kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Say Zoop! (Toddler Learning Book, Preschool Learning Book, Interactive Children’s Books)

Availability: Ready to download

PRESS HERE, MIX IT UP!, LET'S PLAY! and now SAY ZOOP! Collect all four interactive books from Hervé Tullet! Make some noise! Shout "OH!" Whisper "oh!" Say "Zoop"? Yes! "Zoop!" "Zoop!" "Zoop!" The newest book from Hervé Tullet magically responds with bursts of color and moving shapes, empowering children by letting their imaginations liberate and direct each page's reaction. PRESS HERE, MIX IT UP!, LET'S PLAY! and now SAY ZOOP! Collect all four interactive books from Hervé Tullet! Make some noise! Shout "OH!" Whisper "oh!" Say "Zoop"? Yes! "Zoop!" "Zoop!" "Zoop!" The newest book from Hervé Tullet magically responds with bursts of color and moving shapes, empowering children by letting their imaginations liberate and direct each page's reaction. Tullet's books define the genre of participatory bookmaking, encouraging readers to explore and interact with the physical book in all its dimensions. The reward is tremendous: a journey of whimsy and sheer fun that extends well beyond the book's pages. In this worthy and exhilarating companion to the bestselling trio launched with Press Here, Tullet's beloved dots will have readers literally "Ooh"-ing and "Ahh"-ing out loud in a happy collective encore.


Compare
kode adsense disini

PRESS HERE, MIX IT UP!, LET'S PLAY! and now SAY ZOOP! Collect all four interactive books from Hervé Tullet! Make some noise! Shout "OH!" Whisper "oh!" Say "Zoop"? Yes! "Zoop!" "Zoop!" "Zoop!" The newest book from Hervé Tullet magically responds with bursts of color and moving shapes, empowering children by letting their imaginations liberate and direct each page's reaction. PRESS HERE, MIX IT UP!, LET'S PLAY! and now SAY ZOOP! Collect all four interactive books from Hervé Tullet! Make some noise! Shout "OH!" Whisper "oh!" Say "Zoop"? Yes! "Zoop!" "Zoop!" "Zoop!" The newest book from Hervé Tullet magically responds with bursts of color and moving shapes, empowering children by letting their imaginations liberate and direct each page's reaction. Tullet's books define the genre of participatory bookmaking, encouraging readers to explore and interact with the physical book in all its dimensions. The reward is tremendous: a journey of whimsy and sheer fun that extends well beyond the book's pages. In this worthy and exhilarating companion to the bestselling trio launched with Press Here, Tullet's beloved dots will have readers literally "Ooh"-ing and "Ahh"-ing out loud in a happy collective encore.

30 review for Say Zoop! (Toddler Learning Book, Preschool Learning Book, Interactive Children’s Books)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caterina

    Fantastic early childhood/early elementary interactive book with sounds (from the mouth of the child! -- not those horrible noisy computerized book-toys), touch, movements, colors, even imaginary conversations and child-composed songs -- all accomplished with painted dots and a few printed words. Even better and more fun than the amazing "Press Here" because it allows for greater exercise of the imagination.

  2. 5 out of 5

    gina

    Parents: let me break it down for you real style. This shit will not fly at bedtime. Oh my kid loved it. But it's a gazillion pages long. And god help you if you miss one. "Mommy where's the page that...." then you're flipping through and he's all like "you missed that one!" and you're have to redo all the pages you did already read before you tried to flip six pages at once so you'd get done sooner. Look. We read several books at bedtime and this book is so long and takes so long that there's n Parents: let me break it down for you real style. This shit will not fly at bedtime. Oh my kid loved it. But it's a gazillion pages long. And god help you if you miss one. "Mommy where's the page that...." then you're flipping through and he's all like "you missed that one!" and you're have to redo all the pages you did already read before you tried to flip six pages at once so you'd get done sooner. Look. We read several books at bedtime and this book is so long and takes so long that there's no damn way you can fit in other books but you can't tell Jr. no. So. Yeah. Pass on this book. Would be great for a nanny to do with kiddo, or for those of you who read picture books during the day (we work during the day, so pass on that idea too). Teachers or librarians who can somehow manage an interactive book with a crowd will like it. All that said my son (3.5) enjoyed it. I didn't tell him I returned it to the library. I'm hoping he won't think of it again (it wasn't a "winner" that we had to read every night anyway, just occasionally).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This book is a hoot to read to your husband as he pleads with you to stop! I think children and those young at heart will have a lot of fun with this book. Kids will learn about volume, size and color. Might be too energetic of a read right before bedtime.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Great book that encourages interaction (touch and sound) with art. Children will love adding sounds to the abstract pictures.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    This was the winner I needed when a Pre-K class stopped in with zero forewarning and wanted a story. The kids were ALL in.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I don't understand this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: SAY ZOOP! by Hervé Tullet, Chronicle, August 2017, 64p., ISBN: 978-1-4521-6473-1 “Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh You don’t have to go, oh, oh, oh, oh” -- Led Zepplin, “D’yer Maker” (1973) “Wait a minute! What am I hearing? Gentleman, follow me. Say, ‘ice cream.’” “Ice cream. But I don’t sing it if that’s what you’re getting at.” “All right, all right, talk then. But down here.” “Ice cream.” “Talk slow.” “Ice cream.” “You see? Singing is only sustained talking. Now you.” “Ice cream.” “Now you. Righ Richie’s Picks: SAY ZOOP! by Hervé Tullet, Chronicle, August 2017, 64p., ISBN: 978-1-4521-6473-1 “Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, oh You don’t have to go, oh, oh, oh, oh” -- Led Zepplin, “D’yer Maker” (1973) “Wait a minute! What am I hearing? Gentleman, follow me. Say, ‘ice cream.’” “Ice cream. But I don’t sing it if that’s what you’re getting at.” “All right, all right, talk then. But down here.” “Ice cream.” “Talk slow.” “Ice cream.” “You see? Singing is only sustained talking. Now you.” “Ice cream.” “Now you. Right here.” “Ice cream.” “Now you, sir.” “Ice cream.” “I didn’t know we could do that.” -- Professor Harold Hill and the River City School Board in The Music Man “READY FOR THE NEXT STEP? OK. LIFT YOUR FINGER. TAKE IN A DEEP, DEEP BREATH… AND THEN LET OUT THE LONGEST OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH! IN THE WHOLE WORLD! HOW ABOUT TAKING A DIVE? ON THREE...TWO...ONE...GO! OH! OH! OH! OH! OH! OH! OH! OH! OH! TERRIFIC!” Hervé Tullet’s PRESS HERE (Chronicle, 2011) is an exceptionally imaginative, interactive picture book. Tullet has since expanded on his original concept for PRESS HERE to create more new-fangled,old-school, interactive books. After writing about PRESS HERE, I didn’t really have more to say about them. Until now. While sticking with his now-well-known illustrative style of primary-color dots on a white background, SAY ZOOP! goes in a whole new direction. It’s a must-have book for elementary school music teachers to share with their first and second graders. The book begins by instructing the reader/audience to put their finger on a dot and say OH! Then, we move on to making little OHs and big OHs and then to following patterns of alternating big and little OHs. We make bigger and bigger OHs. We count in OHs. We verbally hop in OHs. We cry in OHs. Then comes a second sound: AH! Now, we can split an audience into two groups, the OHs and the AHs. After some exercises involving interacting OHs and AHs, we add animal noise ROOOOHs and RAAAAHs. Then we add WAAHOO! and other new sounds like ZOOP.. And the expanding goes on. I can easily see teachers encouraging their kids to sing songs they know, substituting the OHs and AHs for the real lyrics. Singing rounds of OHs and AHs. Composing their own OH and AH tunes. Raising their hand and asking in OHs and AHs to go to the bathroom. SAY ZOOP! is an AH of OHs that you don’t want to miss. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alyson (Kid Lit Frenzy)

    Next to the first one (Press Here) in the series I might like this one the best.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    My two-year-old giggles his way through this book, touching the pages and making the sounds as directed. We got this from the library, but we may have to buy it. Another winner from Hervé Tullet!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Lower

    Another great book by Tullet! Very interactive, this time adding more sounds with actions. So much fun! Definitely another go-to book for story times.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I like the first couple in this series better.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Not nearly as good as Press Here, but could be fun.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Not quite as good as Press Here or Mix It Up.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andy Plemmons

    This is another incredible Tullet book that has to be experienced. This one goes to a whole new level because no reading will really ever be the same. Each reader or group of readers will perform the ohs, ahs, and wahoos in different ways. There are so many connections to music that I'm sure music and art educators will love to collaborate with this book. It begs to be performed by as many people as possible. True Tullet playfulness.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Tyler

    The average toddler has the attention span of the time it takes to …..SQUIRREL! Many modern children’s books are packed full of flaps, textures and gimmicks in the desperate hope that they can draw the reader away from CBeebies for just five minutes. To grab them and keep them, your book should be short, punchy and fun. What you don’t want to do is take a reasonable idea and play it out for page, after page, after page. What’s that ….. SQUIRREL! Interaction is a powerful tool in children’s litera The average toddler has the attention span of the time it takes to …..SQUIRREL! Many modern children’s books are packed full of flaps, textures and gimmicks in the desperate hope that they can draw the reader away from CBeebies for just five minutes. To grab them and keep them, your book should be short, punchy and fun. What you don’t want to do is take a reasonable idea and play it out for page, after page, after page. What’s that ….. SQUIRREL! Interaction is a powerful tool in children’s literature. Stories can be fun, but sometimes a baby/toddler just wants to grab things and have a whale of a time. ‘‘Say Zoop!’’ by Herve Tullet should be that book as you have to interact with every page. There are a series of dots and instructions that you must follow from saying a quiet oh on a small dot to a loud oh on a big dot. Tullet takes you down an avenue of adventure as the tasks and dots get trickier, but this is one avenue that will prove a little too long for many. It is clear to see that Herve’s heart was in the right place when designing ‘‘Zoop!’’, it has a simple and universal appeal as children love to press things and make funny noises. It is just that to the average toddler it is not them that makes the noise themselves, but the toy or book. ‘‘Zoop!’’ continuously encourages you to press here and do that, but all the interaction comes from the reader. In truth this is a very flat book that does not do anything for itself. If the book had been 12 pages this would not have been an issue. A toddler would learn to know what to do, but the book is not this short. It is not even 32 pages long, but 64. I am not usually one for advocating the shortening of children’s books, but in this case the concept goes on for far too long. There will be very few children that will want to keep going all the way. The art style is simple and appealing, but it won’t keep a toddler coming back for more and more. This is a shame as the game gets twisty and turny as you make bird noises or robot noises, but 64 pages of the same type of things is not that appealing. Perhaps if flaps had been added the book would capture the attention more. As it is, the book feels a little like an art project being sold as a children’s book. Parents may appreciate the stripped back art style and intriguing interaction, but a child will go back to their Peppa Pig book with the oink buttons. Original review on thebookbag.co.uk

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    I'm a little over the interactive picture books.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Library_geek

    I am sure many of you have seen Herve’ Tullet books before and know just how much fun they can be. For those unfamiliar with this author, be prepared to go on an adventure where you will Ohhhhhh, Raaaaah, Wahoooooo, Ah and ZOOP! Say Zoop! is a book like no other, Herve’ Tullet is unique in his approach to literacy and learning. This whimsical, colourful, interactive book will have your young child singing, SHOUTING, and whispering their way through it. This book is a set of ideas and directions t I am sure many of you have seen Herve’ Tullet books before and know just how much fun they can be. For those unfamiliar with this author, be prepared to go on an adventure where you will Ohhhhhh, Raaaaah, Wahoooooo, Ah and ZOOP! Say Zoop! is a book like no other, Herve’ Tullet is unique in his approach to literacy and learning. This whimsical, colourful, interactive book will have your young child singing, SHOUTING, and whispering their way through it. This book is a set of ideas and directions that engage the reader in activities and idea forming. For example: The children use their fingers to run along the shapes, lines and splodges when reading the ideas and directions, such as: Look, A trampoline! Careful. It can get a bit bouncy! AhAHAHAAAH, WAAHAHOO, WAAHOO, OOOOOHHOHOH, BRAVO! This book is great for child development. In particular, fine motor skills, hand eye coordination, critical thinking, following basic instructions and language development, just by the simple act of engaging with this book through touch, listening to and repeating words, and understanding the link between the ideas and actions. More importantly (in my opinion) is that it feeds the imagination, and encourages the reader to think creatively. There are only two issues I have with the book, the first being that I feel that the text seems to get lost among the illustrations, making it difficult for the young or new reader to read the book for themselves. Secondly, I often look at Herve’ Tullet books and think they are too long. However, as I spent time going through this book I could see how a 4-6 year old child would be just fine with the length of the book, and given that it is completely interactive the whole way through their attention is not likely to sway. I think this book is just right not only for 3-6 year old, I believe this book would be a good learning tool to have in the classroom for kinders and preps, and would be an asset in school libraries. Learning can be fun, and learning without realising your learning is even better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Destiney Dickson

    Literature Requirement: Interactive Number of pages: 64 Age level: 5-6 years Genre: Fiction Copyright: Bayard Editions 2017 Book Format: hardcover This is an interactive book that allows children to be silly and creative while reading. The book begins by asking the question "Are you sure you want to play?" The next page says "Great! Put your finger on this dot and say OH!" The rest of the book encourages them reader to use their fingers and voice as the shapes are manipulated throughout the book. Spe Literature Requirement: Interactive Number of pages: 64 Age level: 5-6 years Genre: Fiction Copyright: Bayard Editions 2017 Book Format: hardcover This is an interactive book that allows children to be silly and creative while reading. The book begins by asking the question "Are you sure you want to play?" The next page says "Great! Put your finger on this dot and say OH!" The rest of the book encourages them reader to use their fingers and voice as the shapes are manipulated throughout the book. Specific instructions are given most of the time about where they should place their finger or what sound they should make. It even says how loud to say a sound. The book starts of really simple with just one blue circle. It then adds a few more. Farther into the book more shapes and colors are added and the book becomes more intense. The author seems to make the shapes comes alive and gives them emotions. On one page the blue and red circle argue and their colors mesh together in a chaotic way. The next page they make up and the two circles merge together. The dark color of that page gives a sense of peace. The end of the book has different sounds that it encourages children to try. On the last two pages there is an array of circles of different sizes and colors in curving/circular patterns. I really enjoyed this book. It allows children to use three different senses as well as their imaginations. I also liked how the book mentions, includes, or implies several emotions. Finally, I think that children who struggle with sitting quietly to read a book would greatly benefit from this one and ones like it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Lawson

    SAY ZOOP! is a fun, creative book. Each page brings a new adventure for the child. The dots, who we find our really "OH's," go on adventures, make friends, and invite the reader to join them. For example, "Animal Noise Time! Ready. Set. GO!" And, "Look, there's another friend! Say Waahoo! with your finger." Many of the scenes encourage the child to make sounds, or even invent their own sounds. My favorite page is the illustration of the red and blue robot dots: "Now in your best Robot Voice: OHOH SAY ZOOP! is a fun, creative book. Each page brings a new adventure for the child. The dots, who we find our really "OH's," go on adventures, make friends, and invite the reader to join them. For example, "Animal Noise Time! Ready. Set. GO!" And, "Look, there's another friend! Say Waahoo! with your finger." Many of the scenes encourage the child to make sounds, or even invent their own sounds. My favorite page is the illustration of the red and blue robot dots: "Now in your best Robot Voice: OHOHAHAHAHAHOHAH! The front and rear covers of SAY ZOOP! are heavy and shiny. The pages are somewhat thick, and are laminated. The inside pages are filled with a giant collage of dots. This book was originally published in France as, "Oh! Le Livre Qui Fait Des Sons." ("Oh! the Book that Makes Sounds.") It seems like the French title actually better matches the book contents, which is all about "OH'S." One idea: Wouldn't it be fun to have both the French and English versions on hand? Maybe for learning French? All in all, a fun, entertaining book. The artwork is simple but cute. The text is equally cute. I thought the best feature was the way the "OH's" encourage the child to get involved in tracing, touching, shouting, etc. Don't miss the pages where you take the "Oh's" for a walk, but "Be careful, there are lots of ups and downs." (Illustration shows the dots lined up, hiking over impossibly steep peaks.) Advance Review Copy courtesy of Chronicle Books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (FabBookReviews)

    Since reading and falling in love with Hervé Tullet's brilliant, storytime game-changer Press Here, I've been a HUGE fan/appreciator of interactive picture books- and of Tullet's work! While I would argue that Tullet's post-Press Here works haven't quite reached the epic storytime status or incredible effortlessness of his smash bestseller, his work is always cause for celebration, wonder and awe. Say Zoop!, Tullet's latest, is wonderfully fun, thoughtful, engaging interactive picture book that Since reading and falling in love with Hervé Tullet's brilliant, storytime game-changer Press Here, I've been a HUGE fan/appreciator of interactive picture books- and of Tullet's work! While I would argue that Tullet's post-Press Here works haven't quite reached the epic storytime status or incredible effortlessness of his smash bestseller, his work is always cause for celebration, wonder and awe. Say Zoop!, Tullet's latest, is wonderfully fun, thoughtful, engaging interactive picture book that begs for multiple reads and multiple explorations. Say Zoop! is a book of sounds, shapes, colours, movement- and like Tullet's previous work, relies on reader (and/or storyteller) whimsy and imagination. The picture book begins with the question: 'Hi! Are you really sure you want to play?' and a simple blue dot above; the reader then turns the page (after answering YES, I hope!) and is asked to put their finger on the blue dot and say 'OH!'. From there, readers are taken on part one of a merry, busy, journey with the blue dots: of saying everything from loud, huge OH's, to softer, smaller OH's, counting OH's, multiple OH's, and shivering OH's. Lest you think Tullet would let readers off with just deceptively simple OH's and blue dots, you would be mistaken, for we are then introduced to new friends including a red dot (AH!) and a yellow sun-like dot (WAHOO!), and more intricate word/sound/shape play. Busy, fun, hard-to-put-down and utterly delightful, Tullet absolutely has another picture book winner here with Say Zoop!. I received a copy of this title courtesy of Raincoast Books in exchange for an honest review. All opinions and comments are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Smith

    A blue dot starts out the story asking the reader to touch it and say OH! "Now put your finger on the little dot and say a little oh! Then put your finger on the big dot and say A HUGE OH!" Each action is met with praise. And each action tends to get slightly more involved and difficult. In time a red dot is introduced. A friend. When the reader touches this dot the word AH is to be said. As the two dots talk, the reader is to touch blue and say OH, then touch red and say AH. Eventually, a yellow A blue dot starts out the story asking the reader to touch it and say OH! "Now put your finger on the little dot and say a little oh! Then put your finger on the big dot and say A HUGE OH!" Each action is met with praise. And each action tends to get slightly more involved and difficult. In time a red dot is introduced. A friend. When the reader touches this dot the word AH is to be said. As the two dots talk, the reader is to touch blue and say OH, then touch red and say AH. Eventually, a yellow dot joins the group. When touching this dot the reader is to say WAAHOO! The three bounce, sing, act like cars, and more. My Thoughts What Concerned Me: The idea is sure to please lots of little tikes, but the sheer length of the book couldn't hold my attention, so I have to wonder how many children will be able to listen to the whole book. Most picture books are closer to 32 pages. This is a very long 64 pages. What I Liked Most: I really liked the concept, which felt very original and fun for kids. The author invites kids to carry out several tasks, such as whisper, shout, move a finger along a line of dots, make different sounds for three different dots, and more.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara Wordekemper

    Summary A blue dot, a red dot, and a yellow dot, each associated with an elemental sound—”Oh,” “Ah,” and “Waahoo” respectively multiply, change size in volume and position, hold conversations, bounce (“A little wilder now?”), combine, sing together, and at last invent “a whole new language” with successive page turns and taps. Offering terse directions along with plenty of praise and encouragement as he goes, Tullet presents not only invitations to whisper and shout on cue, but challenges to phys Summary A blue dot, a red dot, and a yellow dot, each associated with an elemental sound—”Oh,” “Ah,” and “Waahoo” respectively multiply, change size in volume and position, hold conversations, bounce (“A little wilder now?”), combine, sing together, and at last invent “a whole new language” with successive page turns and taps. Offering terse directions along with plenty of praise and encouragement as he goes, Tullet presents not only invitations to whisper and shout on cue, but challenges to physical and vocal dexterity alike, opportunities to act out and then practice dialing it down, even elemental musical instruction. In the climactic display, dots explode like fireworks, with loads of new colors that call for more made-up sounds. Activity Could have the children draw dots each in different colors and have them put words to it, having the class then make sentences out of those dots. Citation Tullet, H., & Franceschelli, C. (2017). Say zoop! San Francisco, CA: Handprint Books, an imprint of Chronicle Books LLC.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Following the fun success of interactive books such as Press Here and Mix It Up! comes the newest picture book by Herve Tullet. This time we follow simple blue and red dots and build some ‘Oh’ and ‘Ah’ sounds to match them. The patterns and sequences on each page are nicely mixed with imagination and variety to keep the reader guessing and practicing. When the yellow ‘Waahoo!’ joins the mix, we are all in for the creative musical mess that follows! As the book ends: “Doesn’t that make you want t Following the fun success of interactive books such as Press Here and Mix It Up! comes the newest picture book by Herve Tullet. This time we follow simple blue and red dots and build some ‘Oh’ and ‘Ah’ sounds to match them. The patterns and sequences on each page are nicely mixed with imagination and variety to keep the reader guessing and practicing. When the yellow ‘Waahoo!’ joins the mix, we are all in for the creative musical mess that follows! As the book ends: “Doesn’t that make you want to try mixing it up into some completely new sounds?” Tullet has another hit on his hands, and young readers have another vocal colorful adventure to explore! THOUGHTS: This series has also worked well for me with some autistic readers who crave tactile stories, especially with built in sound effects! A music teacher could also easily incorporate this book into a lesson about volume, pitch, patterns, or more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sue Winson

    I think this book has a very cleaver idea. 23-month old little-AJ giggled immediately and started imitating me when I did the big OH and little OH, and with different ascending or descending volume. It was fun, until I realize how long this book is. Little-AJ started losing interest half-way (although he did sit through the entire reading session). I think this book will make a great interactive group session with a bunch of active young kids (but above the age of those short-attention-span todd I think this book has a very cleaver idea. 23-month old little-AJ giggled immediately and started imitating me when I did the big OH and little OH, and with different ascending or descending volume. It was fun, until I realize how long this book is. Little-AJ started losing interest half-way (although he did sit through the entire reading session). I think this book will make a great interactive group session with a bunch of active young kids (but above the age of those short-attention-span toddlers). We get to do oh and ah and wahoo, and be as silly as we can. But such a book should not have that many pages (over 60!!), cause it makes the reader (poor mummy!) really exhausted by the end of the insane "reading" session. Overall, nice book, recommended for older kids beyond toddler's age, preferably group session with a bunch of crazily active children who love screaming. Blog review here: https://storypleasemummy.wordpress.co...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Relying on his usual primary colors and dots, the author/illustrator puts readers--and those shapes--through their paces as they move from page to page. The dots even start making sounds of "Oh!" as they climb, dive, and even shiver across the pages. This title is a bit more sophisticated than the earlier titles since it stretches readers with the inclusion of robots and even musical notes that bop all around. All I can say at this point is that this creator never seems to run out of ideas. Luck Relying on his usual primary colors and dots, the author/illustrator puts readers--and those shapes--through their paces as they move from page to page. The dots even start making sounds of "Oh!" as they climb, dive, and even shiver across the pages. This title is a bit more sophisticated than the earlier titles since it stretches readers with the inclusion of robots and even musical notes that bop all around. All I can say at this point is that this creator never seems to run out of ideas. Lucky young readers who learn early on that reading is not simply sitting silently and letting their eyes take in text and images. Sometimes it means interacting physically and often even interacting emotionally with the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I really loved this book when I first started reading it. It was on it's way to being my 2nd favorite of the series. I was considering buying 40 copies of it to make a class set for kids to have their own copy during storytime. But. It was just too darn long. It got a little tedius for me and I don't think there is any way to do this in a storytime unless you want it to be the only book you read. He could have stopped it halfway, made a book and used the 2nd half where the first dot meets it's f I really loved this book when I first started reading it. It was on it's way to being my 2nd favorite of the series. I was considering buying 40 copies of it to make a class set for kids to have their own copy during storytime. But. It was just too darn long. It got a little tedius for me and I don't think there is any way to do this in a storytime unless you want it to be the only book you read. He could have stopped it halfway, made a book and used the 2nd half where the first dot meets it's friends as a sequel. That being said, I loved how this one encourages the early lit practice "talk."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This book encourages kids to play with sound through the help of colorful dots. The different sizes, colors, and placements of the dots on the page help kids explore concepts like soft and loud, fast and slow, etc. I can see kids being drawn into the interactive nature of this book, and some of the prompts could result in some really imaginative responses! That said, I think this book stretches on too long for me to use it at storytime... I think I would need to leave out about a third of the pa This book encourages kids to play with sound through the help of colorful dots. The different sizes, colors, and placements of the dots on the page help kids explore concepts like soft and loud, fast and slow, etc. I can see kids being drawn into the interactive nature of this book, and some of the prompts could result in some really imaginative responses! That said, I think this book stretches on too long for me to use it at storytime... I think I would need to leave out about a third of the pages to have time to fit it in and keep young audiences from losing interest. Still, it's really clever and makes me want to check out some of Tullet's other books too!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Fun! Tullet's latest interactive book has simple shapes representing simple sounds. As they change sizes and positions, children are introduced to visual representation of sound, and dramatic reading. This would be a blast to read aloud to a group, especially if you could get the pictures on a big screen. Parts of this seem a little wobbly at the end (too long as a whole, maybe?), so not quite 5 stars. (Also, the French title was "The book that makes sounds," which I like a lot better. But Ameri Fun! Tullet's latest interactive book has simple shapes representing simple sounds. As they change sizes and positions, children are introduced to visual representation of sound, and dramatic reading. This would be a blast to read aloud to a group, especially if you could get the pictures on a big screen. Parts of this seem a little wobbly at the end (too long as a whole, maybe?), so not quite 5 stars. (Also, the French title was "The book that makes sounds," which I like a lot better. But American customers would probably say it's false advertising...)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    Say Zoop! is the fourth simple interactive concept book by Hervé Tullet that includes Press Here!, Mix It Up!, and Let’s Play!. Even in the age of flashy, noisy games for kids on iPads and iPhones, Tullet makes simple red, blue, and yellow dots and simple sounds together with simple suggestions for amping up the action fun and appealing to young readers as they create and follow the dot adventures. And don’t be surprised at just what dots can lead to as the ideas get progressively more complex.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    OK, so this isn’t really a board book, but it’s just right for little hands! The thick board covers open to sturdy pages and invite little ones to play. Just like his earlier books, Tullet invites children to interact with the pages, this time using noises as well as pressing dots. This will result in lots of silly noises, simple at first and then growing into complexity that is silly and hilarious. Just go with it! Share it with older kids too!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.