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A Fistful of Collars

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Author: Spencer Quinn

Published: September 11th 2012 by Atria Books

Format: Hardcover , 320 pages

Isbn: 9781451665161

Language: English


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Everyone’s favorite detective team returns in a new adventure as canine narrator Chet and his human partner P.I. Bernie Little find that Hollywood has gone to the dogs. Hoping to bring some Tinseltown money to the Valley, the mayor lures a movie studio to town to shoot their next production, a big-budget Western in the classic tradition. The star is none other than ruggedl Everyone’s favorite detective team returns in a new adventure as canine narrator Chet and his human partner P.I. Bernie Little find that Hollywood has gone to the dogs. Hoping to bring some Tinseltown money to the Valley, the mayor lures a movie studio to town to shoot their next production, a big-budget Western in the classic tradition. The star is none other than ruggedly handsome—and notoriously badly behaved—Thad Perry. When the mayor decides that someone needs to keep an eye on Thad so that he doesn’t get into too much trouble, Bernie and Chet are handpicked for the job. The money is good but something smells fishy, and what should have been a simple matter of babysitting soon gets more complicated—especially when they discover that Thad has a mysterious connection to the Valley that nobody wants to talk about. What kind of secret could Thad have left behind when he went to Hollywood to seek fame and fortune? The only people who might know the answer have a bad habit of turning up dead before they can talk. As Bernie’s relationship with his longtime girlfriend Suzie goes long-distance, and Chet’s late-night assignations appear to have resulted in an unexpected dividend, it’s all our two sleuths can do to keep Thad and his motley entourage of yes-men, handlers, and hangers-on in their sights. Worst of all, Thad is a self-proclaimed cat person, and his feline friend Brando has taken an instant dislike to Chet.

30 review for A Fistful of Collars

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    The fifth in the Chet and Bernie series, the adventures of the Little Detective agency as told by Chet, the partner who happens to be a dog, is the best yet, but I think that about every new entry in this series. I listened to this book (read by Jim Frangione, who does a great job) while walking my own dog, and likely got a reputation around town as a nut because I so often found myself laughing out loud. I think any dog owner will recognize the traits of dogdom in Chet's "voice." Although the do The fifth in the Chet and Bernie series, the adventures of the Little Detective agency as told by Chet, the partner who happens to be a dog, is the best yet, but I think that about every new entry in this series. I listened to this book (read by Jim Frangione, who does a great job) while walking my own dog, and likely got a reputation around town as a nut because I so often found myself laughing out loud. I think any dog owner will recognize the traits of dogdom in Chet's "voice." Although the dog tells the story, he has no special powers beyond those any dog of his size and training might have. We have often noticed how much effort our dog puts into trying to communicate with us -- and how often we probably fail to understand him. Chet is the same, so sometimes he "gets it" before Bernie and can't make him understand. And at other times, like any dog, he just gets distracted or confused. A Fistful of Collars finds Bernie and Chet hired to make sure all goes smoothly on a film shoot in their area of the San Fernando Valley. The star seems to be wrestling with some private demons which turn out to be connected to a cold case which turns into a hot one. The climax is very scary! As usual, the characters and setting measure up to the plot. I hope Chet and Bernie continue catching perps for a long time to come. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I've read about 1/3 of the Chet & Bernie series. Most of the ones I've read were quite good, this one was lacking a little bit in plot and too much inappropriate language. I can put up with some, but this one had more surprisingly than I was comfortable with. A Fistful of Collars is another Chet and Bernie mystery. For the uninitiated, Chet is the dog and the narrator of the tale. Bernie is his master and a private investigator. The titles are canine wordplays of well-known mysteries, though this I've read about 1/3 of the Chet & Bernie series. Most of the ones I've read were quite good, this one was lacking a little bit in plot and too much inappropriate language. I can put up with some, but this one had more surprisingly than I was comfortable with. A Fistful of Collars is another Chet and Bernie mystery. For the uninitiated, Chet is the dog and the narrator of the tale. Bernie is his master and a private investigator. The titles are canine wordplays of well-known mysteries, though this one plays on an old Clint Eastwood spaghetti Western, a Fistful of Dollars. It turns out Bernie is hired (he is always in need of money) to keep an eye on a temperamental movie star who is starring in a Western that is being filmed in the California desert valley where Bernie and Chet live. Thad Perry vaguely resembles Tom Cruise. When Bernie first meets him, Thad challenges him to a boxing match. Thad keeps in shape partly by doing boxing drills, but Bernie was an actual boxer while he was in the service. It is hard to tell whether Bernie’s “whupping” of Thad makes Thad angry or respectful. The plot gets curious and complicated. Bernie is hired not by the filming company or producers but by the mayor’s office. The mayor wants to make sure that Thad behaves and that the valley gets a good reputation in Hollywood. Chet and Bernie follow Thad’s main bodyguard to an abandoned neighborhood where he gives a mean looking guy a wad of money. When Bernie returns with some police friends, Chet finds that unsavory character dead from a stab wound. Bernie realizes there is more to Thad and company than meets the eye. Bernie’s girlfriend Suzie gets a great job opportunity and moves to Washington DC to work for a big-name newspaper there. Suzie recommends he gets in touch with a reporter whom she had worked with and seems to have made a connection between Thad and the valley. (N.B.: Keep in mind that all the narrative is from the dog’s perspective, so this valley, though in Southern California, is not THE Valley.) Bernie arranges a meeting with this reporter, but when he gets to the rendezvous, he discovers her body with a big stab wound in a dumpster. There are a number of other weird goings on. What started out as a glorified babysitting job becomes something else entirely. What is really bugging Thad Perry? What has his bodyguard been up to? Is there another reason why the mayor’s office is so interested in keeping an eye on Mr. Perry? Will Bernie and Suzie find true love? As with the past episodes in the series, A Fistful of Collars is well plotted, but kept down to earth and with comic relief as we see it all from Chet’s point of view. Oh yeah, Thad Perry has a pet—an enormous black cat. I'm a cat person, and am missing him terribly. I had to put him down about 5-6 weeks ago. Wah! Boo-hoo. Will be getting another one before too long.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Feit

    In the fifth book in the Chet and Bernie Mystery series, our favorite four-legged private investigator, Chet the Dog, and Bernie Little, his partner in the Little Detective Agency, are back on the job - - albeit not the usual missing persons case, or even the less-desired divorce work. He has been hired, on very generous financial terms, at the recommendation of the mayor’s office to make sure the young star in a new movie being filmed in their town stays out of trouble during the film shoot. Th In the fifth book in the Chet and Bernie Mystery series, our favorite four-legged private investigator, Chet the Dog, and Bernie Little, his partner in the Little Detective Agency, are back on the job - - albeit not the usual missing persons case, or even the less-desired divorce work. He has been hired, on very generous financial terms, at the recommendation of the mayor’s office to make sure the young star in a new movie being filmed in their town stays out of trouble during the film shoot. The Valley, a town in the southwest desert, is hopeful of becoming a mecca for movie-making if all goes smoothly. [A big “if,” in this instance, and definitely easier said than done.] Things are currently not going that smoothly in Bernie’s personal life, with his ex-wife continuing to be an annoyance [on good days] and his girlfriend, reporter Suzie Sanchez, having been offered a job with the Washington Post. This delightful series brings the reader a mystery, a dead body or two [or three], and somehow makes Chet [who narrates the tale] a completely believable sidekick. He is the devoted companion to Bernie, an ex-cop and wounded war vet, but brings his own special talents to the job, and is completely irresistible. Well-plotted, this charming novel is the perfect thing when one wants to hunker down on a cold winter’s night – or any other night, for that matter. Recommended.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Reynolds Darke

    Re-read. The mayor's office hires The Little Detective Agency (Chet the dog and Bernie Little) to assist security with a movie shoot. Like the others in this series everything is entirely POV of Chet, the fully trained police dog who failed his final exam. Bernie is the very capable PI who rescued Chet. Chet also understands English and narrates the story. This fifth book in the series seems to be a little less focused than the previous four and loses the fifth star. These books are a lot of fun!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    'Chet the jet'! ... my favourite dog. Great light reading, cheers me up every time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ms.pegasus

    Chet (the dog) and Bernie Little (the guy), are partners in the Little Detective Agency, for those unfamiliar with the series. (No need to worry about reading them in order, although there are some allusions to past events). Improbably, Chet and Bernie are hired by the mayor's office to keep a big name celebrity with modest acting credentials, Thad Perry, safe from his own excesses while he is in town to shoot a new movie. The mayor is interested in establishing the town as a filming mecca, but Chet (the dog) and Bernie Little (the guy), are partners in the Little Detective Agency, for those unfamiliar with the series. (No need to worry about reading them in order, although there are some allusions to past events). Improbably, Chet and Bernie are hired by the mayor's office to keep a big name celebrity with modest acting credentials, Thad Perry, safe from his own excesses while he is in town to shoot a new movie. The mayor is interested in establishing the town as a filming mecca, but Bernie has previously been a vocal opponent of the mayor's environmental policies, so the gig comes as a bit of a surprise, though not an unwelcome one. The pay is considerably more than Bernie's normal rate. Plus a bonus is promised if the assignment ends successfully. Thad is a decent enough actor, but otherwise a complete jerk. Of course, other complications are bound to ensue. Thad's bodyguard seems a bit off to Bernie, and information on a daily basis leaks like a mangled faucet as evidenced by the mayor's security liaison, Cal Luxton's coy remarks and frequent phone calls. The worst part for Chet, however, is that Thad is a cat person, and is accompanied everywhere by his cat, Brando. Chet puzzles: “Cat person? I tried to make sense of that idea and failed completely.” Nevertheless, Chet does his best to assume a professional attitude. Overall, he's more creeped out by Brando the cat than hostile. How does he move so silently, converting his pudgy body into a gliding presence? How does he do that stretching thing with his back? And what's with those eyes, narrow slits staring at him with indifference in the desert sunlight? As always, this was fun to read. Chet is an entertaining narrator, and he continues to puzzle over idioms and inferences connecting cause and effect. On the other hand, touch, smell and hearing are his strong suites. A nighttime probe prompts Chet to muse: “Day or night doesn't make much difference to me, but it's a game changer for humans. They can't seem to see at all in the dark, and what's there to fall back on? Hearing? Smell? Please. So it's no surprise to me that nighttime is when humans tend to land in trouble. Don't get me wrong. I liked just about every human I've ever met, even some of the perps and gangbangers, but in my opinion they're at their best right before lunchtime.” Nevertheless, this was not one of my favorites in the series. For one thing, I missed Suzie's encouraging presence. She is absent for a large part of the story, although she does play a role in the case. For another, Quinn usually endows his secondary characters with a fuller arsenal of quirky traits that add to the humor. Finally, he barely scratches the surface in exploiting the film setting with it's collection of Hollywood egos. Still, a romp with Chet and Bernie is always fun, and this book did not disappoint.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Chet the dog and his private investigator companion, Bernie Little, set out on case number 5 in this New York Times Bestseller series, Chet and Bernie Mysteries. The mayor of the valley decides to bring some extra revenue to town by luring a Hollywood studio to shoot a big budget movie there starring movie idol, Thad Perry. Chet and Bernie are approached to keep an eye on the movie star who is known to have been a bit wild and unreliable in the past and is now under contract with the studio to d Chet the dog and his private investigator companion, Bernie Little, set out on case number 5 in this New York Times Bestseller series, Chet and Bernie Mysteries. The mayor of the valley decides to bring some extra revenue to town by luring a Hollywood studio to shoot a big budget movie there starring movie idol, Thad Perry. Chet and Bernie are approached to keep an eye on the movie star who is known to have been a bit wild and unreliable in the past and is now under contract with the studio to deliver on time or be fired. The mayor wants the studio folks to be happy so they will come back again and he offers Chet and Bernie big money to keep Thad in line. Tempted by the lucrative paycheque, Chet and Bernie take the job and it isn’t too long before a mystery begins to unfold which connects Thad Perry to the valley and to an unsolved crime a couple of decades before. This is the first book of the series I have read and from the start, I loved it. This story is written from an unusual perspective as the narrator is Chet the dog! Spencer Quinn does a good job of giving Chet a credible voice and he describes the relationship between dogs and their companions very well. It is clear that both Chet and Bernie adore each other and Chet’s unconditional love of Bernie is heart warming and funny at times. It wasn’t long before I was cheering them along too. The plot of the mystery is well written and there are a couple of twists and turns which are surprising. That I had not read the previous books in the series did not detract from my enjoyment of this story. I will definitely be reading more Chet and Bernie Mysteries and would encourage you to do so too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tex

    There's truly no greater love than between a dog and his person. These Chet and Bernie stories emphasize just how close that bond is. It's been a while since I read something in the series, but in this one, I really felt the pace of Chet the Dog's thoughts and just how they flit from one thing to the next, but always, always staying right in focus with Bernie. In this story, there's a movie set element.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Another solid Chet & Bernie mystery. Chet is one of my favorite narrators in literature. I love dogs and I find Chet delightful, if somewhat frustrating at times. It does get a little repetitive at times, especially if you listen to too many in a row, so I'll probably take a break from Chet & Bernie for a little while, even though I haven't caught up to all the ones that have been published, yet. If you're looking for a light cozy mystery, I don't think you can go wrong with a Chet & Bernie stor Another solid Chet & Bernie mystery. Chet is one of my favorite narrators in literature. I love dogs and I find Chet delightful, if somewhat frustrating at times. It does get a little repetitive at times, especially if you listen to too many in a row, so I'll probably take a break from Chet & Bernie for a little while, even though I haven't caught up to all the ones that have been published, yet. If you're looking for a light cozy mystery, I don't think you can go wrong with a Chet & Bernie story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    janetandjohn

    Dog as Detective. Lovely idea, cleverly written and Chet the dog and Bernie the ex-cop are a brilliant team in the eyes of Chet. And if you know dogs you will recognise everything that Chet does and thinks. Other reviewers will have given you more of the story, so I'll just say "Go, Chet!"

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Oliver

    Audiobook: I love Chet and I will not lie. That dog is awesome. The Chet and Bernie mysteries satisfy mystery lovers, humor, and make fantastic road trip entertainment for both adults and kids. I am so glad I found Chet!

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Szatkowski

    The series is OK, but were it it going? I've read the first 5 books int he series. I like the premise - the dog is the narrator, but its starting to feel like reading the same book with different character names (as opposed to moving a plot arc along, or growing the characters themselves).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Thompson

    I do like these Chet and Bernie mysteries - Chet is one of the most fun narrators I've read. But this one was definitely a cut below the other four I've read. The plot was so-so and took a long time to really get started.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    A charming book, "pure and simple".

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    As Chet and Bernie Stories go, this plot line was most definitely not my favorite. Although, Chet our intrepid 100+ pound dog is still trotting along with his doggie narrative continues to amuse me, Bernie's actions irked me a bit. Bernie's one and only job is to keep a trouble-making Hollywood Star out of the tabloids and out of trouble. Yet, because of his personal sense of justice and a nose for smelling trouble and feelings to "fix" things, Bernie is everywhere but watching the Star. I found i As Chet and Bernie Stories go, this plot line was most definitely not my favorite. Although, Chet our intrepid 100+ pound dog is still trotting along with his doggie narrative continues to amuse me, Bernie's actions irked me a bit. Bernie's one and only job is to keep a trouble-making Hollywood Star out of the tabloids and out of trouble. Yet, because of his personal sense of justice and a nose for smelling trouble and feelings to "fix" things, Bernie is everywhere but watching the Star. I found it irritating, irresponsible and a bit boring.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve Shilstone

    First canine narrated private eye tale. Clever and amusing. 4 solid woofs.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Another entertaining entry in this series. I think Quinn is getting better and better at inserting little bits and pieces of Chet's narration for humor. I love this series! :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    ☺Trish

    Another quick, fun read. I really didn't like many of the secondary characters involved in this mystery - they were a pretty unsavory, unlikable bunch.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Gold

    The idea of Spencer Quinn’s Chet and Bernie Mysteries has appealed to me for years, but because I don’t like mystery novels, I’ve never read one. When Simon and Schuster made A Fistful of Collars--to be released in a few days--available for review via GalleyCat, I decided to give the series a try. I’m so glad I did; not only did I find the book a very refreshing read, I’ve discovered a series I can wholeheartedly recommend to a Very Picky Reader, my husband. My interest in the series was its The idea of Spencer Quinn’s Chet and Bernie Mysteries has appealed to me for years, but because I don’t like mystery novels, I’ve never read one. When Simon and Schuster made A Fistful of Collars--to be released in a few days--available for review via GalleyCat, I decided to give the series a try. I’m so glad I did; not only did I find the book a very refreshing read, I’ve discovered a series I can wholeheartedly recommend to a Very Picky Reader, my husband. My interest in the series was its canine narrator, which is the same reason why I know my husband, who has a very quirky sense of humor, will like it. I piqued my husband’s interest in giving the series a try when I told him that when Chet thinks too hard, he needs a nap. I cemented it with a bit of reading aloud, which conveyed the “dogginess” Quinn achieved. For those of you who read werewolf stories, if you liked MaryJanice Davidson’s Derik’s Bane, you’ll understand what I mean. Like Davidson, Quinn captures in Chet that doggy essence. Here are the bits and pieces I read aloud after telling my husband that the series revolves around an ex-cop turned P.I. named Bernie and Chet, his K-9 dropout companion: “Had much experience with mushrooms, Bernie?” he said. “Nope,” said Bernie Whoa. Nope? Had he forgotten that huge and tasty mushroom we’d found in the woods on the Big Bear Case? And didn’t Bernie love to throw little white mushrooms on the barbeque when we grill burgers? Which I hoped would be happening again real soon. I could just about smell them! In fact, with a little more effort, I actually...yes! I smelled burgers. I’d made myself smell burgers when there were none around--wow! What a life. Had something just been bothering me? Whatever it was, poof! “Come here, big guy.” I moved closer to Bernie. He gave me a nice pat. His gaze was still on the empty intersection down the street. I let that slip my mind and just concentrated on the pat. You can feel things in the hands of humans, things that are happening deep inside them. I felt what was happening inside Bernie.” “Boo Ferris?” “At your service. Hey, Chet, lookin’ good.” Boo Ferris! And no longer sporting an orange jumpsuit. What a nice perp! He’d hijacked an eighteen-wheeler loaded with tequila that actually turned out to be prom dresses an he’d tried to make his escape wearing one. The fun we’d had! A tiny breeze swept by, bringing the smell of Thad’s breath my way: toothpaste and mouthwash on the top layer, licorice below that--the red kind--and down at the bottum, uh-oh, what was this? Cocaine! Yes. And not only cocaine, but Oxycontin as well. How did I know? K-9 school, out of which I’d flunked on my last day, with only the leaping test left, and leaping has been my very best thing as long as I could remember. Was a cat involved? Better believe it. My husband will like this book and the larger series both for the mystery and the doggie narrator; he likes suspense and funny thrillers (for years he read the Stephanie Plum books). I was willing to read the very serviceable mystery simply to hang out with Chet. He'll also like A Fistful of Collars because, IMHO as a book savant, it’ll appeal to readers who like Christopher Moore. It's a sensibility thing. Sorry I didn’t get into the narrative; I figure you’ll get that from the synopsis and other reviews.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lelia Taylor

    Books featuring animals, particularly dogs and cats, are very popular with many readers. Especially in the mystery field, they appear as major characters, talking among themselves and sometimes to their favorite humans and frequently they sleuth with vim and vigor. Do readers find this entertaining? A lot of us do but there are also many who wouldn’t read one of these books under any circumstances. Usually, it’s because they don’t like the aspect of the animals acting like humans. And then there’ Books featuring animals, particularly dogs and cats, are very popular with many readers. Especially in the mystery field, they appear as major characters, talking among themselves and sometimes to their favorite humans and frequently they sleuth with vim and vigor. Do readers find this entertaining? A lot of us do but there are also many who wouldn’t read one of these books under any circumstances. Usually, it’s because they don’t like the aspect of the animals acting like humans. And then there’s Chet. Chet and Bernie make an unusual pair of detectives and, yes, Chet does contribute to their investigations but not through supernatural or Beatrix Potterish means. Chet is a K-9 school flunkee so he “knows” a bit about detective work but he is, in fact, a dog and his sleuthing generally involves him pursuing normal dog routines, such as following scents. What makes Chet different in the mystery novel arena is (1) his close bond with Bernie and (2) his narration of the story. Seeing and hearing the story through Chet’s eyes and voice is fun, especially when he ruminates on the strange ways of Bernie and other humans and offers his observations on life during the investigations, not to Bernie but to the reader. The enticing things that distract him at any given moment, squirrels and burgers and so forth, add to the charm and his devotion to Bernie (and Bernie’s devotion to Chet) is completely natural. Is this a gripping, intellectual thriller? No, not at all, but the puzzle and the resultant inquiries are engaging. Add in the pleasures of Chet’s and Bernie’s partnership and the reader will enjoy a few hours of pure entertainment with more than the occasional smile. I’ve had fun with every Chet and Bernie Mystery so far and A Fistful of Collars is another good one. Oh, and you don’t want to miss Brando the cat. (Psst. Check out Quinn‘s new short story, A Cat Was Involved, to finally learn how Chet failed K-9 school.) Reviewed by Lelia Taylor, September 2012.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A fun and clever mystery where the PI's dog is the narrator. It's clear the author has spent a great deal of time imagining his own canines' thought processes. Chet's world is full of smells and adoration of Bernie and not-so-deep thoughts and the satisfaction of catching perps. The charms of an unusual narrator: "It's all right," Bernie said, lowering his hand. "We're here to help." Went without mentioning: that was what we did. Although who were we helping, exactly? I hoped to find out soon, b A fun and clever mystery where the PI's dog is the narrator. It's clear the author has spent a great deal of time imagining his own canines' thought processes. Chet's world is full of smells and adoration of Bernie and not-so-deep thoughts and the satisfaction of catching perps. The charms of an unusual narrator: "It's all right," Bernie said, lowering his hand. "We're here to help." Went without mentioning: that was what we did. Although who were we helping, exactly? I hoped to find out soon, but if not I was cool with that, too.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael crage

    This book was somewhat different than any other I have ever read. It said on the cover "A Chet and Bernie Mystery". Turns out that Bernie is a PI and Chet, his partner, is a large dog. The book is entirely told from the view point of the dog. I did not really care for the author's style of writing. So I only gave it 3 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Bernie and Chet are a team. Bernie is a private investigator. Lately, Bernie has been feeling the pinch in his financial situation. If it was not for this, he probably would have argued more with the Mayor about his latest job. The mayor wants to hire Bernie to baby sit a movie star. The town is the setting for a movie and Thad Perry is the star. Bernie is no one’s baby sitter but the money is good. It seems that Bernie will have to earn his money when someone tries to go after Thad. A Fistful o Bernie and Chet are a team. Bernie is a private investigator. Lately, Bernie has been feeling the pinch in his financial situation. If it was not for this, he probably would have argued more with the Mayor about his latest job. The mayor wants to hire Bernie to baby sit a movie star. The town is the setting for a movie and Thad Perry is the star. Bernie is no one’s baby sitter but the money is good. It seems that Bernie will have to earn his money when someone tries to go after Thad. A Fistful of Collars is book five of the Chet and Bernie mystery books. I have been eyeing this series for a while but just never found a chance to check any of the books out until now. This is why it is a good thing that this book can be read as a stand alone novel. I thought this was a fun, charming read. Nothing to serious about it. This is what I liked the most. The characters were goofy but entertaining. I loved Chet. He is a great narrator. His input was valuable, funny, and observant like a dog. Bernie is lucky that the case he has goes so easy for him. At times I wonder about him. He seems like a dim wit but a likable dim wit. I do plan to go back and check out the rest of the prior novels. A Fistful of Collars is a man’s best friend of a read!

  24. 5 out of 5

    P.M.

    My favorite narrator, Chet the Jet, the better half of the Little Detective Agency is back to solve a cold case crime. The case starts normally enough with Bernie Little being hired to make sure that a movie being shot in the valley proceeds with no slip-ups. That won't be easy since Thad Perry, the star, has major addiction problems. The reader knows the case will be solved with what Chet brings to the table. But Chet is under suspicion once Iggy's owner lets the proverbial cat out of the bag w My favorite narrator, Chet the Jet, the better half of the Little Detective Agency is back to solve a cold case crime. The case starts normally enough with Bernie Little being hired to make sure that a movie being shot in the valley proceeds with no slip-ups. That won't be easy since Thad Perry, the star, has major addiction problems. The reader knows the case will be solved with what Chet brings to the table. But Chet is under suspicion once Iggy's owner lets the proverbial cat out of the bag when he suggests to Bernie that Chet has been involved in midnight assignations in the canyon. These assignations have produced a puppy who is the spitting image of Chet. But not to worry - Chet and Bernie team up and solve the case. Needless to say - I love Chet and Chet was super Chet in this book. The only thing I missed was that he has no opportunity to "grab a perp by the pant leg." However, Chet did become airborne and took Jiggs down when he threatened Charlie. Chet also displayed his heroics when he defeated Outlaw. I only have one complaint - when will the next book be out?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    The fifth and latest entry in the wonderful Chet & Bernie series, featuring the PI team of Bernie Little and his canine partner Chet, who narrates the stories. In this mystery, Chet & Bernie are hired to ‘babysit’ a well-known film star, known to go astray, while he is in town shooting a new movie. Nothing is ever as straight-forward as it seems, though, and the boys are soon digging up secrets from the past. For more plot details, see Shelleyrae’s full review at Book’d Out. I love this series. Yo The fifth and latest entry in the wonderful Chet & Bernie series, featuring the PI team of Bernie Little and his canine partner Chet, who narrates the stories. In this mystery, Chet & Bernie are hired to ‘babysit’ a well-known film star, known to go astray, while he is in town shooting a new movie. Nothing is ever as straight-forward as it seems, though, and the boys are soon digging up secrets from the past. For more plot details, see Shelleyrae’s full review at Book’d Out. I love this series. You might think that a mystery narrated by a dog is too cutesie, but Quinn saves them from that with Chet’s professional attitude and zest for life. As he says: I started to cheer up, partly because Bernie told me to and partly because, well, how long can you stay down in the dumps? Read this if: you enjoy a solid mystery that’s not overly cozy but still clean; you’re a dog-lover & a mystery fan; or you’re reading the series and want the latest installment of SoCal’s smartest PI team. 4 stars

  26. 5 out of 5

    CupcakeBlonde

    I really love these books. Having the story told to you from Chet's perspective never gets old. And the danger/mystery/suspense seems to get more exciting with each book. The only thing I could say I did not like with this book was the rmeoval of Susie. I just finished saying how much I loved Susie being more involved in the last book and how well she works with Chet and Bernie and then she gets a new job in D.C! I really miss the dynamic between her and Bernie and how great she is at helping ou I really love these books. Having the story told to you from Chet's perspective never gets old. And the danger/mystery/suspense seems to get more exciting with each book. The only thing I could say I did not like with this book was the rmeoval of Susie. I just finished saying how much I loved Susie being more involved in the last book and how well she works with Chet and Bernie and then she gets a new job in D.C! I really miss the dynamic between her and Bernie and how great she is at helping out. I'm hoping she'll come back soon! I am anxious to see how Chet's little "mishap" across the canyon works out. Something big has to be brewing with his little clone. This book certainly had the most danger and the most dead bodies so far. The stakes are getting higher and Chet and Bernie better look out. I loved the addition of Brando and hope he turns up again. Nice to see Chet going up against a cat with attitude.

  27. 5 out of 5

    kari

    Chet and Bernie. What a team! Life is good when you get to ride along in the shotgun seat with the wind in your face. What could be better? These are the thoughts of Chet, the detective dog, who assists his human Bernie is solving cases. The story is told through Chet's voice and the author seems to have a great knowledge of how a dog would think. Occasionally, Chet will begin to have a deep thought, but then he'll give himself a good shake and stop that right away. And yet, Chet's outlook on li Chet and Bernie. What a team! Life is good when you get to ride along in the shotgun seat with the wind in your face. What could be better? These are the thoughts of Chet, the detective dog, who assists his human Bernie is solving cases. The story is told through Chet's voice and the author seems to have a great knowledge of how a dog would think. Occasionally, Chet will begin to have a deep thought, but then he'll give himself a good shake and stop that right away. And yet, Chet's outlook on like is fairly profound. If you get to spend your days with the people you love doing what you love, what more could you want? I'm not going to get deeply into the plot because you'll want to read it for yourself. This is more straightforward than some of the other stories with less red herrings (Chet would ask when did we have herring?) and it is always interesting to see how Bernie puts things together through Chet's eyes. These books are great fun. I highly recommend them.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karin

    Chet and Bernie are back, although Suzie has taken a job in Washington, DC, so they are now long-distance. Bernie Little is hired, along with his side-kick and partner, Chet, are hired to keep an eye on famous actor Thad Perry for a great deal of money. Did they ever get paid? Hard to say, Chet didn't mention it. But things were not all neat and tidy, and soon Bernie and Chet are on the trail of mystery, mayhem and murder. One thing leads to another, with some nasty scenes with a cat in there an Chet and Bernie are back, although Suzie has taken a job in Washington, DC, so they are now long-distance. Bernie Little is hired, along with his side-kick and partner, Chet, are hired to keep an eye on famous actor Thad Perry for a great deal of money. Did they ever get paid? Hard to say, Chet didn't mention it. But things were not all neat and tidy, and soon Bernie and Chet are on the trail of mystery, mayhem and murder. One thing leads to another, with some nasty scenes with a cat in there and more than a few tasty treats, and soon the private detective duo are hot on the trail of the perp, and Chet hopes to sink his teeth into the perp's pant leg. Just what Chet sinks his teeth into in this book remains to be seen once you read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ml Bros

    I gave this a really low rating because I can not stand at times Bernie, supposedly the smartest person in the room. I really like these stories narrated by Chet the dog. He is funny and sweet but I do not particularly like Bernie. Bernie might be a great detective but he can not hold a dollar bill without losing it and I do mean physically dropping it or falling out of his pocket or spending it on some crappy investment. If he is so darn smart how can he not even support himself or his own chil I gave this a really low rating because I can not stand at times Bernie, supposedly the smartest person in the room. I really like these stories narrated by Chet the dog. He is funny and sweet but I do not particularly like Bernie. Bernie might be a great detective but he can not hold a dollar bill without losing it and I do mean physically dropping it or falling out of his pocket or spending it on some crappy investment. If he is so darn smart how can he not even support himself or his own child. If I had been his exwife Leda I would have ran for the door years ago. Plus please no more lectures on the water table disappearing in California. California is a mess and most of us have figured it out.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kwoomac

    Another fun Chet and Bernie mystery. As I've said before, I just love how author Spencer Quinn is so good at telling the story from Chet's persective. And I was super-happy that nothing terrible happened to Chet in this book. In the past, I've gotten a little angry with Bernie for putting Chet in harm's way. This time around, Chet was heroic without the whole is-he-gonna-survive worries. Certainly not for everyone. I have heard that there are people out there who don't like books that are told fr Another fun Chet and Bernie mystery. As I've said before, I just love how author Spencer Quinn is so good at telling the story from Chet's persective. And I was super-happy that nothing terrible happened to Chet in this book. In the past, I've gotten a little angry with Bernie for putting Chet in harm's way. This time around, Chet was heroic without the whole is-he-gonna-survive worries. Certainly not for everyone. I have heard that there are people out there who don't like books that are told from an animal's perspective! Since I always anthropomorphize my pets (as well I should, I know what they're thinking!), this is perfect for me.

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