a movie way back in 1970 something or other, and didn't link a book to it until recently. I don't know how it happened, but it did. From what I can remember, which isn't much, the movie stayed pretty close to the book, and I liked the book. It was fun. I was surprised early in the book that any man would want a wife who is always dressed like every other lady in the town, and who's conversations would have something to do with waxing floors, baking bread, and the best buys they got that day at the supermarket. You would have to get extremely bored in a very short time I would think, but I'm not a man living in Stepford. And I'm not big on housekeeping conversations. A few years ago while waiting for choir practice to begin some of the other women around me were talking about ironing and the best iron to use to do the ironing in the first place. This managed to turn into quite the conversation with everyone having an opinion on heat settings, to steam or not to steam, cooling, heating, all kinds of other iron topics and I sat there calmly looking through the music rather astonished these ladies could keep this conversation going. Finally, one lady decided it was time to draw me into the iron debate and asked what type of iron I use to which I replied, "white". That's all I knew about it and that's still all I know about it. Or want to. So, no, I wouldn't make a very good Stepford wife. A few days ago I came across something that seems to fit the Stepford wife, sort of an instruction manual. It's from the 1950's and if you want to try it out, here you go: The 1955 Good House Wife's Guide Rule 1 – Have dinner ready. Plan ahead, even the night before, to have a delicious meal ready, on time, for his return. This is a way of letting him know that you have been thinking about him, and are concerned about his needs. Most men are hungry when they come home, and the prospect of a good meal (especially his favorite dish) is part of the warm welcome needed. Rule 2 – Prepare yourself. Take 15 minutes to rest so you’ll be refreshed when he arrives. Touch up your make-up, put a ribbon in your hair, and be fresh-looking. He has just been with a lot of work-weary people. Rule 3 — Clear away the clutter. Make one last trip though the main part of the house just before your husband arrives. Rule 4 — Gather up schoolbooks, toys, paper etc. and then run a dust cloth over the tables. Rule 5 — Over the cooler months of the year, you should prepare and light a fire for him to unwind by. Your husband will feel he has reached a haven of rest and order, and it will give you a lift, too. After all, catering for his comfort will provide you with immense personal satisfaction. Rule 6 — Prepare the children. Take a few minutes to wash the children’s hands and faces (if they are small), comb their hair and, if necessary, change their clothes. They are little treasures, and he would like to see them playing the part. Minimize all noise. At the time of his arrival, eliminate all noise of the washer, dryer, and vacuum. Try to encourage the children to be quiet. Rule 7 — Be happy to see him. Rule 8 — Greet him with a warm smile and show sincerity in your desire to please him. Rule 9 — Listen to him. You may have a dozen important things to tell him, but the moment of his arrival is not the time. Let him talk first remember, his topics of conversation are more important than yours. Rule 10 — Make the evening his. Never complain if he comes home late, or goes out to dinner, or other places of entertainment without you. Instead, try to understand his world of strain and pressure and his very real need to be at home and relax. Rule 11 — Your goal: Try to make your home is a place of peace, order, and tranquility where your husband can renew himself in body and spirit. Rule 12 — Don’t complain if he comes home late to dinner, or even if he stays out all night. Compare this as minor compared to what he may have gone through that day. Rule 13 — Make him comfortable. Have him lean back in a comfortable chair or lie down in the bedroom. Have a cool or warm drink ready for him. Rule 14 — Arrange his pillow and offer to take off his shoes. Speak in a low, soothing and pleasant voice. Rule 15 — Don’t ask him questions about his actions or question his judgment or integrity. Remember, he is the master of the house, and as such, will always exercise his will with fairness and truthfulness. You have no right to question him. Rule 16 — A good wife always knows her place. I am almost tempted to try one or two of these things just to see the look on my husband's face when he comes home. Oh well, I guess I'll never be a Stepford wife. And that's all I have to say, back to reading. Oh, but first I have to go look up what a satirical thriller is. Happy reading.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carla Remy

    Like his Rosemary's Baby, this tells the story of a likeable wife being utterly betrayed by her own husband for his personal benefit. This is more sci fi, and here the conspiracy is bigger (the whole town!), but they both involve the husband using her body for his own happiness and success.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    It's so hard to rate this book. I've seen the 1975 film version. I knew what to expect from the plot, so it didn't have any real surprises for me. However, I do think the book is worth reading. It really needs to be read as a historical novel set in 1972, as I don't think it's as pertinent to how society is today - at least in the U.S. . I think it played on the concerns of women at that time, as their role in the family was starting to change. I think the book is alot more ambiguous than the fil It's so hard to rate this book. I've seen the 1975 film version. I knew what to expect from the plot, so it didn't have any real surprises for me. However, I do think the book is worth reading. It really needs to be read as a historical novel set in 1972, as I don't think it's as pertinent to how society is today - at least in the U.S. . I think it played on the concerns of women at that time, as their role in the family was starting to change. I think the book is alot more ambiguous than the film. We're shown so little of the men of the town, and when we do see them, they really aren't doing anything menacing or threatening. Everything is based on observing the women of Stepford and how they change. Although there is a change in Joanna at the end, we're not told conclusively how it came about, like we are shown in the film. But whether this change is due to madness or to a secret agenda by the men in the town, either explanation is frightening. Joanna is no longer who she was. A short but interesting read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    "Yes, I've changed. I realised I was being awfully sloppy and self-indulgent. It's no disgrace to be a good homemaker. I've decided to do my job conscientiously, the way Dave does his, and be more careful about my appearance." Ok, there's nothing subtle about this but it is a hilariously camp satire of small-town conservatism and its masculine backlash against 1960s feminism. It's no surprise to find Kate Millett and Betty Friedan name-checked within the narrative, and it's also a revealing p "Yes, I've changed. I realised I was being awfully sloppy and self-indulgent. It's no disgrace to be a good homemaker. I've decided to do my job conscientiously, the way Dave does his, and be more careful about my appearance." Ok, there's nothing subtle about this but it is a hilariously camp satire of small-town conservatism and its masculine backlash against 1960s feminism. It's no surprise to find Kate Millett and Betty Friedan name-checked within the narrative, and it's also a revealing portrait of a historicised ideal of womanhood (please tell me it's historicised...): beautiful, busty, empty-headed, obsessed with housework and domestic labour. It's interesting to note that Walter is changed by Stepford as much as Joanna, being acculturated into being a Stepford husband as a precursor to his wife's 'transformation'. (view spoiler)[ Are wives only changed once they have provided children for their husbands? We are shown that Joanna and Walter have a good sex life before, but what about after? (hide spoiler)] So this is short and sharp rather than deep but it still stands up nearly 50 years after it was published, however much gender roles may have progressed. The prose is straightforward, the narrative pacy and engaging, and there's an overblown simplicity about it that keeps the book entertainingly edgy and pointed rather than preachy.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessica-Robyn

    It first hit me on page 81, I was bored. So very, very bored. My main problem and probably the reason I'm so disappointed can be summed up this way, on the back of the book there is this a praise by Stephen King: "Every novel [Ira Levin] has ever written has been a marvel of plotting. He is the Swiss watchmaker of the suspense novel." - Stephen King I absolutely agree that Ira Levin is an amazing writer and to have come up with and popularized this story I give him full credit and praise. However It first hit me on page 81, I was bored. So very, very bored. My main problem and probably the reason I'm so disappointed can be summed up this way, on the back of the book there is this a praise by Stephen King: "Every novel [Ira Levin] has ever written has been a marvel of plotting. He is the Swiss watchmaker of the suspense novel." - Stephen King I absolutely agree that Ira Levin is an amazing writer and to have come up with and popularized this story I give him full credit and praise. However, even the best of Swiss watches can't compare to an iPhone. ...I think it is safe to assume that I am part of the generation that has felt the trickle down of this novel and such social commentary on women's issues throughout my popular culture. This made the major draw of the book, the chilling implications of a woman's struggle in society, more of a mute point for me. For the first 50 or so pages I enjoyed reading the narrative of a stay-at-home mother who had just moved to a suburb town called Stepford. The story takes place as she tries to balance the responsibilities of self, husband, and home while looking dubiously upon her neighbours who behave as 1950's housewives and lack all facets of personality. That right there was interesting, the plot was interesting! And having seen the 2004 movie I had the unspoken promise that I already had a general idea of where the plot would go (only general because the movie was remake.) But then it hit me, by page 81 I was ready to be done with Stepford. Suspense as a genre is all about the build up, creating tension and interest where there may or may not be something afoot and although The Stepford Wives has this excellent concept and is well written, gradually the book transformed from a novel to what felt like a very, very long short story. (Perhaps it is more of a novella?) I expected more, maybe too much but I at least expected to not feel like a book that is less then 130 pages to drag on. I found that the ending although smart and suspenseful just wasn't worth it. A definite disappointment.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan's Reviews

    My goodness, I read this so, so long ago. Being the staunch feminist that I was and still am, I was furious at the ending. Since then, I have never liked negative or hopeless endings. Still, very well written, and Ira Levin was a master of the game back then.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate (GirlReading)

    A super fun, quick and easy read. I wish I had gone into it not knowing what it was about, as it meant the majority of the suspense and the ‘big reveal’ were a little wasted on me but it was nonetheless an entertaining read and I’m now super intrigued to watch the movie adaptations, as I’m hoping they will add a depth to the plot I felt this was slightly lacking in.

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