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Clap When You Land

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Author: Elizabeth Acevedo

Published: May 5th 2020 by Hot Key Books

Format: Paperback , 417 pages

Isbn: 9781471409127

Language: English


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Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people... In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash. S Camino Rios lives for the summers when her father visits her in the Dominican Republic. But this time, on the day when his plane is supposed to land, Camino arrives at the airport to see crowds of crying people... In New York City, Yahaira Rios is called to the principal's office, where her mother is waiting to tell her that her father, her hero, has died in a plane crash. Separated by distance - and Papi's secrets - the two girls are forced to face a new reality in which their father is dead and their lives are forever altered. And then, when it seems like they've lost everything of their father, they learn of each other. Papi's death uncovers all the painful truths he kept hidden, and the love he divided across an ocean. And now, Camino and Yahaira are both left to grapple with what this new sister means to them, and what it will now take to keep their dreams alive. In a dual narrative novel in verse that brims with both grief and love, award-winning and bestselling author Elizabeth Acevedo writes about the devastation of loss, the difficulty of forgiveness, and the bittersweet bonds that shape our lives.

30 review for Clap When You Land

  1. 4 out of 5

    chai ♡

    ✧ find this review & others on my blog ✧ It is hard to describe the space that yawned open in the life of Camino Rios and Yahaira Rios after their father died in a flight crash. It is harder still to describe the truths he left behind, cutting swift and deep, like a knife: Camino and Yahaira are sisters who, for sixteen years, hadn’t known of each other’s existence. Their world too had tipped, and fallen, and the secrets their father held aloft over their heads are seized by gravity. Now it w ✧ find this review & others on my blog ✧ It is hard to describe the space that yawned open in the life of Camino Rios and Yahaira Rios after their father died in a flight crash. It is harder still to describe the truths he left behind, cutting swift and deep, like a knife: Camino and Yahaira are sisters who, for sixteen years, hadn’t known of each other’s existence. Their world too had tipped, and fallen, and the secrets their father held aloft over their heads are seized by gravity. Now it was just the two of them, and the slow, outgoing tide of aftermath. Camino and Yahaira are both desperately pawing for the truth of their father as they might paw at beach sand in hopes of finding a shell, hunting in the rubble of his life for answers, and trying to find their way to each other across the Rubicon that divided their two worlds. On the screen, beyond where she can see, I trace her chin with my finger. & for the first time I don’t just feel loss. I don’t feel just a big gaping hole at everything my father’s absence has swallowed. Look at what it’s spit out & offered. Look at who it’s given me. There’s no doubt that Acevedo is one of the brightest literary talents around. Tender, patient and raw as a wound, “Clap When You Land” burrows deep under its reader's skin while at the same time nudging them into inhabiting the perspective of its characters. The author possesses a unique musicality for language—her writing buoys and soothes at once, and I wanted nothing more than to breathe the words in until they ached inside my chest, to nestle into the story’s steady warmth like a well-worn sweater. But for all the novel’s poetry and lyricism, Acevedo never forgets to tell a gripping tale. There’s a chafed, bruised feeling to this book, and something in me splintered while reading it. “Clap When You Land” is a novel that explores the wrenching depths of what it feels like to lose something and be unable to move on, not only a literal person, but also a way of life. This is Cami and Yaya’s story of weary grief and visceral longing—the novel alternating between their voices—but you are in there too, and that makes their loss your loss, the ache your ache, the anger you anger, and the secrets their father had sealed away inside him like a box with another box inside it and another inside something you too must process and come to terms with yourself. All of it burgeoning within you with every turn of the page, welling up like tears. And that owes in huge part to the author’s deft, tender characterizations, and the way she artfully infuses her novel with great empathy—offering the reader so many questions, but not giving any direct or easy answers. Yaya and Cami’s father had been the life of their small universe, and without him their world felt huge and empty, like a shipwreck hull. They loved him, and they mourned him, but they also wondered if they could ever really forgive him. In the fraying cobwebs of their memories, the side of their father that they saw was polished to such a high gloss of perfection—the loving, attentive father—but it is now vying with this newly revealed side of him—the terrible husband, the selfish man—and the two are clashing like swords. Does one side cancel out the other? Will Cami and Yaya ever be able to think of him and see only the word “father” and not the things he left behind? This is the “gift and curse” both Yahaira and Camino are wrestling with throughout the story. Camino and Yahaira didn’t have to articulate the curious shape of their grief because they could see it mirrored in each other’s eyes. Cami, on the one hand, is grateful, but she can’t help but think a little bit secretly—and resentfully—in her heart that life for Yahaira has been as easy as pulling strings: Yahaira, after all, got to live with their father nine months a year in their New York apartment, while Cami is the one he left behind, fighting off the unwanted advances of an older neighbor who refused to take no for an answer. Yahaira, on the other hand, can see the sadness in Cami’s anger, the guardedness of grief, and she’s grappling with her own relationship to her mother, both of them filled with a sadness that they could not articulate without fracturing their relationship. As for other thematic notes, the novel probes achingly at the question of identity, what it means to grow up in a world you felt only halfway inside of, and to question your claim to your parents’ roots when you’ve never set foot in their world. The novel cracks open all that wordless agony like an egg and leaks out the words: “Can you be from a place you have never been? You can find the island stamped all over me, but what would the island find if I was there? Can you claim a home that does not know you, much less claim you as its own?” The author also skillfully articulates how different tragedies are portrayed in the media, especially the ones that touch a marginalized community, and how those stories tend to be quickly robbed of their sharp edges, easily dismissed even while those communities are still wrestling with the loss. That said, Acevedo tempers the sting of that harsh reality with the beauty of hope in a way that is deeply affecting. Yahaira and Camino’s feelings are twins, even if they are not, and the ravine between them gets smaller enough to close with every page. There’s also so much sapphic tenderness nestled into this story: Yahaira and Dre's relationship filled me with so much warmth. I tell her that when we land some people on the plane might clap. She turns to me with an eyebrow raised. I imagine it’s kind of giving thanks. Of all the ways it could end it ends not with us in the sky or the water, but together on solid earth safely grounded. So much about this novel tugged at my heartstrings, and I highly recommend you pick it up! ☆ ko-fi ★ blog ☆ twitter ★ tumblr ☆

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    A queen offers her hand to be kissed, & can form it into a fist while smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author's obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about. Tragedies happen all the time. Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics-- terrorism, school shootings, for example --but some are left to be grieved only by thos A queen offers her hand to be kissed, & can form it into a fist while smiling the whole damn time. Perhaps what I love most about Clap When You Land, besides the author's obvious talent for writing moving free verse, is that it brings attention to something that so many of us forgot about or never heard about. Tragedies happen all the time. Some are noticed, when they are newsworthy and drenched in politics-- terrorism, school shootings, for example --but some are left to be grieved only by those directly affected. The rest of the world goes on as normal, not seeing the pain inflicted on the community in question. In November 2001, flight AA587 crashed to the ground on its way to Santo Domingo, killing 265 people on a flight where 90% of the passengers were Dominican or of Dominican descent. Noting that it was not another terrorist attack, the media largely ignored it, but it was a terrible blow to the New York Dominican community. Clap When You Land is the story of two girls - Camino and Yahaira - one in the Dominican Republic and one in New York City. They have never met, never spoken, never known about each other's existence, but when their father is killed in a plane crash on his way to visit Camino, they find each other in the midst of their grief. Both girls have their own struggles, but Camino is especially threatened without her father to protect her. Now the local pimp, a man called El Cero, is hanging around, following her. All she wants is to escape, study premed, have a chance at something better. Then along comes Yahaira and turns her life upside down, changes everything she thought she knew about her father. So he created a theater of his life & got lost in all the different roles he had to play. This is another part of the book and I thought it was done really well. Part of the girls' discovery of each other is also the discovery that maybe their father wasn't quite the man they thought he was. That he was more complex, had many flaws. That even though he was a good father, he might not have been a good husband. In this, the book is something of a bildungsroman. Both girls are matured by the intensity of the loss and the discoveries made after. It is a beautiful story that finds a lot of warmth and hope in the darkness of loss. My only complaint is that Camino and Yahaira's voices were a little too similar. I found it especially hard to distinguish the two in the beginning and had to look for other markers to remember whose chapters we were on. But it's a small complaint. Highly recommended for those who enjoyed The Poet X and other novels in verse. Facebook | Instagram

  3. 5 out of 5

    Zoë

    Elizabeth Acevedo books are such a joy to read, and this was no exception! Though it dealt largely with grief following a tragedy, the audiobook felt like such a comfort. I loved the two narrators (both the characters and the actual audiobook narrators) and how their stories were mirror images but also very personal. Highly recommend!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Pham

    Acevedo writes poetically and passionately like always, and her audiobooks are always great. The book explores themes of grief, family, and cultural differences that would be great for her young adult audience to read. Personally, I would have enjoyed a deeper exploration of grief and the way both girls grapple with the complexities of their family stories. There’s a lot to tap into there, but their voices were quite similar to the point where it became difficult sometimes to remember who was spe Acevedo writes poetically and passionately like always, and her audiobooks are always great. The book explores themes of grief, family, and cultural differences that would be great for her young adult audience to read. Personally, I would have enjoyed a deeper exploration of grief and the way both girls grapple with the complexities of their family stories. There’s a lot to tap into there, but their voices were quite similar to the point where it became difficult sometimes to remember who was speaking. This made more sense when Acevedo reveals in her author’s note that she hadn’t made the decision to split into two POVs until later on, so the two protagonists didn’t feel distinctive enough. The sister relationship also has a lot of potential to be explored more deeply, but we barely got to see them spend much time interacting with each other and coming to terms with one another. I wish more time had been devoted to the relationship between the two protagonists rather than spending 2/3 of the book reading a repetition of their same reactions. Still a very solid YA book and would recommend to teens.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    Every time I read an Elizabeth Acevedo book, I think that it can't possibly top her previous work, but every time I am so, so wrong. This is my favorite of Acevedo's works yet. I very rarely cry while listening to audiobooks, but this one had me sobbing while washing dishing and I just loved it so fucking much. I recommend this book to absolutely EVERYONE. TW: death of a parent, plane crashes, stalking, sexual assault

  6. 4 out of 5

    Warda

    4.5 🌟 Elizabeth Acevedo and her words are something else. Something special that is needed and I’m so grateful that it’s out there. In book form no less as well. This story was so moving and heartfelt, addled with grief, loss and having your world altered due to death and family secrets. All of this came together in verse. I can’t praise Acevedo enough for the way she puts words together. I love that there’s something about it that makes you pause and reflect. I love the Spanish language that is 4.5 🌟 Elizabeth Acevedo and her words are something else. Something special that is needed and I’m so grateful that it’s out there. In book form no less as well. This story was so moving and heartfelt, addled with grief, loss and having your world altered due to death and family secrets. All of this came together in verse. I can’t praise Acevedo enough for the way she puts words together. I love that there’s something about it that makes you pause and reflect. I love the Spanish language that is interwoven giving the story more heart, lending it more authenticity and even though you might not understand it, you still understand it. (And if you don’t, then google translate, honey.) The Dominican proverb set the tone for this story really nicely; in order to get to the heart of something, in order for truth to thrive, layers have to be peeled, because secrets buried will eventually be uncovered. Or in this case the preferred method that life chose was to shock the system and turn your comfort zone on its head by sticking a knife through it. Trigger warnings for grief/death and sexual harassment. ————————— I don’t need to read the blurb to know that I will be reading this book. No diggety, no doubt.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Atkinson

    i love elizabeth's writing, so so much. this book knocked it out of the park once again. from the format to the characters to the setting, this book is lifelike and resounding. great exploration of heritage and family and different life experiences, and the first book i've read set in the dominican republic. if you liked the poet x, i highly recommend this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    This is so poignant, lyrical, heartfelt, well-conceived, true to life, sublime, extremely emotional novel about two sisters’ bounding story who never knew each other till an unexpected accident shatters their lives and takes their father away from them. Elizabeth Acevedo’s poetry combines with the heartwarming story based on true events: on November 2001, American Airlines Flight 587 flight was regularly scheduled to fly from JFK International Airport to Las Americas Airport in Santa Domingo but This is so poignant, lyrical, heartfelt, well-conceived, true to life, sublime, extremely emotional novel about two sisters’ bounding story who never knew each other till an unexpected accident shatters their lives and takes their father away from them. Elizabeth Acevedo’s poetry combines with the heartwarming story based on true events: on November 2001, American Airlines Flight 587 flight was regularly scheduled to fly from JFK International Airport to Las Americas Airport in Santa Domingo but it crashed into Belle Harbor/on the Rockaway Peninsula of Queens, took 260 people’s lives and nearly %90 was Dominican and of Dominican descent. Tragedy might be forgotten but it truly affected the lives and shaken Dominican community of New York to the core. According one of the writers of NY Times: For Dominicans: those journeys to the home were defining their complex push-pull relationship with their homeland. At the very same accident: two girls lost their father. Camino lives in Dominican Republic and Yahaira lives in NY. Camino goes to the airport to summon her father and after seeing the crying crowds of people, she startles in shock, in the meantime in New York, Yahaira is summoned to the principal’s office to get the tragic news. They don’t have enough time to digest the news when they learn double life of their father. Now they are dealing with their grief, starting to learn about each other, trying too hard to adapt in their new lives. They also need to accept the fact their father is not the perfect man they adored. Only true thing may help them move on their lives: he really loved both of them. Especially Camino’s new life conditions will be more challenging because she lives in a dangerous territory, chasing by a man named El Cero who is a local pimp. She just wants to lay low and survive, studying premed and being a normal teenager. This is so intense story consisting sensitive elements like sexual assault, grief, plane crush, betrayal, dysfunctional family dynamics. Sometimes you feel the burning sensation coming from your heart during your read and you want to stop for taking few breaths because the characters already conquered your soul and it’s so natural to ache and deeply care for them. But at the end: all those suffering and emotional stress you endured are truly worth it because this is unique and beautiful sisterhood story brighten your mood and it is one of the best young adult fiction novels of the year. Overall: I enjoyed it and I highly recommend it. blog instagram facebook twitter

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jananie (thisstoryaintover)

    excuse me while i cry over this beautiful book. Elizabeth Acevedo astounds once again. if you aren't reading her books then you robbing yourself of true heart and beauty. highly recommend the audiobook to hear the poetry aloud.

  10. 4 out of 5

    myo 🍒 (myonna reads)

    Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again! I actually do think that she is one of my favorite authors because when she writes in verse, her work just touches me differently. The way she writes is just so beautiful and she has these one liners that just leave you thinking. This story of two sisters was absolutely amazing and i already want to reread so that i can annotate it

  11. 4 out of 5

    leynes

    Okay, so here goes, I had very high expectations for Clap When You Land because The Poet X is one of my favorite books from last year. Since then I have looked up many videos by Acevedo, some of which are her performing her poetry, others simple interviews or book club discussions, and I have really fallen in love with her personality and the way she breathes power into her poetry. Elizabeth Acevedo truly is something special when it comes to writing and performing poetry. There are only a few p Okay, so here goes, I had very high expectations for Clap When You Land because The Poet X is one of my favorite books from last year. Since then I have looked up many videos by Acevedo, some of which are her performing her poetry, others simple interviews or book club discussions, and I have really fallen in love with her personality and the way she breathes power into her poetry. Elizabeth Acevedo truly is something special when it comes to writing and performing poetry. There are only a few people with her gift currently being published. Unfortunately, Clap When You Land didn't meet all of my, granted, incredibly high expectations. I desperately wanted to read it because on top of it being written by Acevedo, the premise (two sisters who had formerly not known about each other find their way toward one another through the death of their father) sounded too cool to pass it up. I love me a good novel written in verse and I thought it could be cool to see Acevedo grappling with the topics of grief, mourning and confusion (over having to reconcile the fact that your father lied to you and lead a double life – with one family in New York and the other in the Dominican Republic). However, in my humble opinion, this novel was overburdened by its themes and the pacing was just off. The two girls, Yahaira and Camino, sadly, never felt real to me. The way they reacted to their father's death and betrayal felt flat to me because they felt flat. Their emotions didn't feel real and everything about their feelings felt a little blurry. This is such a complex story and I didn't feel like we got the necessary exposure to the five stages of grief and how differently these girls would go through them. Unfortunately, both girls' voices and reactions were very similar to one another. In the audiobook it was therefore nearly impossible (at least in the beginning) to keep them apart ... I always mixed them up. And that's not a good sign. Two people are never the same... but the way these girls were thinking in almost exactly the same way, it was beyond bizarre. I heard Elizabeth Acevedo say that she had planned this book to be only written from one POV but then another author gave her the suggestion to tell the other sister's story as well. And whilst I like the idea of that I think we can still see that Acevedo had formerly worked with just one POV and the added POV was really just an afterthought. In regards to the pacing, I was simply confused by how this novel was split time-wise. We spent so much time pre-funeral (so pre-"the girls meeting each other") and I don't understand why? The novel only got really good once Yahaira flew to the DR to meet Camino for their father's funeral. On top of the themes of grief, loss and betrayal, Clap When You Land is also about sexual harassment. Yahaira details one horrific story in which she was molested during a train ride when she was younger, and Camino is currently dealing with the threat of the local pimp, who is stalking her and wants her to work for him. This pimp, El Sero, is truly one of the most disgusting characters I ever saw in YA contemporary and the threat of his presence was very palpable. However, similar to my first complaint, I feel like this complex subject matter was not discussed in-depth enough. Even though El Sero was constantly on Camino's mind we didn't really see how his disgusting behaviour took a toll on her mentally. On top of that, I don't appreciate all these YA books pushing the message that it's normal for teenagers to not open up with their problems to their parents, and seek parental help for protection. So please, if you (similarly to Camino) have a good relationship to your parents or guardians, DEFINITELY tell them when someone is stalking you and making you feel unsafe and uncomfortable. Do not keep it a secret. I just want to see more YA books where behaviour like this (aka seeking help and communicating with your parents) is normalised because in this story it really comes down to the pimp trying to rape Camino and just because Yahaira figured out where she might've been, they managed to get out of that horrific situation. And sure, that has more shock value, but I'm not here for it. (Even though, I am of course here for Thea wielding that fucking machete at El Sero and summoning her Gods. We gotta stan that woman!) Also, the ending, with Camino moving to NY with Yahaira didn't explore what that would really mean. I don't think Acevedo went for a happy-happy ending this time, it was supposed to be bittersweet with Camino having to give up her home in order to have a safe (...safer) life, however, I really wanted more from that and explore Camino's feelings further. Sure, we saw her crying at the airport, not wanting to leave her aunt, feeling guilty ... but in my humble opinion, Camino having to leave the DR was the most heartbreaking part of this book. The consequences of the disruption and abruption of her life, just thinking about it opens up a vastness that I can't put into words ... I hated how that was handled on three pages by Acevedo, almost as if she shrugged off the meaningfulness of this life-altering event. But even though this book had many shortcomings, I still feel very comfortable giving it three stars because A) the premise was good and something I haven't seen done in YA before, B) the representation in this book is flawless again (and not just in regards to our beautiful Black queens... I really have to give a shoutout to Acevedo for flawlessly weaving queer characters into all (!) of her books as well, Acevedo is really out here calling out all other authors who still can't seem to manage that) and C) her writing is just beautiful (and funnily enough, something that I wouldn't have expected, even suspenseful. This book had me on the edge of my seat at times!).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    4.5 stars Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again. This is a gorgeously written story told in verse, and I listened to the audiobook again which I think is the best way to consume her books. This story follows two sisters who are unaware that the other exists. They discover each other when their Father dies in a plane crash, one of them lives in New York and the other in the Dominican Republic. They both grieve as they realize their Father lived two lives. Like all of Elizabeth Acevedo's books this s 4.5 stars Elizabeth Acevedo has done it again. This is a gorgeously written story told in verse, and I listened to the audiobook again which I think is the best way to consume her books. This story follows two sisters who are unaware that the other exists. They discover each other when their Father dies in a plane crash, one of them lives in New York and the other in the Dominican Republic. They both grieve as they realize their Father lived two lives. Like all of Elizabeth Acevedo's books this story is written so so beautifully and it touches on a lot of heartfelt, sensitive topics. I especially loved this one because I love stories that follow sisters and this format and story-telling style was really interesting, I liked going back and forth between their POV's. I also have a great relationship with my Dad and I could never imagine losing him, let alone going through what these girls have to go through, I just felt so much for them and the audiobook actually made me tear up a few times. Anytime a book discusses the grief of losing a parent it really hits me hard because that's a pain I can't even begin to imagine. Elizabeth Acevedo is one of the best YA writers out there right now. I'm rarely ever interested in reading YA anymore but I will always, always pick up her books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    may ➹

    update: I am also ditching... look away everyone in my buddy read group ditched me...... is this what it feels like to have your heart ripped out of its chest (it’s fine I’m just not weak like them) // buddy read with a bunch of my favorites who I’ll tag later! traitors

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This book was amazing. I love how it was written in verse. I'm usually not into books written in verse but this one was just so stunning. The story of two teens living two different lives realize they have more than they think in common. This book tackles so many things, race, grief, sexual assault, family, and more. It will be a book that sticks with you and the characters as well.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Nuckles

    Duuuuuuude—how does Elizabeth Acevedo DO IT?! If you were questioning whether to pick this book up, just do it. No questions asked. No ifs, ands, or buts. DO IT.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    Elizabeth Acevedo's new book, Clap When You Land , is a novel-in-verse about family, grief, anger, and letting go.⁣ Camino is a teenage girl living in the Dominican Republic with her aunt, who works as a healer. Her father, who lives in New York, comes to visit every summer, and Camino lives for those visits. Yet on the day his plane is to arrive and she waits for him at the airport, she learns that his plane has crashed.⁣ Another teenage girl, Yahaira, lives in New York. Her father goes home t Elizabeth Acevedo's new book, Clap When You Land , is a novel-in-verse about family, grief, anger, and letting go.⁣ Camino is a teenage girl living in the Dominican Republic with her aunt, who works as a healer. Her father, who lives in New York, comes to visit every summer, and Camino lives for those visits. Yet on the day his plane is to arrive and she waits for him at the airport, she learns that his plane has crashed.⁣ Another teenage girl, Yahaira, lives in New York. Her father goes home to the Dominican Republic each summer, which causes a strain on his relationship with her mother. One morning she is called out of her class and told by her mother that her father’s plane crashed.⁣ ⁣Both girls are grief-struck, devastated by the loss of their father. Camino has dreams of going to college in New York and studying medicine, and now isn’t even sure how she and her aunt will survive, especially as a dangerous man she has been protected from all this time circles closer.⁣ ⁣Yahaira, who discovered a secret about her father before he died, feels guilty, angry, and deceived, yet doesn’t know how to live without her hero. She tries to push everyone away. ⁣When the two girls learn of each other, it is a shocking discovery of a connection that wounds but might ultimately save them both.⁣ ⁣ Clap When You Land is poignant, luminous, and powerful. Acevedo imbues her words with such vivid imagery and raw emotion. It didn’t quite hit me as hard as I expected it to given the subject matter, but it still was a book that will stick with me.⁣ Acevedo's two earlier books, The Poet X and With the Fire on High , are master works. Check out my list of the best books I read in 2019 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2019.html. Check out my list of the best books of the decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mari

    If you asked me what I was, & you meant in terms of culture, I'd say Dominican. No hesitation, no question about it. Can you be from a place you've never been? You can find the island stamped all over me. but what would the island find if I was there? Can you claim a home that does not know you, much less claim you as its own? Why you may not like this book: It's told in verse. Novels told in verse are by design told with economy. You'll find lots of reviews talking about that as if it is a lack rather If you asked me what I was, & you meant in terms of culture, I'd say Dominican. No hesitation, no question about it. Can you be from a place you've never been? You can find the island stamped all over me. but what would the island find if I was there? Can you claim a home that does not know you, much less claim you as its own? Why you may not like this book: It's told in verse. Novels told in verse are by design told with economy. You'll find lots of reviews talking about that as if it is a lack rather than something you are signing up for. You may not like this if you need something more expansive. Also, this is a story that touches on a lot of topics, but if you are expecting a deep dive into any one of them, into the complexities of immigration, poverty, split families, adultery, island living, you won't enjoy this. This isn't a story meant to teach you about these things; these are realities for our two main characters, captured succinctly by Acevedo. Why I loved this book: I've said about her other books, but it's a little heartbreaking to me that I'm reading these as an adult. I know they would've been transformative for me as a teen. That said, I'm filled with joy thinking of all the young Dominican girls and young Afro-Latinas who get to see their stories reflected WITH HAPPY ENDINGS. There were so many moments and experiences that Acevedo captures that were things I've never seen or don't often seen explored in fiction. On page one she opens describing the mud of a rainy season in DR, but also the way culture and place leaves marks and tracks. Two things in this novel I especially loved: this story of a Dominican man living in the US, a family in each location, is one that isn't as uncommon as maybe people think. It's something I grew up hearing about, happening to women I knew. The infidelity and machismo that can be rampant in Dominican culture is a source of grief as it is in Clap When You Land, and we watch these two girls process that grief and the dueling realities of a man who was a good father, but a bad husband. I love that it puts that idea at the center of this story, and then populates it with all of these incredible and strong women. Secondly, this explores the diaspora from two ends: the way the island is stamped on first generation Americans, and the way that America sits in dreams of those on the island split from their families. I'm a sucker for stories about grief, and unsurprisingly, Acevedo navigates it well. So many times, I felt the struggle of the narrators between what they knew to be true, what they should be doing, and what they were feeling. This is a snapshot of moments starting at the death of Camino and Yahira's father and tracking as they build a new reality. I listened to this on audiobook because I love hearing Acevedo read her poetry. This has a second narrator in Melania-Luisa Marte, who also did a fantastic job. I read other reviews that struggled with differentiating between Camino and Yahira's voices, but that is something I didn't feel while listening. Overall, another stunning entry from Acevedo, hands down one of the best authors writing currently, and deserving of every bit of praise she receives.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    This was an absolute joy and a privilege to listen to. Highly recommended! *Full disclosure: I used an audio credit supplied by Libro.FM as part of their affiliate program.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    Acevedo is at the top of her game. This one will be hard to beat in the years to come or even decades to come. I do not usually like books written in verse. But when it comes to this author, I like it more when it's in verse. She's so good at this! Everything makes sense about this book. The cover, the title, the story, the characters, the ending. I have loved the book written in verse 'The Poet X" years ago when it came out and I was in the middle of reading her other book 'With The Fire On High' Acevedo is at the top of her game. This one will be hard to beat in the years to come or even decades to come. I do not usually like books written in verse. But when it comes to this author, I like it more when it's in verse. She's so good at this! Everything makes sense about this book. The cover, the title, the story, the characters, the ending. I have loved the book written in verse 'The Poet X" years ago when it came out and I was in the middle of reading her other book 'With The Fire On High' which came out just last year. Each of her book tells a very different story but nevertheless similar stories of girls with multicultural backgrounds and the lives of these girls on what they have to face through normal days. But this particular book turned out to rip my heart into pieces (I wasn't expecting that!). The story deals with the sudden demise of a father in a plane crash (based on the September 11, 2001, flight AA587 crash). The book is the story of a girl's journey of her grieving process and how she discovers some of painful secrets her family but finding something precious and completes her life in the end. There's another girl who's going through the same road as hers in another part of the world. This is the story of Camino and Yahaira. The story is wholesome, painful yet hopeful. *Book in verse *Sexual assault in some parts *Lgbtq representation done well I don't remember how many times I had to put down the book because I was sobbing senseless while reading it 😭 Clap When You Land, what have you done to me???! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~````~~~~~~````~~~~~~~~``````~~~~~~````~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~``````~~~~~~~~~~~~~```````~~~~~~~~~``````~~~~~~~~~~```~~~~~~~````~~~~~~~~~``````~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~``~~~~~`````~~~~~~``````~~~~~~~~~ (you can now drown in my ocean of tears I cried since page 1).

  20. 5 out of 5

    emma

    update: this buddy read was canceled when 3 out of 4 of us didn't want to read poetry. kind of iconic of us wouldn't you say ------------- please don't ask when i realized this book is written in poetry (but it was after i started) buddy read with my three favs update: this buddy read was canceled when 3 out of 4 of us didn't want to read poetry. kind of iconic of us wouldn't you say ------------- please don't ask when i realized this book is written in poetry (but it was after i started) buddy read with my three favs

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mariah

    I’m gonna need Elizabeth Acevedo to crawl out of my soul because this is too much. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, this woman is incapable of writing anything but 5 star masterpieces. I can’t actually talk about this book without breaking down so I’m gonna leave it at that. X So this cover pops up in my feed and I'm like: "Wow". And then I read the synopsys and my mind is like: "Damn, this would probably be great in audiobook format, but maybe I'm just picturing this as an Elizabeth Aceved I’m gonna need Elizabeth Acevedo to crawl out of my soul because this is too much. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, this woman is incapable of writing anything but 5 star masterpieces. I can’t actually talk about this book without breaking down so I’m gonna leave it at that. X So this cover pops up in my feed and I'm like: "Wow". And then I read the synopsys and my mind is like: "Damn, this would probably be great in audiobook format, but maybe I'm just picturing this as an Elizabeth Acevedo type of thing." And then I looked up to actually see who wrote this. I swear to god you can *smell* this woman's talent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Olivia (Stories For Coffee)

    There comes a time when one stumbles upon a story that echoes all the pain, their anger, and the grief that has been swirling in one’s heart for years. One may think they are alone in these feelings until they find a book that mirrors all those emotions back to you. That is what Clap When You Land was like for me. I’ve always been a fan of Elizabeth Acevedo’s works. She’s one of my favorite authors of all time. Each story she shares with the world has echoed feelings I’ve had but never truly exp There comes a time when one stumbles upon a story that echoes all the pain, their anger, and the grief that has been swirling in one’s heart for years. One may think they are alone in these feelings until they find a book that mirrors all those emotions back to you. That is what Clap When You Land was like for me. I’ve always been a fan of Elizabeth Acevedo’s works. She’s one of my favorite authors of all time. Each story she shares with the world has echoed feelings I’ve had but never truly explored or expressed to others. Not only are her writing and characters outstanding and utterly remarkable but the way she grapples with the various layers Latinx identity is something that I’ve never experienced before. She makes me feel seen in ways I cannot describe. I’m forever grateful for this story for reminding me that one isn’t alone in these various experiences. Thank you, Elizabeth, for continuing to write beautiful prose, fascinating characters, and experiences that comfort the heart and mind and remind us we’re not alone. Thank you for your soothing voice and the passion you put into narrating your stories. (Please listen to her works on audiobook; she narrates them herself and is absolutely talented in that line of work) AT A GLANCE • Two sisters: one born in NYC, the other in Dominican Republic come together once their father passes away in a plane crash • Deals with trauma, familial secrets, grief, found family • F/F relationship ! TW: Sexual assault (on page), stalking, death of a parent

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya

    “I’m the child her father left her for in the summers. While she is the child my father left me for my entire life.” This is the book about families, and secrets, and love, and grief, and loss. It is a story of betrayal, and anger, and disappointment. This is a story of a world broken apart by a tragedy. It is a story about losing your heroes and finding your heroes. This is also a story of class and privilege. A story of advantages that your birth place holds. A story of the difference money “I’m the child her father left her for in the summers. While she is the child my father left me for my entire life.” This is the book about families, and secrets, and love, and grief, and loss. It is a story of betrayal, and anger, and disappointment. This is a story of a world broken apart by a tragedy. It is a story about losing your heroes and finding your heroes. This is also a story of class and privilege. A story of advantages that your birth place holds. A story of the difference money can make, and of the crippling grip of poverty and the hold it has over even the most determined lives. This is also a story of dreams and wants and longings so strong that it hurts. It is strong and raw and tender and bruised. It is a story of raw despair and cautious hope. It is a story of love. “So he created a theater of his life & got lost in all the different roles he had to play.” One summer day a tragedy happens, and lives are changed forever. A plane headed from New York to the Dominican Republic crashes into the ocean, and there are no survivors. “But those of us from the island will all know someone who died on that flight.” Camino Rios, a Dominican girl, who loves swimming and dreams of being able to leave the island and escape the future of poverty and exploitation that is the destiny of so many around her (and the dangerous attention of a very dangerous person), loses her father on that flight. Yahaira Rios, a Dominican American New York girl, a former star chess player who carries the secret that knocked her father off the pedestal she had built for him, also loses a father on that flight. The girls have never met, but they share a bond built of betrayal of trust — their father, “[a] hustler. A no-nonsense street-smart guy”, a man who loved chess and swimming — and apparently also loved two women with whom he built simultaneous but separate lives in different countries which may as well be different worlds. A man who had two families, two daughters, two worlds that were forced together by his death. “Papi will have two funerals. Papi will have two ceremonies. Papi will be mourned in two countries. Papi will be said goodbye to here & there. Papi had two lives. Papi has two daughters. Papi was a man split in two, playing a game against himself. But the problem with that is that in order to win, you also always lose.” If you ever had anyone you loved and trusted turn out to be a very different person from the one you knew, you will share the heartbreak of this book. If you had ever had your childhood hero and your rock not live to the expectations you built up, you’ll understand the pain. Because our heroes do not always live up to their own myths. Because even the most trusted ones are capable of lies and betrayals. Because the concepts of a “complicated person” and an “asshole” can sometimes overlap. “My father having two families is also not an uncommon story. When Yahaira messaged me she seemed unutterably betrayed. As if she couldn’t believe this of Papi. But me, I know a man can have many faces & speak out of both sides of his mouth; I know a man can make decisions based on the flip of a coin; a man can be real good at long division, give away piece after piece after piece of himself.” But betrayal and heartbreak and tragedy can also help uncover something else. New ties, new heroes, new hopes. When one thing is lost, you can find something else worth fighting for.And those are things to be thankful for, to clap for when you land. “I tell her that when we land some people on the plane might clap. She turns to me with an eyebrow raised. I imagine it’s kind of giving thanks. Of all the ways it could end it ends not with us in the sky or the water, but together on solid earth safely grounded.” ———————— ———————— I’ve been raised with “traditional” poetry (until this, perhaps the only novel in verse that I ever read was Eugene Onegin), and to me it’s always been the same - the structure, the rhyme, the rhythm. I never cared much for verse, really. So this to me was a rather new and fresh experience. Written in free verse, it sounds like lyrical speech, a lyrical prose, a spoken word with different rhythms — nothing that my rigid understanding would have seen as poetry. And I loved it. It was done very well. It won me over, slowly but surely. I noticed that I read it differently that I usually do, actually sounding out each line in the mental voice instead of reading in chunks like I usually do — I guess like you *would* read poetry — and I loved it. And then I’d get distracted trying to imagine it written as a prose, without the line breaks that suggest the rhythm of reading — and still loved it. And then I realized that I got to the end without even noticing the verse anymore because it felt so organic. And that was perfect. 4 stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kevin (Irish Reader)

    TW: Stalking, Sexual assault, loss of a parent I thoroughly enjoyed this book! Elizabeth Acevedo is becoming an auto buy author for me. This book deals with two girls coming to terms with the loss of their dad and how they both grieve. I connected to both of the characters and found their voices to be very distinct, which is great since this in written in dual POV. The writing was beautiful and lyrical. My only reason I couldn’t give it 5 stars was for me personally I found the pacing to be a lit TW: Stalking, Sexual assault, loss of a parent I thoroughly enjoyed this book! Elizabeth Acevedo is becoming an auto buy author for me. This book deals with two girls coming to terms with the loss of their dad and how they both grieve. I connected to both of the characters and found their voices to be very distinct, which is great since this in written in dual POV. The writing was beautiful and lyrical. My only reason I couldn’t give it 5 stars was for me personally I found the pacing to be a little slow and it dragged for me at parts. I also read this book during a 24 hour readathon and you can check out the video here to hear more of my thoughts: https://youtu.be/_xMcY58rFaw

  25. 4 out of 5

    ✨ jamieson ✨

    Beautifully written, emotionally rich and dripping with emotion, CLAP WHEN YOU LAND is a unique and evocative contemporary YA novel that deals deftly with themes of grief, loss, change, and the difficulties of family. Written in verse, Acevedo's novel explores the flaws that make a person and finding solace and peace within the boundaries of tragedy. I loved the space and depth Acevedo gave the two main characters to explore their emotions, and the complex exploration of how a person with many f Beautifully written, emotionally rich and dripping with emotion, CLAP WHEN YOU LAND is a unique and evocative contemporary YA novel that deals deftly with themes of grief, loss, change, and the difficulties of family. Written in verse, Acevedo's novel explores the flaws that make a person and finding solace and peace within the boundaries of tragedy. I loved the space and depth Acevedo gave the two main characters to explore their emotions, and the complex exploration of how a person with many flaws can still mean a lot in someone's life. I do wish the start of this book had not been so slow, however. The main interest is the meeting of the two girls, which happens much later in the book then I felt needed. I also would have liked more time to explore the end of the series and a more distinct difference between the voices of the two main characters. Elizabeth Acevedo is an author whose really starting to make her mark on the YA genre, and I love to see it. Clap When You Land is stamped with her emotional style and evocative writing and is definitely a highlight for me amongst 2020 YA releases

  26. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    This is a complex story about grief and loss, but also betrayal. It has the iconic Acevedo beautifully lyrical writing (this one is in verse) and is told by both sisters: Camino and Yahaira. They just don't know each other exists because their dad had two secret families and the girls didn't know until he died in a tragic plane accident. It's a hard read because it's so full of grief, but also anger. Like how could he do this to them? But they also both love him so deeply, their grief threatens This is a complex story about grief and loss, but also betrayal. It has the iconic Acevedo beautifully lyrical writing (this one is in verse) and is told by both sisters: Camino and Yahaira. They just don't know each other exists because their dad had two secret families and the girls didn't know until he died in a tragic plane accident. It's a hard read because it's so full of grief, but also anger. Like how could he do this to them? But they also both love him so deeply, their grief threatens to drown them. I loved the writing, the raw emotion, the relationships and the characters who leapt off the page. Both girls lives are hard, but in different ways. Camino lives in the Dominican Republic and is poor, she dreams of going to uni but can barely afford highschool. She hardly ever sees her dad. She has a creepy stalker (known for selling girls). Yahaira lives in NYC and is struggling with traumas of her own, plus feeling her dad didn't love his family enough. She also has the sweetest girlfriend. And when she finds out about Camino, Yahaira will do anything to meet her. The only part I struggled with was the excuses for the father. I get they grieved for him but this guy 🥴married two women? gaslit Yahaira? didn't properly provide for Camino? And in the end the families are like "he was a complex man..." 🤨 sir.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peyton Reads

    This book just made me ugly cry omg

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    Am I only just now adding all three of this authors books to my TBR because I have been living under a rock? Yes. Yes I am.

  29. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    This was absolutely phenomenal. My heart is broken in the best way. RTC 💖 diversity: most characters are Dominican (both MCs and almost all side characters), Yahaira is a lesbian, Yahaira's girlfriend is Black, Camino's best friend is Haitian.

  30. 4 out of 5

    love, tappkalina

    The more I think about it, the less I like it.

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