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The Singer of All Songs

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Author: Kate Constable

Published: March 1st 2005 by Scholastic Paperbacks (first published September 1st 2002)

Format: Paperback , 320 pages

Isbn: 9780439554794

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Calwyn has never been beyond the high ice-wall that guards the sisters of Antaris from the world of Tremaris. She knows only the rounds of her life as a novice ice priestess, tending her bees, singing her ice chantments, and dreaming. But then Calwyn befriends Darrow, a mysterious Outlander who appears inside the Wall and warns of an approaching danger. To help Darrow, to s Calwyn has never been beyond the high ice-wall that guards the sisters of Antaris from the world of Tremaris. She knows only the rounds of her life as a novice ice priestess, tending her bees, singing her ice chantments, and dreaming. But then Calwyn befriends Darrow, a mysterious Outlander who appears inside the Wall and warns of an approaching danger. To help Darrow, to see the world, and perhaps to save it, Calwyn will leave the safety of the Wall for a journey with a man she barely knows--and an adventure as beautiful and dangerous as the music of chantment itself.

30 review for The Singer of All Songs

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Singer of All Songs

    this book was spellbinding for me. not only was the content gripping, enchanting and original- with singers as weavers of magic. but also, it was the writing style of the author that, coupled together with the plot, made reading the book magic itself! from the start with the seemingly impenetrable ice walls of Antaris which was fine description, and the vivid portrayal of feelings of main character, to the new friends met along the way, and the noble quest set out for, it was simply beautifully w this book was spellbinding for me. not only was the content gripping, enchanting and original- with singers as weavers of magic. but also, it was the writing style of the author that, coupled together with the plot, made reading the book magic itself! from the start with the seemingly impenetrable ice walls of Antaris which was fine description, and the vivid portrayal of feelings of main character, to the new friends met along the way, and the noble quest set out for, it was simply beautifully written and very engaging. the feeling of waiting for the next book in this trilogy to come out was terrible, by far the worst wait of my life...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This is the first book in a young adult fantasy triology by Kate Constable. I read the first two last year before I realized the third book hadn't been written. (Why I usually wait for ALL the books in a series--there are starting to be more exceptions to my usual rule these days.)The third book is now available. It's a story of chanters. Calwyn is an ice chanter and the main character. There are nine power of chantment--the power of tongue, beasts, seeming, winds, iron, becoming, fire, ice, and This is the first book in a young adult fantasy triology by Kate Constable. I read the first two last year before I realized the third book hadn't been written. (Why I usually wait for ALL the books in a series--there are starting to be more exceptions to my usual rule these days.)The third book is now available. It's a story of chanters. Calwyn is an ice chanter and the main character. There are nine power of chantment--the power of tongue, beasts, seeming, winds, iron, becoming, fire, ice, and the Great Power. I read so much nonfiction that it's nice to drop into some other invented world once in a while. I also like stories that show strong female characters.

  3. 4 out of 5

    The Book Queen

    Second Review - read in December 2015 Almost two years separate the two times I've read this book. Over such a long period of time, people's tastes change - mine certainly have - and so I was a little bit apprehensive about starting this one again. I remembered quite a bit of the storyline, and I remembered how much I loved the author's writing style, but I wasn't entirely sure if it was as good as I had remembered it to be. I was a little afraid I was looking at it with rose-tinted glasses. For t Second Review - read in December 2015 Almost two years separate the two times I've read this book. Over such a long period of time, people's tastes change - mine certainly have - and so I was a little bit apprehensive about starting this one again. I remembered quite a bit of the storyline, and I remembered how much I loved the author's writing style, but I wasn't entirely sure if it was as good as I had remembered it to be. I was a little afraid I was looking at it with rose-tinted glasses. For the first, at least 40, possibly 50%, this was true. I found the characters incredibly annoying and while the writing was beautiful, the world was a bit unoriginal and cliché. Calwyn, the main character, was a whiny, immature little brat. I honestly despised her - she constantly blamed others for everything and kept getting them into trouble, all the while denying that she ever did anything wrong! She was absolutely infuriating. The other characters weren't much better: Darrow was too cold and distant for me to ever get fond of him, and none of the other characters are well-developed enough for me to judge them. Samis, I thought, was a very one-dimensional, tropey character - the ubiquitous evil, dark sorcerer who appears in every second-rate fantasy book. I read a ton of fantasy and I'm not content with one-dimensional villains anymore. They need to (a) be interesting, (b) develop just like the protagonists, and (c) genuinely make me scared - because that's the point of a villain, right? Sadly, Samis wasn't any of those things. I also thought that the world needed something. It was fairly interesting, and I liked the idea of the nine chantments and the walled city of Antaris, but at times it seemed too cliché and unoriginal. I know said in my original mini-review that I thought the setting was really interesting, but I'd changed my mind the second time around. Added to that, the storyline was quite dull - it suffers from that ever-present syndrome in fantasy, The Endless Walking. The characters were just walking from one country to another, not really doing anything, and there's nothing more fascinating than watching two characters wander up and down, up and down, with nothing to do but bicker. *sarcasm* All in all, I wasn't particularly enthused. Around this point I considered putting it down and reading something else, but I decided against it - and I'm very glad I did. The second half of the book picks up considerably. I'm not entirely sure why, because the pace doesn't really change, and there's still a fair amount of travelling, but the whole book just felt slicker, better, more intriguing. I loved the character of Mica and the writing was just stunning. Hands down, Kate Constable's writing is the best part of the book. Would I recommend it? Yes, I would. Does it have its flaws? Yes, definitely. If the writing is the book's main strength, the characters are its weakness - they were all pretty annoying and one-sided, and I was disappointed to see how little Calwyn changed by the end of the book. I also found her romance-infatuation-thing with Darrow disappointing - first of all, they barely knew each other, and he wasn't exactly very pleasant to her - most of the time he's downright unkind and careless. But aside from that, I didn't really like the age difference - she was what, barely sixteen (?) and he was nearly thirty. It might just be me, but that didn't sit well. Despite all that, I still enjoyed it, and I'm keeping my original rating and placing on my favourites shelf. I'm less keen on reading the sequels, because to be honest, it doesn't seem to me like it needs to be a trilogy. I say this a lot, but really three books sounds unnecessary - tack on another fifty pages to this one just to wind things up, and it would be fine, because (view spoiler)[the villain was dead. There wasn't really anything left to do (hide spoiler)] . It's a pretty short book anyway, so an extra fifty pages would have been manageable. But again, that's just me. 4 out of 5 stars *** Original Review - read in January/February 2014 I actually loved this one. I really liked the original and beautiful fantasy setting, the chanters, and Constable's writing style is lovely. The characters could do with a bit more development: Calwyn was quite whiny and childish and I hated Darrow's 'mysterious' attitude, but it's still one of my favourites and I really want the sequels.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jamio

    If you get the strange feeling that you've already read Kate Constable's first installment of the Tremaris trilogy, it's probably because you've read Garth Nix's Lirael. There is very little original or imaginative in Calwyn's episodic journey to destroy yet another one-dimensional Basic Evil Guy: this novel is not novel. Calwyn, a cloistered novice who has spent her first seventeen years behind a magically maintained ice-wall, plays the gawking spectator on what is basically a tour of Constable If you get the strange feeling that you've already read Kate Constable's first installment of the Tremaris trilogy, it's probably because you've read Garth Nix's Lirael. There is very little original or imaginative in Calwyn's episodic journey to destroy yet another one-dimensional Basic Evil Guy: this novel is not novel. Calwyn, a cloistered novice who has spent her first seventeen years behind a magically maintained ice-wall, plays the gawking spectator on what is basically a tour of Constable's made-up world. But because not enough time was spent establishing Calwyn's world-view, and because most of us have read any number of books set in magical fantasy worlds, we are not surprised when Calwyn is surprised, not filled with wonder along with her. We're left out. For example, very early-on in the book Calwyn finds a Sorceror on the wrong side of the wall. This causes much consternation inside the book, but not out here in the real world because we were not given to understand that it was not widely known inside the wall that men, or even anyone outside the wall, could work magic. That kind of sloppiness permeates the entire book. If it's available, and you're one of those people who just needs to be reading, don't hesitate to pick it up. It's not as bad as a withdrawal headache. Just don't bother seeking it out. There are other books much more worth the effort.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I loved the poetic way that Constable wrote this book. It's beautful!!! And it's mysterious and exciting and interesting and fresh and amazing...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thebookbutterfly

    I really wanted to love this one, I did. I think that some things were just awkwardly placed and then, later on, even more awkwardly explained. The writing style was pretty but had its ups and downs~ I did skip over some paragraphs were the details got particularly elaborate. The dialogue was stilted a bit like when something bad was happening once of them would go faint and yell "No!" A few eye-rolling moments, but nothing too bad. Calwyn was pretty good and Trout was really funny~ Darrow was sul I really wanted to love this one, I did. I think that some things were just awkwardly placed and then, later on, even more awkwardly explained. The writing style was pretty but had its ups and downs~ I did skip over some paragraphs were the details got particularly elaborate. The dialogue was stilted a bit like when something bad was happening once of them would go faint and yell "No!" A few eye-rolling moments, but nothing too bad. Calwyn was pretty good and Trout was really funny~ Darrow was sulker, mates. The romance had so much potential but I think more of that is being saved for later books. Calwyn and Darrow had a couple "awww..." moments but spend most of the time dodging each other. The worlds that they traveled around to were really interesting. I was quite distracted while reading this book and this review isn't giving you much insight into the characters, plot, etc. It was just kinda "meh" for me, maybe I should try some of Kate Constable's contemporary books? Anyway, sorry for the musings that I have substituted for a review. I just wanted to say something about this book...I think you should try reading it if you just have an uneventful afternoon to spare or something... But anyway. It wasn't bad. 2.5 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there mateys! I don’t remember who convinced me to give this series a chance but I do know that it was the discussion of music that led to it. I was warned that the series was read when much younger and so she didn’t know if it would hold up. I listened to this one on audiobook with narration by Karen Ziemba. They actually excluded samples of the chanting which was cool. They unfortunately used the exact same versions of the chanting for the entire book. Not so cool. I ended up thinking tha Ahoy there mateys! I don’t remember who convinced me to give this series a chance but I do know that it was the discussion of music that led to it. I was warned that the series was read when much younger and so she didn’t know if it would hold up. I listened to this one on audiobook with narration by Karen Ziemba. They actually excluded samples of the chanting which was cool. They unfortunately used the exact same versions of the chanting for the entire book. Not so cool. I ended up thinking that this was just an okay read. I did like the magic system and the main protagonist. But the plot was not good for me at all. Serious problems with it. At least enough time has passed that I threw whole sections out of me noggin. So won’t be readin’ any others in this series. I am glad I read it and satisfied the curiosity I always had for the series. I do think that if I was in middle school, I would have liked this series a lot more. Check out me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nina {ᴡᴏʀᴅs ᴀɴᴅ ᴡᴀᴛᴇʀ}

    Revisiting this old favourite was on whim, but a very good whim. I most certainly don't regret it. I also really enjoyed rereading this somewhat hidden gem. It's classic in its style of story - quest, mysterious stranger, naive girl, bad guy, and new friends along the way. But it's a nice classic in the sense that Calwyn is a fresh breath of air, Darrow is not and asshole but he's also got the hard edges of an worldly person, and the side characters are supportive in their own unique way. Consta Revisiting this old favourite was on whim, but a very good whim. I most certainly don't regret it. I also really enjoyed rereading this somewhat hidden gem. It's classic in its style of story - quest, mysterious stranger, naive girl, bad guy, and new friends along the way. But it's a nice classic in the sense that Calwyn is a fresh breath of air, Darrow is not and asshole but he's also got the hard edges of an worldly person, and the side characters are supportive in their own unique way. Constable's The Singer of All Songs fits seamlessly into an era of stories where there was a definite bad guy and your heroine is definitely not an anti-hero. She's a hero all round. Naive, but heroic. A more comprehensive review coming soon!

  9. 4 out of 5

    mo

    What if you could sing magic into being? High, pure notes for ice or coldness; gravelly low tones for metal; whistling alto songs for wind; and the silent music of dance for healing. The Singer of All Songs takes the idea of song-based magic and weaves it into a mythic-toned young adult fantasy novel reminiscent of Alison Croggon's The Books of Pellinor. I don't quite remember how I came across The Singer of All Songs, but I'm glad I borrowed a copy despite my ultimately mixed feelings on it. I'v What if you could sing magic into being? High, pure notes for ice or coldness; gravelly low tones for metal; whistling alto songs for wind; and the silent music of dance for healing. The Singer of All Songs takes the idea of song-based magic and weaves it into a mythic-toned young adult fantasy novel reminiscent of Alison Croggon's The Books of Pellinor. I don't quite remember how I came across The Singer of All Songs, but I'm glad I borrowed a copy despite my ultimately mixed feelings on it. I've been struggling with fatigue lately (work during the summer is exhausting in a children's library, y'all, no matter how fulfilling it is), so its short length and nostalgic (to me) tone let me plow through it. Plus, this title had a few things going for it that helped me enjoy it:➼ A musical magic system. I may have mentioned in other reviews that I don't really mind if a magic system is codified in an almost scientific way (ala Brandon Sanderson), but I've always found magic systems that are somehow tied to music or language really appealing. The world of Tremaris and its various types of music-based magic disciplines was beautiful; the descriptions of how they all interact with each other and what they sound like when sung were done well. ➼ An interesting, flawed protagonist and a varied supporting cast. I don't think all readers with like Calwyn, the protagonist, at least not at first blush. She starts off relatively secure but a bit mischievous, and her restless nature almost borders on whiny. To me, that's fine - she's 16, and based on her upbringing, it makes sense that her outlook on the world is sheltered. There's also such a thing as character development, and Calwyn certainly does learn and grow over the course of the novel. I wasn't as fond of Darrow; Calwyn mentions not getting a good read on him, so to speak, and I agree with her assessment. He holds himself apart from the group, and this book never really resolves why (other than just saying he's aloof, which just seemed to kind of hand-wave it away). Luckily, the other side characters are more fleshed-out and likeable, though I do hope they develop more past being fantasy archetypes in future books. I think Mica, the brash windworker, is my favorite at the moment. ➼ The descriptive prose. This is another thing that will really vary from reader to reader - I think others might find the prose too far on the purple side - but I liked it. It painted the people and landscapes of Tremaris in vivid colors to me.Now I want to talk about some things that I wasn't as fond of. I mentioned above that sometimes, the cast felt like fantasy archetype characters. Trout, for instance, felt mostly one-note as the bookish, reluctant tagalong. Darrow was the terse and mysterious mentor figure. Mica and Tonno, luckily, developed past their first impressions, especially through the found family they seem to be building with each other. Like, this wasn't terrible or anything, but I do look for well-fleshed-out characters when reading fiction, and this book fell just a bit short for me in that regard. The hints at a romance between Darrow and Calwyn were another thing that I was on the fence about. For one thing, Darrow's personality felt as lively as a blank stone wall (view spoiler)[once he and Calwyn escaped from Antaris (hide spoiler)] . I'm glad he showed some liveliness in the beginning of the book, because I would've really had to push myself to care about him otherwise. There's also the fact that Darrow is the first man that Calwyn ever met. Maybe I'm just growing grouchier and grouchier about stuff like this as I read more, but I don't really love it when a girl or woman is written to fall in love with the first man she has ever laid eyes on. Don't get me wrong, this wasn't written as instalove; the romance was also pretty subtle, at least by YA standards. But I was still simultaneously predicting the romance, hoping I was wrong, and rolling my eyes when the hints started cropping up more persistently. Oh, and the villain was pretty...stock-fantasy-villain-y. I didn't find him compelling at all, so I hope any villains in the next two books have more interesting motivations. I don't want to end on a negative note, so here's another thing I did enjoy: Halasaa! I really hope there's more of him in the next books. He was one of my favorite characters, and he was only introduced near the end. If you don't hate journey fantasy books (I know a lot of people do), and you think the premise sounds appealing, I'd say to give this one a shot. I mean, Garth Nix blurbed it, and apparently Tamora Peirce rated it 5 stars on here, so maybe I'm an odd duck and you, the potential reader, would enjoy it even more than I did.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelly RAley

    I was looking at the ratings and it seems that the younger the reviewer, the more stars they gave it. Perhaps it is because I have read A LOT of fantasy, but this was just ok for me. I liked the world the author created. It was innovative, but not really fresh. I felt like the places where we wanted a deeper understanding of the world, Constable skipped over what could have been interesting. The societies she created were very two dimensional, as were her characters and their struggles, but for I was looking at the ratings and it seems that the younger the reviewer, the more stars they gave it. Perhaps it is because I have read A LOT of fantasy, but this was just ok for me. I liked the world the author created. It was innovative, but not really fresh. I felt like the places where we wanted a deeper understanding of the world, Constable skipped over what could have been interesting. The societies she created were very two dimensional, as were her characters and their struggles, but for a debut novel, it was ok. I will probably read the other books in the series, but only if I have nothing else in my TBR pile. this would be fine for kids 10+ to read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pie

    3.5 stars. I have … slightly complicated feelings about this book. I read it when I was younger, then bought a copy at a used book sale on a whim and reread it. I still enjoyed it, but now that I'm older, I noticed a couple things that I didn't like about it. Some spoilers. GOOD STUFF: •I really like the world-building! The idea of magic through song is a really interesting and unique one. The scenes where Calwyn and other characters are using chantment are well-described: it really does feel like 3.5 stars. I have … slightly complicated feelings about this book. I read it when I was younger, then bought a copy at a used book sale on a whim and reread it. I still enjoyed it, but now that I'm older, I noticed a couple things that I didn't like about it. Some spoilers. GOOD STUFF: •I really like the world-building! The idea of magic through song is a really interesting and unique one. The scenes where Calwyn and other characters are using chantment are well-described: it really does feel like a combination of magic and musical talent. •It's also nice that each type of chantment is clearly described (fire, ice, illusions, etc.) and have distinct limitations, since I've read a lot of fantasy novels where the magic systems were very loosely defined and just did whatever the plot demanded it. •My greatest weakness is ragtags bands of misfits, and the crew of the Fledgewing fits right into that category. Mica and Trout were my favorite side characters. •Although we don't see much of Samis, he's a pretty good villain. His motivation to unite Tremaris is understandable, but also selfish since he wants to make himself emperor. He can also be genuinely creepy in the scenes where he uses the Power of Seeming. I also always find villains more interesting when they have a personal connection to the characters, and his former friendship with Darrow definitely qualifies as that. •Minimal romance. Some books I like romance, some I don't. I don't really think it was necessary in this book–it's more about Calwyn making friends and seeing the wider world–so I'm glad there wasn't much. •The ending is satisfying and wraps up a lot of stuff and just some questions and conflicts to be explored in future novels. I dunno, it sometimes bothers me when books end with a blatant sequel hook. SOME LESS GREAT STUFF •Potential romance weirdness. Calwyn is sixteen; Darrow's exact age isn't given except that he's closer to thirty than twenty, meaning he's at least nine or ten years older than she is. I'm reserving judgement because the actual romance doesn't happen in this book. Still. Teenage girl + grown man = not my thing. •Disability stuff. I'm not disabled and therefore can't speak for the disabled community, but there were two things that bothered me: 1. The first is that Halasaa's people are all mute, and even use a different kind of chantment that works through dance instead of words. However, they can easily communicate telepathically to anyone they want to, meaning all conversations with them are exactly like regular speaking but in italics. Again, I'm not disabled, but this still felt slightly off to me. 2. Darrow goes throughout the novel with a badly broken foot that didn't heal entirely right, causing him pain and leading him to sometimes walk with a cane. He dislikes that it sometimes impedes his ability to travel, but seems to mostly accept it after a while. However, Halasaa demonstrates his ability to heal through chantment by completely healing Darrow's foot so it's like it was never injured. I don't claim to be an expert on disability representation in fantasy, but for those unfamiliar with why magically healing disabilities isn't good, you can look up articles like the one posted on Disability in Kidlit, called (Not) Engaging with Disability: Convenient Approaches in SFF. End verdict on the novel: enjoyable, and I would like to reread the sequels, but has some stuff I found problematic. Also, please feel free to tell me if you think anything in this review is incorrect or offensive. I want to be a good ally, and I understand that means growing, changing, and listening to the opinions of others who know more about certain topics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    noshin tasnim

    Ehh, It was mainly uneventful.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    There seems to be a fad in YA fantasy these past years for magic to involve music and the rescued heroines to be the ones to save the world (unexpectedly, of course). Summarizing it like that makes me think "well, that's not really so new," because it's always the rescued hero(ine) who ends up saving the world, now isn't it? But I swear there's a new popular style thing going on, and The Singer of All Songs lands firmly in it. It reminds me very strongly of the Pellinor series by Alison Croggon, There seems to be a fad in YA fantasy these past years for magic to involve music and the rescued heroines to be the ones to save the world (unexpectedly, of course). Summarizing it like that makes me think "well, that's not really so new," because it's always the rescued hero(ine) who ends up saving the world, now isn't it? But I swear there's a new popular style thing going on, and The Singer of All Songs lands firmly in it. It reminds me very strongly of the Pellinor series by Alison Croggon, where Maerad is taken from a distant, secluded place and introduced to the wider world, where it turns out her magical ability isn't as normal as she thought, and she's likely the one meant to save the world from some horrible thing. Calwyn is also taken from a distant, secluded place and introduced to the wider world, where it turns out her magical ability isn't as normal as the thought, and she's likely the one meant to save the world from some horrible thing. In Tremaris, the world of The Singer of All Songs, the magic is split into types of chantments (note the pun!) that different societies have specialised in for centuries. Calwyn happens to come from the tradition of high-pitched ice chants, but there's also songs of iron, seeming, being, fire, and so on. Calwyn leaves her home when it is threatened by a chanter who has the power of many different kinds of songs, rather than just one - which is the way it usually is. She travels with Darrow, a chanter of iron, who has made it his quest to stop the evil chanter, and who apparently was the one who brought the evil chanter to Antaris in the first place. Of course, because this is One Of Those Stories, it's obvious that Calwyn has a crush on Darrow and they might could fall in love. The way I see it, he's the first man she's ever met who has the potential to be a romantic interest, so she fixates on him. It's totally awkward and weird, especially because (as near as I could tell), Calwyn is supposed to be about sixteen years old and Darrow is twice her age. Luckily, others join their traveling party and the reader isn't subjected to the weird UST all the time. Despite the clichés and "haven't I read this before?" feeling of the book, I did like it a lot. Kate Constable seems to have given careful thought to the politics of the different factions as well as the way her type of magic would affect the characters and environment. It's always neat when that happens. Furthermore, the writing itself is engaging and the story never lost my interest. Though this is the first book in a trilogy, it works as a stand-alone. There's no real threads left hanging at the end to require the reader to continue to the second in the series, but it's set up so that the plot could easily carry into a second book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This book is more like 4 and a half star, but there was something that bothered in the end. Here goes the riview. I had high hopes for this series. The author is Austrailian and it was a first for me. (it might be odd to be intrigued by a nationality but, come on! it is quite amazing!) It wasn't about vampire, warewolf or any kind magic I've heard of before. It's about people with gifts, chanting the words like a song to bring out the power that they were learned to do from a very young age. I ha This book is more like 4 and a half star, but there was something that bothered in the end. Here goes the riview. I had high hopes for this series. The author is Austrailian and it was a first for me. (it might be odd to be intrigued by a nationality but, come on! it is quite amazing!) It wasn't about vampire, warewolf or any kind magic I've heard of before. It's about people with gifts, chanting the words like a song to bring out the power that they were learned to do from a very young age. I have this image in my head where people will sing beautiful tunes in order to save the world. Wouldn't that be wonderful? Because I believe that a song, when sang with a soul, is more powerful than spoken words itself. When reading this book, author often writes sentences like "even now she wouldn't forget the scream from that night" (not her exact words) but those phrases made me feel like I was reading some sort of a fairy tale or a folk lore. Also, I was amazed how much excitment was stuffedd into such a small book without the stories being underdevelopped. It was very fast paced and sometimes time flew by with a blink of an eye. But it was more or less very reasonable. The heroine was, strange at times for me. Needless to say she was my least favorite character. But rest assure, there are plenty of interesting characters that you want to engage in. At the end of the book, there was a part where I got confused of who the speaker was. I felt like it got side tracked for few pages. And the ending was.. well, not surprising. But all in all, it was a great book. Filled with fellowship, love, magic and a bit of sorrow. I'm very glad to have stumbled onto this book and can't wait for the second and the third book to be delivered !!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    I picked up this first novel by Constable because of a cover blurb by Garth Nix. We'll see if I trust HIM again! ;-) Seriously, maybe Constable will improve with time, but I didn't feel that this book was up to general publishing standards. It really felt like a first effort. It started out OK, with us meeting the young, talented, but rebellious priestess in her home village... but once she absconds from said village (with an injured sorcerer on the run from his powerful nemesis) it becomes hopele I picked up this first novel by Constable because of a cover blurb by Garth Nix. We'll see if I trust HIM again! ;-) Seriously, maybe Constable will improve with time, but I didn't feel that this book was up to general publishing standards. It really felt like a first effort. It started out OK, with us meeting the young, talented, but rebellious priestess in her home village... but once she absconds from said village (with an injured sorcerer on the run from his powerful nemesis) it becomes hopeless. There's no attempt at character generation, and so much happens in so few pages that you could miss entire locations if you blinked... seriously - this page: we're at a college, next page pirates, two pages later, volcano, three pages later, dinosaurs, everything flying by without any time for the reader to FEEL - or even visualize - anything. A character might die - but we don't care, 'cause we never got to know him in the slightest, since he was only ALIVE for 5 pages! (etc.) The plot is really stereotypical (There are 9 types of magical spellsong, and the bad guy wants to collect them all so he can take over the world) - and while I do feel that a 'classic' plot can be done well, Constable needs to learn to slow down and savor her writing - so that her readers can enjoy the action!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Setting/World Building: 5/5 Main Character: 4/5 Other Characters: 4/5 Plot: 4/5 Writing: 5/5 Triggering/Issues: 5/5 (None!) AVERAGED TOTAL: 4.5 out of 5, rounded to 4. This was a delightful quick read. The sort of YA fantasy I've always loved, with an enjoyable female main character, and a fun, interesting sort of magic. In this world, magic comes in the form of "chantments" (it's singing/chanted enchantments, thus chantments). There are nine varieties of it, and it is all done through singing, fro Setting/World Building: 5/5 Main Character: 4/5 Other Characters: 4/5 Plot: 4/5 Writing: 5/5 Triggering/Issues: 5/5 (None!) AVERAGED TOTAL: 4.5 out of 5, rounded to 4. This was a delightful quick read. The sort of YA fantasy I've always loved, with an enjoyable female main character, and a fun, interesting sort of magic. In this world, magic comes in the form of "chantments" (it's singing/chanted enchantments, thus chantments). There are nine varieties of it, and it is all done through singing, from high range to low range depending on the magic. The magic and the world was touched upon just enough in this book to make me curious for more, but given that it's part of a series, I'm sure we'll get more information about it all. I liked the MC, I liked how curious she was, how loyal and brave she was. I also liked the "romance", in that it was pleasant but mostly in the background; it didn't steal the focus of the story like romances sometimes can. The villain was a bit... Evil Bad Guy™, but I sort of enjoyed that, and I get the impression that the point of him wasn't to be an overarching villain, but to be the catalyst that brought them all together. All in all, it was a good read, though I could have used a little more depth and plot. Looking forward to the next one!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

    I enjoyed reading this book. I feel that Kate Constable made a very creative and interesting world. I like the characters, the locations, and the cultures. I thought it was interesting how the different people of the Tremaris felt towards the chanters and their magic. The magic itself was interesting. Maybe I'm just not wise in the world of fantasy, but I thought it was really cool and unique that the magic was produced by singing different enchantments. Their voice had power, which is just a re I enjoyed reading this book. I feel that Kate Constable made a very creative and interesting world. I like the characters, the locations, and the cultures. I thought it was interesting how the different people of the Tremaris felt towards the chanters and their magic. The magic itself was interesting. Maybe I'm just not wise in the world of fantasy, but I thought it was really cool and unique that the magic was produced by singing different enchantments. Their voice had power, which is just a really cool thought. However, I felt that the book was a little too fast-paced for me. Maybe because I just came from reading the Song of Ice and Fire books, which are amazing detailed and thought-out, that this book seemed a little rushed. I feel that maybe the author could have spent a little more time on the details. I'm not saying the writing was bad, just that there wasn't enough of it. It felt more like I was skimming the story than actually reading it. My only other complaint was that at times, I felt that the point-of-view wasn't very clear, which wasn't a problem, just a little strange. All-in-all, I definitely liked the book and hope to get my hands on the sequels.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emma Rose Ribbons

    I loved many parts of this - the heroine, for one, and the magic as well. I also loved that it was about a group of friends, it's something that I'm increasingly looking for in my reading. Happy to say I enjoyed it enough to continue on with the series - at last! ------- Reread this in 2016 to see if I wanted to continue with the series and I don't. The friendship at the heart of this is decently built and the magic is very interesting but I thought the writing was really weak and I couldn't relat I loved many parts of this - the heroine, for one, and the magic as well. I also loved that it was about a group of friends, it's something that I'm increasingly looking for in my reading. Happy to say I enjoyed it enough to continue on with the series - at last! ------- Reread this in 2016 to see if I wanted to continue with the series and I don't. The friendship at the heart of this is decently built and the magic is very interesting but I thought the writing was really weak and I couldn't relate to any of the characters who aren't as developed as I would have liked. A shame :( ---- Original review in 2014 : Aw that was so good and heartwarming for some reason. The book is divided into two parts - the heroine's life as a priestess, which called to mind The Mists of Avalon, and her adventure tracking a man trying to control all of the elements. I liked that it ended up being a friendship story where Calwyn is very much part of a group in which everyone has a role to play. Her special gifts were also absolutely lovely to read about. What a hidden gem this book was, I can only hope the rest of the trilogy is as enchanting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alyn

    I listened to the audio version. It was different. As a book that contains music and centered around it, it makes sense why they included chants (that's what they sounded like to me) throughout the book. Most of the time it was a distraction because the narrator continued reading through the chanting. I had to tune out the background music/chanting so I could concentrate on the words. The male chanting was not at all pleasing either. It sounded like someone mumbling. Overall, my experience with I listened to the audio version. It was different. As a book that contains music and centered around it, it makes sense why they included chants (that's what they sounded like to me) throughout the book. Most of the time it was a distraction because the narrator continued reading through the chanting. I had to tune out the background music/chanting so I could concentrate on the words. The male chanting was not at all pleasing either. It sounded like someone mumbling. Overall, my experience with this audio version wasn't a very good one. The story itself was interesting. I liked Calwyn. She had some spunk. I liked all the other characters except for Darrow. I can't help but think he's got something up his sleeve. Throughout the whole book, I couldn't bring myself to trust him. Oh, and Calwyn's feelings towards him kind of grosses me out. She's 16. Darrow sounds like he could be 40. Gross much? I understand, different times, different world, different views on these things but it's still disgusting to me. I already know I won't be continuing on with the rest of the trilogy. I'm not interested in seeing more of this world. I like that the book did not end with a cliff hanger.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kiwi

    I have experienced another case of "supporting characters steal the show". I did enjoy the main character, especially later in the book. The world-building and introduction played out like many a fantasy story, it seemed, which is to say I didn't mind it at all but wasn't "zomgz shocked!!" by anything revealed. I adored the writing style: very poetic and descriptive. I fall head-over for elemental/craft magic and for songs, so the combination was lovely. I enjoyed the way the romance built with I have experienced another case of "supporting characters steal the show". I did enjoy the main character, especially later in the book. The world-building and introduction played out like many a fantasy story, it seemed, which is to say I didn't mind it at all but wasn't "zomgz shocked!!" by anything revealed. I adored the writing style: very poetic and descriptive. I fall head-over for elemental/craft magic and for songs, so the combination was lovely. I enjoyed the way the romance built with a bit of subtlety--weaving threads into the plot but not Taking Over the way it so often does and without smacking me in the face with a frying pan. I was not overly fond of the main male character (involved in the romance); I found him a bit too angsty and aloof and unpredictable for my tastes, although I did appreciate the odd cute scene here and there. But again, for me, it was all about these supporting characters that I came to love. I'm a Mica fangirl. The others, too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kari Chapman

    This was an interesting world. I like the magic working through singing thing, and how it limits magics to certain people (no one can do all the magic). The book opened well, but had a hard time holding my attention. I think that's mostly because I'm not the target audience for this book. It doesn't seem to be one of those YA books that is as entertaining to adults as it is for young adult. I feel it does have great potential for an actual young adult though, and will try to keep it in mind for w This was an interesting world. I like the magic working through singing thing, and how it limits magics to certain people (no one can do all the magic). The book opened well, but had a hard time holding my attention. I think that's mostly because I'm not the target audience for this book. It doesn't seem to be one of those YA books that is as entertaining to adults as it is for young adult. I feel it does have great potential for an actual young adult though, and will try to keep it in mind for when my kid is old enough to move into this age group.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tori Crandall

    This book captivated me as a young girl, after being enslaved by the magical world of Harry Potter (an obscenely unhealthy obsession) I found solace in The Chanters of Tremaris. As I've aged, however, I've come to find it is...to say....a little underdeveloped, but alas I still adore it. Kate Constable created a beautiful, magical world, for me to fold into when seeking that girl that I used to be. Its is a mellow read, the ginger to my sushi palette. I plan to re-enter the world of Tremaris for This book captivated me as a young girl, after being enslaved by the magical world of Harry Potter (an obscenely unhealthy obsession) I found solace in The Chanters of Tremaris. As I've aged, however, I've come to find it is...to say....a little underdeveloped, but alas I still adore it. Kate Constable created a beautiful, magical world, for me to fold into when seeking that girl that I used to be. Its is a mellow read, the ginger to my sushi palette. I plan to re-enter the world of Tremaris for years to come. Calwyn will forever remain in my heart. I love her. Alright, so I re-entered the world of Tremaris. Here is an updated review. Hullo Goodreads, I bring to you today a book that I have read numerous times. Before I start out I'd like to say I'm quite nostalgic for this book. When I was a much younger reader I was (and let's get real I still am) deeply obsessed with Harry Potter. (Always.) I had no interest in reading other books, watching other movies, etc. Harry Potter was my life. So believe me when I say The Singer of all Songs has got to be good. It dragged me out of my book hangover kicking and screaming. Constable took my young thirteen-year-old heart and gracefully lulled it into a new story with sweet words and a simplistic writing style. A strong female lead, heroism, romance, tragedy, an intriguing magic system, and last but definitely not least impending doom. What more could you want? I also wanted to point out that the cover is just simply pretty. The best thing about this story, in my opinion, is how you can relate to the entire story. Calwyn, my first strong YA female lead feels this itch deep inside to break out of the confines of her home. (Which just so happens to be giant Ice walls) To do great things. To see the world. Darrow represents the surly boy. The surly boy who wants and needs to be saved. Though this story does target younger readers as an adult I found myself relating to the story as well. The magic system for example. I love that it's through singing. Because I can sing, right? Right?!?! That's tangible. How great is that? Constable also writes in an omniscient POV. This can feel strange in the story. There's no new chapter break to switch between characters, there are however line breaks so it's not really confusing. Though I still didn't particularly like this. When I'm wrapped up in one character for a lengthy amount of time, I don't necessarily like to be drug into someone else's POV in this manner. I found that it ruined the suspense in some of the events that occurred. But that could also be because I know this book well. I used to love Darrow but re-reading this I really feel like he is kind of a butt hole. He's closed off, he's short with Calwyn constantly...it's kind of irritating watching Calwyn seek his approval and her being denied and thwarted by his cruel words. Nobody has time for that Darrow. Tell her how you really feel! Anyways the bad guy is great with a real intent, Samis is a manipulative arse that you can kind of relate too. I love to hate/love my bad guys and that's where I am with Samis. I also never realized how young Calwyn's thinking is until I re-read the book as an adult and realized that this is a coming of age story. I simply enjoy this book so very much every single time I pick it up. I will forever have it in my home. I intend to spread the love for this book down to my children, and all around. I really think it should have hit off better than it did. Calwyn will always have a place in my heart, for teaching me what it means to be brave. To mess up and it'll be okay. To love without regrets. To cope and move forward. That friendship is stronger than any evil so long as you're loyal and kind. Who better to quest with than good ol' Cal, fierce little Mica, surly Tonno, goofy Trout, and I suppose Darrow will just have to tag along. Have a good day Goodreads, and pick up that book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was a good fantasy book for young adults. Calwyn is our heroine and she is training to be a priestess of Icecraft a form of chantment exclusive to the people in her country. Darrow is the strnger who has managed to cross the ice wall that protects her valley. Together they set out to stop a sorcerer's quest to rule all of their world. It was an easy read, being written for young adults. I enjoyed it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tammie

    I loved The Sings of All Songs. It reminds me a little of the Pellinor series which is one of my favorites, but this was nowhere as deep as Pelinor. The main thing they have in common is they both are fantasies with bardic type magic, which I’ve found to be rather rare in YA fantasy. I’m looking forward to reading the next book and I can't wait to see the relationship grow between Calwyn and Darrow.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wendi

    Great fantasy series to read. Just the type that are my favorite with the main charater being a girl. Very clean all around. I love the singing in it to work magic, and the harmony or discord relating to the earth and the magics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    This rating is for the whole series: The Singer of All Songs The Waterless Sea The Tenth Power I enjoyed all three books and had a hard time putting them down, which is why I was awake reading into the wee hours of the morning last night.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I was very pleasantly surprised. This book was different from what I normally read. I'm usually more into the darker fantasy novels. This one, though not overly light, was refreshing. It had a different quality than the others that are being produced.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karmee

    i really enjoyed this book. i found it very refreshing in that it is quite different from any other book i have ever read and i am eager to read the next book in the trilogy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hazel

    I really liked this one, I couldn't put it down... really hard for me to wait to get the other ones! She is one of my favorite authors now.

  30. 5 out of 5

    ⋟Kimari⋞

    If you liked this series, you might also enjoy: ✱ The Books of Pellinor series If you liked this series, you might also enjoy: ✱ The Books of Pellinor series

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