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Invisible Monsters

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Author: Chuck Palahniuk

Published: May 1st 2018 by W. W. Norton Company (first published September 17th 1999)

Format: Paperback , 304 pages

Isbn: 9780393355956

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She's a catwalk model who has everything: a boyfriend, a career, a loyal best friend. But when a sudden motor 'accident' leaves her disfigured and incapable of speech, she goes from being the beautiful centre of attention to being an invisible monster, so hideous that no one will acknowledge she exists. Enter Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, one operation away from being a She's a catwalk model who has everything: a boyfriend, a career, a loyal best friend. But when a sudden motor 'accident' leaves her disfigured and incapable of speech, she goes from being the beautiful centre of attention to being an invisible monster, so hideous that no one will acknowledge she exists. Enter Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, one operation away from being a real woman, who will teach her that reinventing yourself means erasing your past and making up something better, and that salvation hides in the last place you'll ever want to look. The narrator must exact revenge upon Evie, her best friend and fellow model; kidnap Manus, her two-timing ex-boyfriend; and hit the road with Brandy in search of a brand-new past, present and future.

30 review for Invisible Monsters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Quite possibly the most fucked up piece of literature I’ve ever read, this novel is a brilliantly executed train wreck from beginning to end.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    It made me want to blow my own jaw off...but in a good way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Check the shelf I put this on. Now you're ready: This book is insane. There's something on practically every page that makes you say, "What the *%$#!?" You'll keep reading anyway, though, and you'll love it. The book's like a really hard-core Swedish massage. It hurts SOOOOO good. The story is essentially about beauty: who values it, what it means, how it can be good, and how it can be a horror. Not only do the characters suffer FOR beauty, they suffer BECAUSE of beauty, and that's a powerful co Check the shelf I put this on. Now you're ready: This book is insane. There's something on practically every page that makes you say, "What the *%$#!?" You'll keep reading anyway, though, and you'll love it. The book's like a really hard-core Swedish massage. It hurts SOOOOO good. The story is essentially about beauty: who values it, what it means, how it can be good, and how it can be a horror. Not only do the characters suffer FOR beauty, they suffer BECAUSE of beauty, and that's a powerful comment on current American society. Palahniuk shows off masterful writing all the way through, allowing the reader to both like and dislike, agree and disagree with all of the characters. He lays pathos out before his readers and expects us to have the capacity and intelligence to simultaneously exalt and suffer, and that's powerful stuff. If you don't have a firm grip on your sanity, a good sense of humor, and an expansive sense of the ridiculousness that is humanity, don't bother with this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    B Haze

    I have a theory about Chuck Palahniuk books. If somebody is starting to read Chuck Palahniuk for the first time...the first book they read of his will always be their favorite. I have found that to be the case with many people. I really enjoyed Invisible Monsters and it was the first Chuck Palahniuk book I read. It was such a new approach to writing that I had never seen before, and I found myself really engrossed and moved by the now-usual Palahniuk twisty ending. It was such a shocking book to I have a theory about Chuck Palahniuk books. If somebody is starting to read Chuck Palahniuk for the first time...the first book they read of his will always be their favorite. I have found that to be the case with many people. I really enjoyed Invisible Monsters and it was the first Chuck Palahniuk book I read. It was such a new approach to writing that I had never seen before, and I found myself really engrossed and moved by the now-usual Palahniuk twisty ending. It was such a shocking book to me that I loved every page of it. Of course, since, I have read Chuck Palahniuk books that I could consider to be better, but the initial shock of this book on me has kept it the one I've liked the most. A lot of people I have talked to really don't like this book of Palahniuk's, but I think that is probably because they didn't read it first.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    I'm too old for this stuff. Shocking doesn't do it for me alone, and he works SO VERY HARD at being vulgar and violent and crass. Don't get me wrong; those are three things that can make for a great story. But it was so unrelenting and contrived, and not as funny as it was supposed to be. There were some clever turns of phrase, and it wasn't entirely unenjoyable, but I was not really impressed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Derrick

    It very seriously makes me sad that there are people that haven't read Invisible Monsters. Invisible Monsters is the most amazing work of art I have ever experienced and reading it for the 3rd time was the best decision I have made this summer. Of course, this is the remix version, so it was different than the original Invisible Monsters but mainly just in the formatting and some added chapters. * If you haven't read Invisible Monsters before and you decide to read it, I would recommend the ori It very seriously makes me sad that there are people that haven't read Invisible Monsters. Invisible Monsters is the most amazing work of art I have ever experienced and reading it for the 3rd time was the best decision I have made this summer. Of course, this is the remix version, so it was different than the original Invisible Monsters but mainly just in the formatting and some added chapters. * If you haven't read Invisible Monsters before and you decide to read it, I would recommend the original version. This version was Chuck Palahniuk's original vision for this novel. It reads like a Vogue. At the end of the prologue it says, "Now, Please, Jump to Chapter Forty-One." So you flip to page 284. Then turn jump to chapter 1,40, and so on and so on so that you you are going back and forth after each chapter. And when you finish the book you realize that there are still chapters left that you didn't read. There's 6 chapters actually that aren't really part of the main story. And two of the chapters are published with flipped text so that you have to put the book up to a mirror in order to read them. All of his 'gimmicks' make sense and are really interesting but maybe I'm just a lazy reader because I thought it kind of detracted from the reading experience. Some of the extra chapters were short 'stories' on a few of the characters and some of them told more about Chuck's background and his experience writing Invisible Monsters years ago. * I did like that this edition was hardcover and even if the chapter jumping wasn't my favorite thing to do, I like his ideas and I like the fact that he'll do something different. * Ultimately, this is the best book ever (other than the original version), and reading Invisible Monsters for the first time was one of the most significant points in my life and led to so much for me. Edit: Sorry, there are a few more extra chapters than I originally thought, so make sure to look through the book a few times for all the extra chapters I guess.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris_P

    Jump to me reviewing Palahniuk's Invisible Monsters. If mindfuck was a genre, this would be one of its most characteristic works. Palahniuk states at the introduction that it won't be linear, the story won't be in the form of and then and then and then. So what he does is at the end of each chapter he tells you to please, jump to this or that chapter. It was a first for me having only a vague idea of my progress in a book. As for the plot, it's better to not know anything before reading it. Palah Jump to me reviewing Palahniuk's Invisible Monsters. If mindfuck was a genre, this would be one of its most characteristic works. Palahniuk states at the introduction that it won't be linear, the story won't be in the form of and then and then and then. So what he does is at the end of each chapter he tells you to please, jump to this or that chapter. It was a first for me having only a vague idea of my progress in a book. As for the plot, it's better to not know anything before reading it. Palahniuk draws his characters as caricatures but that is not a problem at all because that is simply not the point. Besides, the type of people he describes, are little more than caricatures in real life too. Invisible Monsters is nihilistic and cruel, while sensitive and deep at the same time. The point of it is not as simple as one may initially think. On the contrary, it has many sides, all of which are touched in multiple ways and in all possible manners. Nothing better than a book which describes the most extreme dysfunctionalities modern society brings about, in such a delicate and unpretentious manner. This part from the intro says a lot: Nowadays, whatever purchase you moon over, whatever person you lust after, most likely it’s presented on a smooth glass or plastic screen. On a laptop or a television. And no matter what the technology, you’ll catch sight of your own reflection. In that electric mirror, there hovers your faint image. You’ll be superimposed over every email. Or, lurking in the glassy surface of online porn, there you are. Fewer people shut down their computers anymore, and who can blame them? The moment that monitor goes black, you’re looking at yourself, not smiling, not anything. Here’s your worst-ever passport photo enlarged to life size. Swimming behind the eBook words of Jane Austen, that slack, dead-eyed zombie face, that’s yours. That’s you. Now, Please, Jump into the river and die with me (The End)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    This is, and always will be, one of my favourite Palahniuk books. Something about it just grabs me by the throat, punches me in the throat and leaves me breathless! I love how truly fucked up and twisted this story is, no one does fucked up and twisted quite like Chuck does! It’s been years since I’ve read this book so I had forgotten most of the story and it was like I was reading it again for the first time and it reminded me why I love Palahniuk’s writing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cassie-la

    REVIEW ALSO ON: http://bibliomantics.com/2012/06/01/a...... We’ve all seen extended edition and director’s cuts of movies, but this is the first time I have ever come across an author’s cut of a book. With this hardcover release of Chuck Palahniuk’s third published novel (but his first in terms of writing), he took the opportunity to change the linear format that was originally published in 1999 and release it the way he initially envisioned it. The intention was to give the reader the feel of li REVIEW ALSO ON: http://bibliomantics.com/2012/06/01/a...... We’ve all seen extended edition and director’s cuts of movies, but this is the first time I have ever come across an author’s cut of a book. With this hardcover release of Chuck Palahniuk’s third published novel (but his first in terms of writing), he took the opportunity to change the linear format that was originally published in 1999 and release it the way he initially envisioned it. The intention was to give the reader the feel of literally getting lost inside the book, as one would be with a Vogue magazine. Which you have to admit is kind of perfect for a novel centered around beauty, perceptions, and transformation. Sadly no Madonna songs though. So how exactly is this achieved? The narrative flips the reader around from chapter to chapter (41, 1, 40, 2, 39, 4, 38, 5, 37, 6, etc.) with the instructions at the end of each chapter to, “Now, Please Jump to Chapter …” So polite. This makes things intriguing, because unlike in a typical book where a dwindling number of pages signal the end is coming, you don’t know exactly when Invisible Monsters Remixwill reach its climax. And as with the original Invisible Monsters, the narrative itself skips around in time, so you will be well and truly lost in the events while you read. It’s a non-linear format inside a non-linear format, a mirror image. It couldn’t be produced as intended initially, but now at least it can be read and enjoyed by Chuck’s legion of fans. One downside to this format, is that you might inadvertently see key bits of information as you flip through from chapter to chapter. This will lead you to wonder exactly how the narrative could lead there, so at least it’s not a total spoiler. Think of it as a darker version of “How I Met Your Mother”, but more akin to, “How I Lost My Face”. Page numbers would probably be easier for a reader to navigate from place to place, but I imagine it would be a logistics nightmare in terms of publishing every time the book gets re-released or the format is changed. This way at least is manageable for everyone except the dyslexics, but let’s be honest, page numbers would be even more difficult to follow. While the original novel was published in a straightforward manner to please readers and make it more marketable, this version is Palahniuk’s original vision. Due to this, in addition to jumping around from chapter to chapter, there are also additional chapters outside this “straightforward” narrative. Twelve to be exact, split up into three sections which instruct the reader to loop between chapters over and over again. For example chapter 3 to chapter 16 to chapter 30 to chapter 3. Lather, rinse, repeat. Even after you’re done with the main story there’s even more to discover. We’re back to the Vogue magazine idea here. Most of these side stories deal with the process of revision and re-imagining famous movies, as Chuck did with this novel, while others detail where our narrator is now (after her story). These sections are all new additions to the original novel, and some chapters are even written backwards, forcing you to read the words in a mirror. It’s a pain, but there is a purpose about reflections and mirrors and being forced to look at yourself while you read. You’re reading while watching yourself read while you read… You get the picture. It’s the idea of multiple reflections which function the same as the chapters that repeat on a loop. Where does it all begin and end? So many moebius strips, so little time. The third and most interesting of these narrative diversions contains biographical stories about Chuck’s own life. There are three separate stories in this loop, one which deals with a road trip that inspired this novel, one about when he was writing his first manuscript, and a third about being on set for the film of his novel turned movie, Choke. Since the fictional story deals so much with impossible sounding coincidences (even though our world is a small one), Chuck shares some of his own coincidences in these stories, from a shared memory between him and a friend he hadn’t met yet, to the death of the mother he wrote about correlating to his own mother’s death, and all the coincidences in between. They’re poignant, beautiful, and most importantly true. As with most of Chuck P. novels, there is a repetitive element throughout the narrative. Where in Fight Club it was “I am Jack’s” insert organ of the body here (my personal favorite is “raging bile duct”), this story also has a similar narrative trick. In this novel, weaved throughout is the flash of a camera taking photos with a wide variety of emotions being yelled out as if by a fashion photographer. The most memorable line being, “Give me lust, baby. Flash. Give me malice. Flash. Give me detached existentialist ennui. Flash.” There are also paragraphs starting with the phrase, “Jump to…” to tell the reader that the story is once again jumping in time and location. Spoiler alert: this happens more than in a “Doctor Who” episode. There are plenty of reasons why this new structure works so well in this choose your own adventure type chapter hopping format, but I appreciate it even more for what it says about life. The end of a book generally doesn’t signal the end of a character’s life, unless you’re reading a historical fiction novel, and Palahniuk knows that. So rather than bring the end of the narrator’s story to the end of the novel, he wisely ends it somewhere in the middle, where stories generally leave their protagonists on their journey through life. Bravo on that Chuck.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    It was a long time ago I read the original version so I can't say for sure on what was added material. Again I feel like I lost out on some of the experience by going audiobook instead of physical book...in the audiobook it would have you switch to a different disc and track where I'm assuming the paper book would have had you go to a different page. I did like the almost wandering feeling of not knowing how far through the book I was. As always with my #1 fav author, absolutely wild ride, never It was a long time ago I read the original version so I can't say for sure on what was added material. Again I feel like I lost out on some of the experience by going audiobook instead of physical book...in the audiobook it would have you switch to a different disc and track where I'm assuming the paper book would have had you go to a different page. I did like the almost wandering feeling of not knowing how far through the book I was. As always with my #1 fav author, absolutely wild ride, never a dull moment and just a freaking awesome read for anyone, especially if you feel like a f*&* the world vibe. 😙

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Chuck Palahnuik’s Invisible Monsters has many similarities to Fight Club and clear influences from Sartre and John Barth. It’s disjointed, fragmented, almost incomplete, and yet, he raises complex questions and makes brilliant observations. I don’t think he is so much nihilistic as he is post-modern and just doesn’t believe in culture de jour, readily satirizing at what needs to be poked fun. Chuck Palahnuik’s Invisible Monsters has many similarities to Fight Club and clear influences from Sartre and John Barth. It’s disjointed, fragmented, almost incomplete, and yet, he raises complex questions and makes brilliant observations. I don’t think he is so much nihilistic as he is post-modern and just doesn’t believe in culture de jour, readily satirizing at what needs to be poked fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chaunceton Bird

    Without question one of Chuck's best.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Miko

    ****DO NOT LOOK THIS UP IN WIKIPEDIA IT GIVES AWAY EVERYTHING I REPEAT DO NOT LOOK IT UP! In fact, don't even read the synopsis, I would just dive right in knowing nothing.**** THE START: So far it is pretty good. It says right from the start that you are going to read this book feeling like you are missing things and it's very true. I am having a hard time holding on to any solid plot but am captivated from what I can grasp. It's the same author that wrote Fight Club and it kind of has that same ****DO NOT LOOK THIS UP IN WIKIPEDIA IT GIVES AWAY EVERYTHING I REPEAT DO NOT LOOK IT UP! In fact, don't even read the synopsis, I would just dive right in knowing nothing.**** THE START: So far it is pretty good. It says right from the start that you are going to read this book feeling like you are missing things and it's very true. I am having a hard time holding on to any solid plot but am captivated from what I can grasp. It's the same author that wrote Fight Club and it kind of has that same feel where certian things happen and you're like, "wait what just happned, what did I miss?" when in reality you didn't miss anything, nothing has been revealed yet they are just going on in the plot as if you know it already. Only about 1/4 into it to follow! (This is a FABULOUS idea ps!) UPDATE: So I am now 3/4 of the way through and it is all(finally!) starting to come together. I feel like I am going to have to re-read it now that I am starting grasp the plot and characters(yes, it really is that confusing!) It's a trip. I have to say I am relieved that it IS starting to make sense. When explaning how ramdom it was to people I used the movie Mulholland Drive to give an example. The thing is, that movie never ended up making any sense(at least to me)so while read I was concerned it was just going to be this artsy "deep" book left up for interpretation that I wasn't cool enough (or drugged up enough)to understand. Don't get me wrong still a very weird book but highly entertaining. I recommend that you read it carefully and try to remember details even if you don't understand it at the time. Almost done! FINALE: WOW! I did NOT see that coming! If you are reading this and are going to now read the book I say again, pay attention! I am going to re-read the book now that I know where all the pieces go! I felt like I was watching a movie with a big black bar going through the middle and now it has been lifted and I want to watch it again. It was good, different, but good! I would have given it 4.5 stars if that was available. Well done! ****I also just read that they are turning this book into a movie to release late this year sweet!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Char

    I listened to this book on audio. This was such a strange story, I am at a loss for words. The narrators were fantastic, especially Anna Fields. (Chuck P. himself was one of them). This story jumps all over the place and it takes a while to get a feel for what's happening. This audio book came with a link to a pdf file explaining how there are are 4 different loops to follow, and the instructions on how to do that. Or, you can just listen-after each portion, a narrator pops on and tells you where I listened to this book on audio. This was such a strange story, I am at a loss for words. The narrators were fantastic, especially Anna Fields. (Chuck P. himself was one of them). This story jumps all over the place and it takes a while to get a feel for what's happening. This audio book came with a link to a pdf file explaining how there are are 4 different loops to follow, and the instructions on how to do that. Or, you can just listen-after each portion, a narrator pops on and tells you where to go next. I just listened to it straight through. It's about a model that now has no face. Her name is ..well there's a choice of 3. Her life is unimaginable. It's somewhat realistic, it's all out hilarious, but it's also poignant at times. Especially the 4 times Chuck himself narrated. These parts were interesting because he talked about other things going on his life-I liked these sections the best. So this book has a non linear story with lots of graphic violence, language, thievery, sex and lots of drugs. You definitely want to listen on ear buds and not out loud. Trust me on this. This was a totally crazy, unique, in your face, fun read and I liked it a lot! Highly recommended!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If I told you that Invisible Monsters was supposed to be Chuck Palahniuk’s first novel, before Fight Club were to ever happen, but was rejected by publishers for being too disturbing, would you believe me? Countless people have found themselves falling head over heals in love with this novel to the point of calling it Palahniuk’s best work of fiction and their own favourite book of all time. While Fight Club became a world-wide classic piece of You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. If I told you that Invisible Monsters was supposed to be Chuck Palahniuk’s first novel, before Fight Club were to ever happen, but was rejected by publishers for being too disturbing, would you believe me? Countless people have found themselves falling head over heals in love with this novel to the point of calling it Palahniuk’s best work of fiction and their own favourite book of all time. While Fight Club became a world-wide classic piece of literature and one of the most critically-acclaimed masterpiece in cinema, Invisible Monsters has all the ingredients necessary to blow your minds away just as effortlessly. The story is told by an unnamed narrator who’s had a freak accident on the highway that left her face horribly disfigured (goodbye jaw). Once a fashion model that caught the eye of every individual that crossed paths with her, now she struggles to be seen and loses sight of her own purpose in life. It’s upon meeting Brandy Alexander, also known as the Queen Supreme, a woman who undergoes more surgeries than you could count on your fingers to become the most beautiful woman alive, that the narrator learns some of the most valuable lessons regarding identity and love. Invisible Monsters is not your ordinary novel. It is one of the most artistic and unorthodox work of fiction that you’ll ever come across in a sea of books. Invisible Monsters is a chef d’oeuvre. It’s impossible to exit the stage without feeling completely overwhelmed by the story that was smacked into you. This is without a doubt the most f*ked up story I’ve ever read. Pardon my language, but there’s no better way to describe this book. May you be warned that the plot twists are uncountable and unforeseeable. As soon as you think that the biggest surprise was conveyed, expect to be struck by a shower of thunderous twists that are not only there to mess with your thoughts, but to convey a subtle, but strong message. Whether it is a desire to showcase the insanity of excess or the consumption of passion, Chuck Palahniuk invites you on a journey that one would never have thought possible. There’s very strong humor that borders satire throughout the whole story that leaves a very satisfied impression until the very end. Invisible Monsters can also easily be classified as a transgressive fiction that touches upon a grand array of themes, from love (self and others), identity, attention, beauty and sexuality. With characters that defy conventionality to lay out the pieces to a self indulged in freedom, Invisible Monsters is a true artistic creation of visceral and unshackled creativity. Nothing is what it seems. It’s where you’ll find beauty with this book. It has such an aggressively deceptive writing, you sometimes feel so immersed that you just can’t help but focus on what is told instead of looking wider, and sometimes even behind, to see the truck coming. The plot devices used by Chuck Palahniuk in this book are also some of the most original and truly fitting aspects. One of the recurring devices used throughout the book is when the narrator pretends to be in a photo shoot and the text looks like this: “Give me attention. Flash. Give me adoration. Flash.” I truly enjoyed these little bits that occur randomly and unexpectedly. They not only remind of us about the narrators past (before the tragic event) but also adds this humouristic touch to the whole narrative. Furthermore, to heighten the brilliance in the writing, repetition is scattered throughout the novel in a cleverly fashion. While it is easy to find yourself annoyed by the writing, I found myself pleased and immensely intrigued by the direction and decisions. I’ve never known Chuck Palahniuk to stick with a shtick, but to rather experiment and explore, and that’s what I got from Invisible Monsters. It is a novel that struck me with originality and with the never-before-seen. Another element which I thought was less evident—since Chuck Palahniuk had to settle with a revised edition of this book—is how the story does not possess a classic sequential structure. No, no, no. Invisible Monsters has a continuity intertwined within multiple pasts. As you read, the narrator says “Jump to when…” to put you in a completely different moment in the life of a character. This is something that Chuck Palahniuk wants you to embrace and get used to as life is never about the predictable but always about the unexpected and sudden moments. Quickly you’ll realize that even with such a choppy progression, you’ll still be able to feel a certain temporal continuity. The best part is how parts and segments feel so irrelevant when taken in at face value, but later become hints and clues, only to become irrefutably pertinent. The flashback scenes also give us glimpse into the character’s own life and offers us the opportunity to contrast the past with the present. A huge deal of character development is easily observable through this particular style of narration. After all, a protagonist that had everything going for her until a tragic event shifted her life onto a downhill slope is a protagonist that is bound to rethink some of the most fundamental elements of her life. That’s where the Queen Supreme serves as an enabler and a model to what is to come. As I hinted earlier, this revised edition that was released after initially being rejected by publishers is not how Chuck Palahniuk intended his story to be. A much more sophisticated edition was later released under the name of Invisible Monsters Remix. Remember when I said the narrator would make you jump from one moment in time to another? Well, Invisible Monsters Remix pushes the idea even further and shuffles these sections of the story and adds: “Turn to page …” This much more cumbersome structure makes sure to remind you that this book is supposed to be read like a fashion magazine with the most random images and advertisements popping out the blue. While I haven’t tried this version of the book yet, I am truly curious to what the reading experience would be like, especially with the number of insane twists that are sprinkled throughout this book. I hear there are even hidden chapters that aren’t part of the sequence that are written upside down, as in, you’d need a mirror to read it. Invisible Monsters remains one of Chuck Palahniuk’s greatest books. It tackles conventions related to beauty and love in a unique and brilliant fashion. It is filled with plot twists enough to rattle you to the core, and even drown you in awe. If you’re feeling adventurous and are curious about where you could find your next alarming, messed up and disturbing story, need look no further. Give me unique. Flash. Give me unpredictable. Flash. Give me a masterpiece, baby. Flash. Jump to Invisible Monsters. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/ ____________________________ Such a chef d'oeuvre. This was one hell of a fucked up story by Chuck Palahniuk. The writing is ingenious and the use of multiple timelines to tell a deceptive story was brilliant. This book contains so much controversy and raises so many questions on attention, beauty, identity and love (self and others). The best part of all this are the plot twists. You think the first one would be enough, but Palahniuk ruthlessly throws you an avalanche of plot twists that never ceases to amaze you. By the end, every dot is connected and the messages are delivered with a bang. What a book. P.S. Full review to come Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nick Younker

    Clearly, there’s a fine line between knowing your shit and knowing you’re shit. Our boy Chuck knows his shit, and our girl, who remains unnamed until the final few pages, knows she’s shit. It’s a critical satire about the population at large that envies the glam of modeling and the clueless models who run it. To be honest, at times, I started to get bored with the content. But Chucky-boy and his trademark style kept my eyes open and the pages turning. “Just what the hell is he going to say next? Clearly, there’s a fine line between knowing your shit and knowing you’re shit. Our boy Chuck knows his shit, and our girl, who remains unnamed until the final few pages, knows she’s shit. It’s a critical satire about the population at large that envies the glam of modeling and the clueless models who run it. To be honest, at times, I started to get bored with the content. But Chucky-boy and his trademark style kept my eyes open and the pages turning. “Just what the hell is he going to say next?” It gets four-stars for his patented style and a fraction of a star for content. I can’t go into more detail without spoiling an unspoilable story. If you like Chuck, this is a roll of the dice.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mallory

    I hadn't read Invisible Monsters for years, so I was really excited to see the "director's cut" of the book listed on Goodreads FirstReads, and even more excited when I won a free copy for review purposes. Chuck Palahnuik never ceases to fill me with a sense of wonder and a sense of dread. It must be really, really frightening to live inside his brain. There are a few major changes from the original text to the "remixed" version, but you could read either. The story seemed mostly the same, with t I hadn't read Invisible Monsters for years, so I was really excited to see the "director's cut" of the book listed on Goodreads FirstReads, and even more excited when I won a free copy for review purposes. Chuck Palahnuik never ceases to fill me with a sense of wonder and a sense of dread. It must be really, really frightening to live inside his brain. There are a few major changes from the original text to the "remixed" version, but you could read either. The story seemed mostly the same, with the major difference of being forced to skip from chapter to chapter like being trapped in some sort of deranged Choose-Your-Own-Adventure novel in which there was only one choice. And as compelled as you will find yourself to keep reading, you will often be unhappy with the choice. Palahnuik forces us to consider the nature of beauty and what it means to truly be oneself. This is not a new theme for the author--in fact, Invisible Monsters was his first novel--but it remains an important one. Palahnuik creates characters who I am strangely drawn to as a reader, and it can be painful to watch them self-destruct over the course of his pages. Interestingly, however, (and perhaps because I've read more of his works, which have bleaker endings) I found this one more uplifting than I had originally mentioned it, with a slight chance for some salvation at the end. And while it may seem depressing to indicate that the only true way to be who you are is to construct your own reality, I take it back to the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure motif; Make your own way, and you'll be OK. And then there was the new stuff! Extra chapters, hidden throughout the narrative (if I hadn't noticed some backward text I might have missed it completely, not thinking to mark chapters as I read them) give new tidbits about the characters and the author himself. Overall, such a fun experience to read (if a little frustrating and unnerving as a reader to never know where in the narrative you were or if you were getting all the information you should!) and highly recommended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    “If I can't be beautiful, then I just want to be invisible.” Chuck Palahniuk is a truly unique and twisted individual. He also seems to be a bit hit or miss with me. I have come to the conclusion that timing may be everything for a Palahniuk read. Invisible Monsters has it all. Pretzel plotting, biting wit, uber-bizarre characterizations, scathing sarcasms, all wrapped up in a non-linear format that was either going to suck balls or be utterly brilliant. I’m going with brilliant. Geesh piercing, “If I can't be beautiful, then I just want to be invisible.” Chuck Palahniuk is a truly unique and twisted individual. He also seems to be a bit hit or miss with me. I have come to the conclusion that timing may be everything for a Palahniuk read. Invisible Monsters has it all. Pretzel plotting, biting wit, uber-bizarre characterizations, scathing sarcasms, all wrapped up in a non-linear format that was either going to suck balls or be utterly brilliant. I’m going with brilliant. Geesh piercing, Manus’s man mags, vaginoplasty, face eating birds, 46" of silicon glory, and The Elephant Man’s jazz hands. Flash! “Wear a Veil. It's lingerie for your face.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Chuck Palahniuk is the hugely popular author of modern, edgy books like Fight Club (also a movie with Brad Pitt--go ahead, act surprised) and Choke. For this reason I did not expect to like Invisible Monsters, originally published in 1999. The story is told by a nameless narrator: a young woman who used to be beautiful. After a series of bizarre, haunting events involving a freeway, birds and a few other things those days are gone forever. Her face disfigured, her voice gone, the narrator is invi Chuck Palahniuk is the hugely popular author of modern, edgy books like Fight Club (also a movie with Brad Pitt--go ahead, act surprised) and Choke. For this reason I did not expect to like Invisible Monsters, originally published in 1999. The story is told by a nameless narrator: a young woman who used to be beautiful. After a series of bizarre, haunting events involving a freeway, birds and a few other things those days are gone forever. Her face disfigured, her voice gone, the narrator is invisible. And a monster in the eyes of most. Desperate for someone to save her, the narrator meets Brandy Alexander at just the right time. Brandy embodies the life that the narrator used to have--except for an important operation that Brandy still needs to have. Riding off with Brandy, the narrator starts fresh. Life is a story. If you don't like the story you have, make up a new one. As the lives Brandy offers up as truth continue to change and the lies threaten to fall apart, it becomes clear that no matter where you run eventually you have to face the facts and really decide what story you want to tell. That's the story. But it's really not even half the story. Stylistically, this novel has a lot going on. It's written in the first person, present tense setting up a tone that is both conspiratorial and conversational. Despite that, the narrator remains aloof, unreliable. Talking to the reader like an old friend, the narrator reveals the smallest details of her past while leaving key plot points to herself until the right moment. There are few male novelists who can write as convincingly in the voice of a woman as Palahniuk. The narration is amazingly authentic even when the story becomes more and more over-the-top. Palahniuk also brings a high level of complexity to the narrative, writing the story in a non-linear format. The novel opens with the final scene as the narrator tries to explain how she got to that point. Along the way flashbacks are interwoven with "the present" and other points in the time line of character's lives. This is the kind of book that requires a lot of attention. Like the modeling world that the narrator comes from, nothing in this novel is exactly what it seems. Characters lie, information given as fact turns out to be false. Palahniuk manages all of these elements impressively well, making it all work despite the bizarreness and absurdity inherent to certain parts of the plot. More than anything, though, this book is really a character study. Palahniuk creates a lot of unique characters whose lives intertwine unexpectedly. As might be expected from the plot description given above, many ofthe relationships between characters in Invisible Monsters are dysfunctional. But it is the dysfunction that allows Palahniuk to look at how people interact and what it really means to love someone. So, while it is utterly strange, this novel definitely puts the "fun" in dysfunctional. You can find this review and more on my blog Miss Print

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    Pages: 200+ So, it's safe to say that Chuck Palahniuk owns my soul. Not even a little bit of it. The whole thing. Invisible Monsters blew my mind. I spent a good chunk of the book stuck in confusion and my mind felt like it had just been exposed to the trippiest thing ever. But, as I like to think, what is a Chuck Palahniuk story without mental mind trips and without confusion? It is not a Chuck Palahniuk story at all! Right off the bat Palahniuk leaves his print by introducing a set of character Pages: 200+ So, it's safe to say that Chuck Palahniuk owns my soul. Not even a little bit of it. The whole thing. Invisible Monsters blew my mind. I spent a good chunk of the book stuck in confusion and my mind felt like it had just been exposed to the trippiest thing ever. But, as I like to think, what is a Chuck Palahniuk story without mental mind trips and without confusion? It is not a Chuck Palahniuk story at all! Right off the bat Palahniuk leaves his print by introducing a set of characters in the strangest, craziest way possible. In technicality, there is a beginning and an end, but to a reader there's no formal structure at all. Which works great for the story. The reader is pulled from the "beginning" to before the beginning to the middle to a house in who-knows-where to the pre-beginning again to the middle to the beginning to the end. If you don't plan on reading this book all in one sitting, don't start reading it. Chances are you'll just end up confusing yourself more, and who wants that? Repetition, my favorite Palahniuk weapon, is used intensely in the story. Me being a big fan of repetition, especially Chuck-style, thought this was a great story enhancer. Bottom line is, I expect no one to finish reading this review because I expect everyone to be outside buying this book already.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Megs ♥

    The main character in this book is nameless, and disfigured. She was once a beautiful model, and now feels invisible. She hides under a veil after being called a monster. When she lost her face she saw the true colors of everyone in her life. Her fiance leaves, and her best friend constantly steals her clothes while she's in the hospital. In speech therapy our main character meets Brandy Alexander, and the story unfolds. This is probably my least favorite book so far by Palahniuk, but it was stil The main character in this book is nameless, and disfigured. She was once a beautiful model, and now feels invisible. She hides under a veil after being called a monster. When she lost her face she saw the true colors of everyone in her life. Her fiance leaves, and her best friend constantly steals her clothes while she's in the hospital. In speech therapy our main character meets Brandy Alexander, and the story unfolds. This is probably my least favorite book so far by Palahniuk, but it was still enjoyable. I wish I hadn't read the synopsis of this book, and just went into it knowing nothing at all. Another problem is my expectations. When I heard this was Palahniuk's first book he ever tried to have published, and it got rejected as "too disturbing" I thought this was just what I was looking for at the moment. Well, I came to the conclusion that either other people get disturbed and/or offended too easily, or I am truly becoming incapable of being shocked. So either way this is not the book's fault... Some of the "twists" in this book I saw coming within the first few pages. I will admit that there were a few that got me, but most were predictable. Again, had I not read the synopsis maybe I would have had a completely different opinion, but I have no way or knowing that for sure. So that's what I didn't like, but here is what I did like. Invisible Monsters is a book that's not about the plot. It's really about the characters. None of them are likeable, but that makes them fun to read about. Like me, you will probably wind up not caring about any of them, but they will make you laugh with their outrageous plans and crazy antics. I really could not stand the main character's parents, though. Oh jeez, these parents were like...cliches of idiotic parents that embarrass their children...times 10 thousand. Just wow. Very interesting character study, anyway. I enjoyed how the story was told with lots of scene jumping, magazine style, using the word FLASH like flash photography. I also thought Chuck did a decent job writing a woman's perspective, and he honestly captured the way some extremely superficial women think. There are definitely some inspired parts, and it's very fast paced. The story never got boring for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Darga

    "it's an old woman who owns this house, i figure. ignored and aging and drugged out old women, older and more invisible to the world every minute, they must not wear a lot of make-up. not go out to fun hot spots. not boogie to a party froth. my breath smells hot and sour inside my veils, inside the damp layers of silk and mesh and cotton georgette i lift for the first time all day; and in the mirrors, i look at the pink reflection of what's left of my face. mirror mirror on the wall, who's the "it's an old woman who owns this house, i figure. ignored and aging and drugged out old women, older and more invisible to the world every minute, they must not wear a lot of make-up. not go out to fun hot spots. not boogie to a party froth. my breath smells hot and sour inside my veils, inside the damp layers of silk and mesh and cotton georgette i lift for the first time all day; and in the mirrors, i look at the pink reflection of what's left of my face. mirror mirror on the wall, who's the fairest one of all? the evil queen was stupid to play snow white's game. there's an age where a woman has to move on to another kind of power. money, for example. or a gun." "'anything you can do is boring and old and perfectly okay. you're safe because you're so trapped inside your culture. anything you can conceive of is fine because you can conceive of it. you can't imagine any way to escape. there's no way you can get out,' brandy says. brandy says, 'and if you can find any way out of our culture, then that's a trap too. just wanting to get out of the trap reinforces the trap.' brandy says, 'the best way is not to fight it, just go. don't be trying all the time to fix things. what you run from only stays with you longer. when you fight something, you only make it stronger. she says, 'don't do what you want.' she says, "do what you dont' want. do what you're trained not to want.' it's the opposite of following your bliss. brandy tells me, 'do the things that scare you the most'" this is not my favorite or the most entertaining palahniuk book to read, but it is the one that i think has the best story. the character has the most meaningful journey. she actually resolves things. she comes to a conclusion. yes all palahniuk books are largely the same. his characters rage against the machine in more or less clever and shocking ways, and they demonize the normal and expected thing to do. what most people don't realize though is that palahniuk's books are all actually about the difference between what we think will make us happy and what will actually make us happy. in his books he explores that concept through compulsion, disaster, impossible desires, and self-imposed suffering. since that cognitive gap between intended happiness and actual happiness is something that's hugely important to how i think about my life, i am one of those people who like palahniuk more than i "should." this book explores the concept of happiness versus expected happiness more overtly than any of his other books. the characters in this book are incredibly selfcentered(something that i also really like about haunted). while the main character in fight club wants to destroy the infrastructure of society, the main character in invisible monsters wants to break free of her own expectations of herself. becoming disfigured and losing her modeling career provides a backdrop for the main character to examine her concept of identity. the other characters she goes on the road with allow her and the reader to examine gender identity and sexual identity. all the characters in the book have vague and shifting moral identities, which interact with their other identities in interesting ways. this gives the reader a chance to notice what expectations they have of each character and how those were wrong or correct, at the same time examining the accuracy of the characters' own expectations of themselves. the first half of this book always bores me a bit, but i think the payoff is worth the setup. for me, there's more catharsis in this book than any of his others.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette Nikolova

    This is possibly my last book for 2013. It's worth it. I have many problems with Palahniuk's writing. Forget about it being vulgar, it's sometimes too repetitive. I've written in other reviews about his passion for themes: Joe's ...stuff, the periodic table, the "Give me this and give me that" in this book("Give me love. Give me passion. Give me utter disappointment..."), and what I think about it, so I'm not going to go into that again. But I want to point something out. I might have rated this This is possibly my last book for 2013. It's worth it. I have many problems with Palahniuk's writing. Forget about it being vulgar, it's sometimes too repetitive. I've written in other reviews about his passion for themes: Joe's ...stuff, the periodic table, the "Give me this and give me that" in this book("Give me love. Give me passion. Give me utter disappointment..."), and what I think about it, so I'm not going to go into that again. But I want to point something out. I might have rated this with only 4 stars, but I think this book is great. It's completely and utterly mad. Madder than a hatter for sure. I have read quite a few Palahniuk books and this is by far the best and most memorable one for me. The characters are very vivid and lively and psychotic. If I tried to explain Invisible Monsters to someone, they would probably go crazy from the confusion. Everything is so intertwined and unbelievable that it keeps you on edge and waiting for the next bomb to explode. I had some speculations for what was what and who was who, but the way things resolved was just beyond my wildest expectations. I'm a little sad I didn't read Invisible Monsters Remix, but I have spoiled myself with the alternative ending anyway. *** SHOCKER *** I'm actually hoping they make this into a movie. Considering how brilliant Fight Club was, despite the book being shit, I think this could be a true masterpiece. Therefore, I have two casting suggestions. OK? Queen Brandy Alexander Manus Kelley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    “All God does is watch us and kill us when we get boring. We must never, ever be boring.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters I admire what Palahniuk was trying to do here structurally. Dislocating the reader by organizing the chapters so they don't give you an exact idea, a hint, when the book will end is novel (it did kinda remind me, in some ways of those cheap "choose your own adventure" books I used to buy from Scholastic books when I was a kid). Having the words in some chapters written “All God does is watch us and kill us when we get boring. We must never, ever be boring.” ― Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters I admire what Palahniuk was trying to do here structurally. Dislocating the reader by organizing the chapters so they don't give you an exact idea, a hint, when the book will end is novel (it did kinda remind me, in some ways of those cheap "choose your own adventure" books I used to buy from Scholastic books when I was a kid). Having the words in some chapters written backwards made my wife's vanity mirror finally useful to ME. And, I mostly adore Palahniuk's transgressive, PoMo, fiction shtick with his satirical insight into both the beautiful and the damned. There was no ONE big problem with this book and there were certainly moments of genius and moments when I laughed out lout. BUT... But when viewed as a whole, with all of the satirical dancing, noise, and absurdity -- it just didn't work or me in the end. As the novel wrapped up, I was bored more than anything. It was like being lost in a carnival funhouse. For a few minutes it might be novel and may even BE fun, but the danger and threat of a sticky, almost wearisome boredom is real. I closed the book and just felt meh. So, that.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joey

    I didn't see that coming and I didn't see that coming and I didn't see that coming either and I certainly didn't see that coming and no way I ever saw that coming. That's how the whole book is. Every other page was blowing me away. Crazy book, really good. Recommended only for the slightly insane.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria (Big City Bookworm)

    3.5 stars rated down. This one was pretty strange, not gonna lie. Someone I used to know always raved about this book as not only being their favourite Chuck Palahniuk book of all time, but their favourite book in general of all time. I didn't really research much before I finally decided to pick it up and I'm kind of glad that I didn't. This books was weird. It was written in a weird way and I liked that...I think? Part of me enjoyed this book and then another part of me is just really confused a 3.5 stars rated down. This one was pretty strange, not gonna lie. Someone I used to know always raved about this book as not only being their favourite Chuck Palahniuk book of all time, but their favourite book in general of all time. I didn't really research much before I finally decided to pick it up and I'm kind of glad that I didn't. This books was weird. It was written in a weird way and I liked that...I think? Part of me enjoyed this book and then another part of me is just really confused at what I just read. The characters weren't necessarily likeable by any means, yet I still wanted to learn more about them. The storyline itself was so strange and over-the-top, but at the same time...it was really unique. Would I call this novel one of my favourites of all time? Nah, but it was still pretty entertaining in its own strange way...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    There's a favorite device used by Pomo f#ckboys--DFW, Nick Holdstock, Chuck here--wherein they take a woman, give her no discernible personality traits other than a tragic shallowness, and then f#ck up her face. To these men, the inner and outer lives of these women--all women--are driven solely by their level of physical attractiveness. They can't for the life of them imagine say, a woman obsessed with particle physics, or philosophy, or even where to get the best coffee beans(The hipster male There's a favorite device used by Pomo f#ckboys--DFW, Nick Holdstock, Chuck here--wherein they take a woman, give her no discernible personality traits other than a tragic shallowness, and then f#ck up her face. To these men, the inner and outer lives of these women--all women--are driven solely by their level of physical attractiveness. They can't for the life of them imagine say, a woman obsessed with particle physics, or philosophy, or even where to get the best coffee beans(The hipster male circa 1999 already had a monopoly on that one, I guess). Instead, these ladies fret over invisibility because they haven't developed a life of the mind, which then allows said f#ckboys to either pity (Wallace) or castigate them, while remaining wholly oblivious to the fact that their own pea-sized imaginations have failed to fill in their characters. Maybe the boobs make up for it? And speaking of 1999, the consumerland drivel, where's-my-jet-pack jokes, and tasteless--albeit about as shocking as the "She's man, baby! A man!" shtick in Beyond the Valley of the Dolls(See? I can do this, too, although I already regret it)--portrayal of sexuality and gender was about as tired as a Friends rerun by then. This is the kind of Gen X nonsense that makes me thrill at the prospect of being eaten alive by a millennial.

  28. 4 out of 5

    ⭐ Roxie |The Book Slayer| Voorhees ⭐

    A great introduction to Chuck's written style (yes of course I have seen Fight Club, but I haven't read anything by him until now). I love his sarcasm and wit. His characters are not characters we normally see but character we all know. I have a few more of his works on my TBR and look forward to it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Reading Invisible Monsters is what I imagine a moderately unpleasant acid trip feels like.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rade

    WARNING: I might be an asshole in this review...and there will be few spoilers here and there, as well as a lot of profanity First of all, I don't give a slightest shit about any of the characters in this book, especially Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, AKA Princess Princess. She is a pill popping, surgery obsessed, not giving a crap about anybody else kind of a bitch. She goes around judging people, showing them catalogs that have different plastic surgeries that she can get, even vaginoplasty WARNING: I might be an asshole in this review...and there will be few spoilers here and there, as well as a lot of profanity First of all, I don't give a slightest shit about any of the characters in this book, especially Brandy Alexander, Queen Supreme, AKA Princess Princess. She is a pill popping, surgery obsessed, not giving a crap about anybody else kind of a bitch. She goes around judging people, showing them catalogs that have different plastic surgeries that she can get, even vaginoplasty. She is obsessed with looking good and she pops pills like crazy. The main character has an accident that leaves her unable to talk. She tries to deal with this problem as best as possible but it is easier said than done. She meets Brandy and they go on a spree of stealing shit and finding as many places to take prescription pills as possible. Brandy tries to help the narrator and tells her unless she stops thinking about the past and the present, she will never be happy in the future, or some shit like that. We also learn about how the narrator's brother was gay and how he died of AIDS. Her parents talk about their son like he was an apple of their eye, forgetting that they bashed his way of life when they found out about it. Now that he is dead, the narrator is supposed to get all the attention, but she doesn't since her parents are obsessed over their dead son. They join a group of parents with homosexual children, and want to be good parents. They also give the narrator condoms (like five boxes of them) to the narrator (their daughter) while at the same time telling her about all the horrible sexually transmitted diseases she can get. Great parents, right? The ending I saw coming a mile away. Few twists here and there, but overall disappointing. I did not see the point of this book. You might think this is why I did not enjoy the book, but you are wrong. It is hard for me to read a book if every character is so unlikeable even I want to shoot them in their face. Anyway, a lot of talk about plastic surgery in this book, a lot of sexual themes (include mentions of oral sex, anal sex, porno magazines, sexual positions and/or sexual favors, plastic surgeries on sexual organs, and much more crap like that). The characters seem to like each other/tolerate each other in the beginning but it falls apart in the end. Luckily this was a quick read and the book cost e 75 cents. Otherwise I would not have picked up this steamy peace of crap even if you paid me. If i got anything wrong in this review, I just don't care. This was pretty disappointing book anyway. P.S. Sorry if my language offended you. I usually write shorter and cleaner reviews. I just hated this damn book that it made me temporarily crazy. I picked up another book so I am OK now. This one can be found in my trash bin.

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