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The Plant Paradox Cookbook: 100 Delicious Recipes to Help You Lose Weight, Heal Your Gut, and Live Lectin-Free

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From renowned cardiac surgeon and acclaimed author Dr. Steven R. Gundry, the companion cookbook to New York Times bestselling The Plant Paradox, offering 100 easy-to-follow recipes and four-color photos.  In the New York Times bestseller The Plant Paradox, Dr. Steven Gundry introduced readers to the hidden toxins lurking in seemingly healthy foods like tomatoes, zucchini, From renowned cardiac surgeon and acclaimed author Dr. Steven R. Gundry, the companion cookbook to New York Times bestselling The Plant Paradox, offering 100 easy-to-follow recipes and four-color photos.  In the New York Times bestseller The Plant Paradox, Dr. Steven Gundry introduced readers to the hidden toxins lurking in seemingly healthy foods like tomatoes, zucchini, quinoa, and brown rice: a class of plant-based proteins called lectins. Many people are familiar with one of the most predominant lectins—a substance called gluten, which is found in wheat and other grains. But while cutting out the bread and going gluten-free is relatively straightforward, going lectin-free is no small task.Now, in The Plant Paradox Cookbook, Dr. Gundry breaks down lectin-free eating step by step and shares one hundred of his favorite healthy recipes. Dr. Gundry will offer an overview of his Plant Paradox program and show readers how to overhaul their pantries and shopping lists to make delicious, simple, seasonal, lectin-free meals. He’ll also share his hacks for making high-lectin foods safe to eat, including methods like pressure-cooking grains and peeling and deseeding tomatoes.With a quick-start program designed to boost weight loss and recipes for smoothies, breakfasts, main meals, snacks, and desserts, The Plant Paradox Cookbook will show readers of The Plant Paradox—and more—how delicious it can be to eat lectin-free.


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From renowned cardiac surgeon and acclaimed author Dr. Steven R. Gundry, the companion cookbook to New York Times bestselling The Plant Paradox, offering 100 easy-to-follow recipes and four-color photos.  In the New York Times bestseller The Plant Paradox, Dr. Steven Gundry introduced readers to the hidden toxins lurking in seemingly healthy foods like tomatoes, zucchini, From renowned cardiac surgeon and acclaimed author Dr. Steven R. Gundry, the companion cookbook to New York Times bestselling The Plant Paradox, offering 100 easy-to-follow recipes and four-color photos.  In the New York Times bestseller The Plant Paradox, Dr. Steven Gundry introduced readers to the hidden toxins lurking in seemingly healthy foods like tomatoes, zucchini, quinoa, and brown rice: a class of plant-based proteins called lectins. Many people are familiar with one of the most predominant lectins—a substance called gluten, which is found in wheat and other grains. But while cutting out the bread and going gluten-free is relatively straightforward, going lectin-free is no small task.Now, in The Plant Paradox Cookbook, Dr. Gundry breaks down lectin-free eating step by step and shares one hundred of his favorite healthy recipes. Dr. Gundry will offer an overview of his Plant Paradox program and show readers how to overhaul their pantries and shopping lists to make delicious, simple, seasonal, lectin-free meals. He’ll also share his hacks for making high-lectin foods safe to eat, including methods like pressure-cooking grains and peeling and deseeding tomatoes.With a quick-start program designed to boost weight loss and recipes for smoothies, breakfasts, main meals, snacks, and desserts, The Plant Paradox Cookbook will show readers of The Plant Paradox—and more—how delicious it can be to eat lectin-free.

30 review for The Plant Paradox Cookbook: 100 Delicious Recipes to Help You Lose Weight, Heal Your Gut, and Live Lectin-Free

  1. 4 out of 5

    William Lawrence

    More tomatoes, zucchini, quinoa, and brown rice for me, I guess! This is a cookbook that will send you straight to the doctor's office with a host of problems. I can't believe a medical doctor with a Yale degree can actually go out there and say these things and still sleep at night. Despite being professionally packaged by a big publisher, this book is simply a cheap TV infomercial in print. A simple Google search reveals all the refutations and links to real studies. Gundry's claims were a con More tomatoes, zucchini, quinoa, and brown rice for me, I guess! This is a cookbook that will send you straight to the doctor's office with a host of problems. I can't believe a medical doctor with a Yale degree can actually go out there and say these things and still sleep at night. Despite being professionally packaged by a big publisher, this book is simply a cheap TV infomercial in print. A simple Google search reveals all the refutations and links to real studies. Gundry's claims were a conference presentation, not a peer reviewed study published in a journal. Don't buy these infomercial claims. To dismiss fast food, fatty meats, and sugars, and blame vegetables is outrageous and Harper Collins should be ashamed of themselves for publishing this junk science collection of fictional conspiracy theories. Just go to your public library and look up the real studies in the databases that advocate for a plant based diet. You won't find any of Gundry's claims in the scholarly journals and studies, actually you won't anything by Gundry at all. What a sad attempt to rake in profit, as if medical doctors in America don't make enough cash.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauricia Matuska

    Read this book based on a recommendation by someone who knew my family deals with different autoimmune disorders (Asperger’s, asthma, pre-diabetes, and Lupus). All three of us experienced reduced symptoms and improved health within two months. My son missed 1/4 the number of school days due to asthma, and my rheumatologist cut my Lupus medication in half and decreased my number of maintenance appointments to two per year. Give it a try... if nothing else, you can go back to your old way of eatin Read this book based on a recommendation by someone who knew my family deals with different autoimmune disorders (Asperger’s, asthma, pre-diabetes, and Lupus). All three of us experienced reduced symptoms and improved health within two months. My son missed 1/4 the number of school days due to asthma, and my rheumatologist cut my Lupus medication in half and decreased my number of maintenance appointments to two per year. Give it a try... if nothing else, you can go back to your old way of eating in three to six months.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I read the Kindle version. The first 30% of the book is a summary of The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain. It was helpful to review the concepts. The rest of the book is devoted to the recipes. I haven't tried any of them yet, but some look good. The fact of the matter is that going on this diet plan will take getting used to for just about anyone. Even the author mentions that is takes 6 weeks (I think that's right) to settle into the new die I read the Kindle version. The first 30% of the book is a summary of The Plant Paradox: The Hidden Dangers in "Healthy" Foods That Cause Disease and Weight Gain. It was helpful to review the concepts. The rest of the book is devoted to the recipes. I haven't tried any of them yet, but some look good. The fact of the matter is that going on this diet plan will take getting used to for just about anyone. Even the author mentions that is takes 6 weeks (I think that's right) to settle into the new diet and stop craving the old unhealthy foods. I don't think I could do the diet plan cold turkey. I'd need to gradually replace foods and experiment with the new foods suggested (for those I don't already eat). I'd also need some time to find sources for some of the new foods, because I'm used to getting most everything I need from a supermarket 5 minutes away. I'd rather not have to order food online if I can avoid it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Call me still searching... I’d already determined that many of my health issues were related to lectin intolerance, especially my food sensitivities, which almost completely relate to foods containing lectins (as hubby says, it’s fun at our house). When you’re like me, you have to ignore traditional (limiting) medicine & look outside the box. While I relate to Gundry’s premise on lectins (finally, a reasonable answer!), I’m even more limited by the ingredients used in the recipes — many of which Call me still searching... I’d already determined that many of my health issues were related to lectin intolerance, especially my food sensitivities, which almost completely relate to foods containing lectins (as hubby says, it’s fun at our house). When you’re like me, you have to ignore traditional (limiting) medicine & look outside the box. While I relate to Gundry’s premise on lectins (finally, a reasonable answer!), I’m even more limited by the ingredients used in the recipes — many of which I cannot use. Like coconut, mushroom, avocado, almond... I’m allergic to all of them & then some. No replacements really offered or suggested for these ingredients. (When will people realize that coconut is not hypoallergenic?!) But I did get more ideas for further limiting my lectin intake, so that’s something. However, going full vegan/vegetarian with my diet, given all my allergies to vegetables, would be untenable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Geoeng51

    Read this book on a lark, really. It seemed interesting but about a topic of which I was mostly ignorant. It was a real eye-opener for me - started me down the path (which I have now followed for about 6 months, and after reading many other related books and internet articles) of a very low sugar, low carb, moderate (to low) protein, high-fat eating regimen. Dr Gundry's contribution to the literature is integrating knowledge of lectins and their impact on the gastrointestinal system (and gut "bu Read this book on a lark, really. It seemed interesting but about a topic of which I was mostly ignorant. It was a real eye-opener for me - started me down the path (which I have now followed for about 6 months, and after reading many other related books and internet articles) of a very low sugar, low carb, moderate (to low) protein, high-fat eating regimen. Dr Gundry's contribution to the literature is integrating knowledge of lectins and their impact on the gastrointestinal system (and gut "bugs"). He outlines numerous health benefits, several of which I have experienced in my own life. I highly recommend this book to those who are looking for real information on physical health.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jorgina

    confessions of a foodie After reading sections of his plant paradox book, and viewing numerous presentation videos by Dr gundry, I went right to the cookbook to see what type of meal plans aligned with his philosophy. But before I discuss whether or not that book fulfilled the need, I want to reflect back when I looked at becoming a vegetarian. Because that type of lifestyle was not something I grew up with and it meant that I had to shift my mindset towards creating menus and cooking for my famil confessions of a foodie After reading sections of his plant paradox book, and viewing numerous presentation videos by Dr gundry, I went right to the cookbook to see what type of meal plans aligned with his philosophy. But before I discuss whether or not that book fulfilled the need, I want to reflect back when I looked at becoming a vegetarian. Because that type of lifestyle was not something I grew up with and it meant that I had to shift my mindset towards creating menus and cooking for my family, I, of course, went to the library and brought home vegetarian cooking books. And other such literature. For a group of people who are very adamant against eating meat for either moral reasons, health reasons, or consciousness, I'm surprised that Vegetarian recipes were all focused on making grains starches and other vegetables mimic the texture, flavor, or taste of meat. Why did they not just eat the vegetables without trying to disguise them? An interesting parallel happened in the paradox cookbook. Dr gundry talks about lectins which are in a lot of our foods and of course in higher concentrations than in others. He suggests not eating any foods that contain lectins as they cause numerous health problems such as arthritis, digestion problems, aches and pains, bloating, and so forth. Those foods include the tomato family; eggplant, and all peppers hot or bell. he also discourages many types of nuts, and all grains including pseudo grains such as quinoa and the reduction of all sugars whether they're natural or from the sugar cane. And that includes almost all fruits. Legumes we're especially evil but not more than tomatoes. The parallel I found with the vegetarian cookbooks and in Dr. Gundry's cookbook is that almost all of the vegetables and things you could eat such as some grains were being transformed into mimicking not meat but bread, which he adamantly advises to refrain from eating. Many of the recipes included legumes, tomatoes, but in as in most of them they were still trying to mimic things that he said not to eat. Did he not write the recipes? Was somebody else in charge of that section of the book? I looked into another diet program years ago just because I'm always curious of the results and I had good results from that diet. But again in the end of the book which discouraged eating a lot of grains and breads, many of the recipes were baking bread. The author did admit that he did not gather the recipes and they were submitted by his close friends. So again I ask, did Dr gundry have somebody else do the recipes? So, my take away from many of the health diets, cookbooks, etc., is thus: eat the bread, eat some meat, eat those grains & nuts, those fruits and especially those vegetables. get some exercise drink water and do things in moderation. For the last 100 years every health regimen always comes down to these things to wit eat well, exercise moderately, sleep well and drink water. So as a confession, I love food and have a hard time doing things in moderation. So truly my discipline needs to be moderation not another health diet program.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Claire Sheats

    This book was very thought-provoking. It's interesting to consider how foods effect our bodies, and I really enjoyed exploring the science here. I did feel Dr. Gundry was too heavy-handed with evolution being the main contributor for why lectins exist, but then I am not an evolutionist 😊. The practical applications he gives for his approach to a lectin-free life are very doable. He even provides an exhaustive list of kitchen essentials (foods and tools!) to build around - love it! I haven't read This book was very thought-provoking. It's interesting to consider how foods effect our bodies, and I really enjoyed exploring the science here. I did feel Dr. Gundry was too heavy-handed with evolution being the main contributor for why lectins exist, but then I am not an evolutionist 😊. The practical applications he gives for his approach to a lectin-free life are very doable. He even provides an exhaustive list of kitchen essentials (foods and tools!) to build around - love it! I haven't read The Plant Paradox, which evidently goes into much greater detail, but this cookbook is extremely informative and I believe readers will walk away with an appropriate understanding of the topic.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Miksa

    Very well explained. Nice photos to compliment the lectin-free recipes. Most seem very easy and good alternatives to the lectin food we are initially obsessed/crazed for. However, the only inconvenience is getting used to all the new ingredients and how to cook them. Overall, great, healthy and adaptable recipe book to compliment the "Plant Paradox" book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Page

    I'm not done with the book, but I am also reading the associated book, The Plant Paradox, and am mostly through it. To those arguing against the book, if you will take the time to read the original book and absorb the information, you should understand that it makes complete sense; though I acknowledge that if you are not having continual gut issues, there is very little reason for you to give the book any attention whatsoever. However, Dr. Gundry is quite clear with his explanations and provide I'm not done with the book, but I am also reading the associated book, The Plant Paradox, and am mostly through it. To those arguing against the book, if you will take the time to read the original book and absorb the information, you should understand that it makes complete sense; though I acknowledge that if you are not having continual gut issues, there is very little reason for you to give the book any attention whatsoever. However, Dr. Gundry is quite clear with his explanations and provides a lot of evidence for his assertions. He is not saying everyone should give up every food with lectins. In fact, this book is not for everyone. Most people will benefit from the knowledge in this book, but the ones who will get the most out of it are ones who either struggle with one or more chronic illnesses or have tried every other diet and still struggled with weight issues. The fact of the matter is that most of us are so ingrained on our "normal" eating habits, that we cannot stomach such a drastic change in diet for a marginal change in health, but to those with serious health issues that conventional medicine only ignores or makes worse, this book is a Godsend. My wife and I have experimented with the foods on his okay list and his "say no" list and we have found a correlation with our energy levels and well-being. It gives us the power of understanding which we can leverage to modulate our diet to get the effects we need. I've known instinctually/experientially about the effects of some of these foods for years (particularly pepper and tomato skins), and had already found some of his answers on my own, but this book gives a more complete picture of what I sketched out haphazardly. The six-week first phase Gundry suggests is not for people to get used to the diet necessarily, but for a suffering person to get the most dramatic and immediate results, so that he or she can clearly see the principles in operation and get relief. Then after that 6 weeks, you can start adding back some of your favorites to see what causes issues. Some things, some of us will clearly never give up. And you don't have to use his recipes, but they are a decent inspiration--you can take his principles and adjust some of your favorites to reduce your lectin load. For instance, if you love tomatoes, you don't have to abstain--simply make sure you peel and seed them from now on if they cause you issues. If you love beans, just be sure to prepare them properly. Having said all of that, some of these recipes seem to need work or more (any?) time in the test kitchen. The ginger brownie bites to me tasted like a mix between compost and vomit, which surprised me, because I like all of the ingredients in the recipe--it was definitely a negative sum of all of its parts. But...once you go completely without sugar for a while, even as unenjoyable as these crumbly garden soil sandcastle-like "brownie bites" still are, they do bring a slight amount of enjoyment/comfort when you're tweaking. I give them a 2 out of 10. The sweet potato spaghetti and meatballs was a disaster for me, and I'm not exactly a beginner in the kitchen. From the picture, I was pretty intrigued and expected something at least edible. On closer inspection, I had several issues with the recipe, but decided to make it just as instructed to give it a chance. I give it a 1 out of 10. SO bad. It was a tragic waste of the wonderful pesto recipe included in the book. If I had made any of the changes my instincts told me to, it may have been edible. On the opposite end of the spectrum, recipes such as the cauliflower fritters (9 out of 10) and the cassava tortillas (7 out of 10) are amazing. The cassava tortillas are almost a perfect replacement for wheat flour tortillas, but they are strange in that they are very fragile during pressing and cooking, but are super-tough once done and a lot harder to bite into--still, they are very worth the effort. Also satisfactory and satisfying were the beef and mushroom stew (6+ out of 10) and the eggroll in a bowl (7 out of 10). I look forward to many of the other recipes and will edit this review with a concise summary once we get most or all of the book under our belt. I'm only giving it 3 out of 5 based on how bad those two recipes were since this IS a cookbook after all, but I recognize it's not fair not having tried all of the recipes and will update that rating appropriately. I rate the original book much higher.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cris

    I picked this book up because I'm always looking for new vegetable-focused recipes. I know nothing about the "Plant Paradox". Perhaps the author does a better job of explaining and arguing his thesis in his book The Plant Paradox. In here, however, he sound like a deluded zealot. A number of the statements Gundry makes are ridiculous. (For example, he asserts--repeatedly--that eating any fruit is the same as eating candy bars. While fruit does contain a kind of sugar (fructose) and shouldn't be d I picked this book up because I'm always looking for new vegetable-focused recipes. I know nothing about the "Plant Paradox". Perhaps the author does a better job of explaining and arguing his thesis in his book The Plant Paradox. In here, however, he sound like a deluded zealot. A number of the statements Gundry makes are ridiculous. (For example, he asserts--repeatedly--that eating any fruit is the same as eating candy bars. While fruit does contain a kind of sugar (fructose) and shouldn't be discounted when considering your diet, I can't imagine a serving of fruit having the same number of calories, fat, sodium and other negative ingredients a candy bar has.) I also found his section on intermittent fasting off-putting. I've read conflicting studies about the health benefits of intermittent fasting, particularly for women. (Although to be fair, it's unlikely to be actively harmful to most people.) Still, Gundry's recommendation that readers should adopt a seasonal intermittent fasting schedule such as his that's "not only possible, it's sustainable" is unrealistic for most people. His recommendation? Only eating between 6:00 pm and 8:00 pm each day from January to May. Still, I persevered to the recipes. Out of the '100 delicious recipes' I selected less than 10 to try. Some of that was based on personal taste, but a lot of the recipes aren't stand-alone. For example, in order to make the 'pizza with cauliflower crust' you actually need 1-2 other recipes. And some of the recipes are so simple that using a recipe seems like overkill--such as the multiple omelet recipes. Overall, I'm not impressed. Some of the foundation of his recommendations make sense to me--green leafy vegetables are good for you, choose poultry, eggs and meat that is antibiotic and hormone-free, etc. But a lot of his conclusions seem to have no basis, and considering how radical many of his recommendations are (avoid dairy, fruit, most vegetables, all grains except soghrum and millet) his arguments need more support.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Smith

    Fascinating. The diet recommended by the Plant Paradox is such a dramatic change from what I normally eat that I’d be very frustrated and hungry without these recipes. Love the way he adds modifications for vegans and vegetarians. The spices are not always in my cabinet, but they are worth getting (in small quantities.) The flavors and smells they add to the dishes is tantalizing. Unlike most cookbooks, I want to try almost every recipe. So far I’ve tried four. Originally I was fascinated by the Fascinating. The diet recommended by the Plant Paradox is such a dramatic change from what I normally eat that I’d be very frustrated and hungry without these recipes. Love the way he adds modifications for vegans and vegetarians. The spices are not always in my cabinet, but they are worth getting (in small quantities.) The flavors and smells they add to the dishes is tantalizing. Unlike most cookbooks, I want to try almost every recipe. So far I’ve tried four. Originally I was fascinated by the doctor’s do not eat list. I felt better, had more energy when I stopped eating peanuts and cashews immediately.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Felker

    This book condenses into the first 50 pages all the science from the 400 page companion book. The formatting of the lists in this cookbook lend to photocopying for personal use/reference better than than main book. A great overview with really interesting recipes that are all very adaptable to different diet lifestyles- one of the first resources I’ve seen that leave a lot of possibility for gluten free vegetarians.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julienne

    I made the Chicken Lime Tortilla Soup and it was delicious. I'm excited to try some of the other recipes. The information was interesting and there were some data that I've never heard before. Since I mostly eat a paleo diet this cookbook isn't too far-fetched for me to get on board with and look forward to seeing if a few tweaks will make a difference on my stomach issues.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Selman

    Easy read and informative Dr. Gundry outlines why lectins are harmful in plain terms easy enough for anyone to understand. He walks you through each stage of eating and then provides recipes. The book is short and to the point -- definitely worth picking up.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sherry R.N.N.P.

    Besides the wonderful recipes, Dr. Gundry did a great job of reviewing the principals of eating a low lectin diet. I highly recommend it. It changed my life and health.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lin

    Whether I commit to this program or not,m the recipes are healthy and interesting.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary Carol

    I liked this book. It has wonderful good for you recipes that follow Dr. Gundry's diet. Lots of pictures and a food scenario to navigate any social or home situation.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura McGaffey

    Written by an M.D. who gives very detailed information about this way of eating. Recipes are delicious and well written.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I read The Plant Paradox Cookbook: 100 Delicious Recipes to Help You Lose Weight, Heal Your Gut, and Live Lectin-Free at the same time I started reading Medical Medium Liver Rescue: Answers to Eczema, Psoriasis, Diabetes, Strep, Acne, Gout, Bloating, Gallstones, Adrenal Stress, Fatigue, Fatty Liver, Weight Issues, SIBO & Autoimmune Disease. I haven't finished William's book yet, but I'm already amazed at how these two disagree. Two items off the top of my head: Gundry advises to avoid fruit whil I read The Plant Paradox Cookbook: 100 Delicious Recipes to Help You Lose Weight, Heal Your Gut, and Live Lectin-Free at the same time I started reading Medical Medium Liver Rescue: Answers to Eczema, Psoriasis, Diabetes, Strep, Acne, Gout, Bloating, Gallstones, Adrenal Stress, Fatigue, Fatty Liver, Weight Issues, SIBO & Autoimmune Disease. I haven't finished William's book yet, but I'm already amazed at how these two disagree. Two items off the top of my head: Gundry advises to avoid fruit while Williams touts it as a requirement for the liver; Gundry is enthusiastic about egg yolks (eat up to four a day!) while Williams sees them as feeding the viral explosion that is ravaging our bodies. I think Williams (since I'm reviewing his book here) is guilty of taking bits of information and extrapolating to compose a seemingly logical way of eating that will save you from health problems. But I just don't believe it. Especially since I did a tiny amount of research on the web just to check it out. It's tempting to sign on to a program such as either of these, especially if you're feeling desperate about a health issue. But, SCIENCE, people! Be sure and do some research on dubious claims before you go down an expensive and time-consuming road that may leave you even more discouraged than you already are. (I don't think there's anything wrong with the recipes in this book in terms of health. In fact, some of them look pretty good.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adrienna

    I was astonished that the Doctor was a SDA, and has been pro-vegetarian/vegan already for 16 years. I am familiar with the SDA diet regime, except they do eat starches and/or soy products that are not recommended in this diet. I finished looking thru the book in one sitting. I was amazed at so many recipes that I wanted to try, to where the photocopying stopped after seeing too much to copy, so will just purchase a copy. Before purchase, I will try/attempt some recipes before returning the loan I was astonished that the Doctor was a SDA, and has been pro-vegetarian/vegan already for 16 years. I am familiar with the SDA diet regime, except they do eat starches and/or soy products that are not recommended in this diet. I finished looking thru the book in one sitting. I was amazed at so many recipes that I wanted to try, to where the photocopying stopped after seeing too much to copy, so will just purchase a copy. Before purchase, I will try/attempt some recipes before returning the loan back to the library too. This diet is restricted to three phases, but will test these foods on the no list, to see if gas is caused or bloating, so far this is a yes like peanuts, green beans, etc. Overall, I am not sure if I agree with removing all beans and lentils since vegan/vegetarian lifestyle isn't easy...use black beans or lentils to make dishes like tacos, and other cuisines to satisfy hunger and protein. Disclaimer: This is a loaned copy from the library and giving my honest opinion of the book. I am also doing it for research purposes since I am frustrated with weight gain, struggles with digestive system for a number of years, and seeing which foods cause the inflammation.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    Not sure if I would be able to stick to the regiment of this book. There were some thought provoking insights that I'll be looking into further. The recipes looks great and I like the way the author presented his theory. While he tries to present things to help you live a healthy lifestyle, I think sometimes the cost around following this lifestyle could be a challenge for people on a fix and budgeted lifestyle.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Just being to digest the whole idea of being lectin free. Changed diet over the years to be a mostly carb free vegetarian, but now thinking about eliminating those lectins, to stop eating quinoa and peas and beans and squashes...wow...reducing even more what I can eat is at the moment, daunting. Some of the recipes look doable for me, others too many ingredients and steps.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Mixed feelings. Gundry makes it sound interesting, but most 'clean eating' books do the same thing. The food list is fairly restrictive and a number of the foods are obscure specialty items. The recipes are time consuming. Eating not just organic, but grass-fed, or pasture raised is expensive. And of course he sells stuff on his website.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kori

    This is the Devil’s cookbook! I was looking for some healthy new recipes, but there is NO way I’m spending days tracking down obscure ingredients and hours grinding nuts into quiche crust. This might be fine for some people, but it is not for me!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dennis L Kerley III

    Great next step We have worked to stay on the Paleo diet for several years, but my arthritis is still a problem. This cookbook is helping me take the next step in healing my immune system! Thank you

  26. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    I love every recipe! I have been following the Plant Paradox for 4 months. I was getting bored. This cookbook has given me many more options to my usual menu.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Terry Sloan

    Relevant Lots of good information regarding clean eating. I think this would be difficult for vegetarians and vegans. Even the veggies are limited.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Some good vegan recipes here.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    I will continue trying some of the recipes in this book to find favorites. Some I'm not interested in because I don't eat what they are made of. Trying to eat lectin-free is a continuing journey!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Veronica Smyth

    Pictures not very inspiring and could use more

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