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The Clue of the Broken Locket

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Another vacation turns into a riddle for Nancy to solve while she visits a lakeside holiday area. Cecily Curtis seeks the girl sleuth’s help in solving two mysteries. One concerns her fiancé, a popular singer who believes his record company is cheating him. The other involves a hidden family treasure; the only clue is half of a gold locket. Strange circumstances provide Na Another vacation turns into a riddle for Nancy to solve while she visits a lakeside holiday area. Cecily Curtis seeks the girl sleuth’s help in solving two mysteries. One concerns her fiancé, a popular singer who believes his record company is cheating him. The other involves a hidden family treasure; the only clue is half of a gold locket. Strange circumstances provide Nancy with many opportunities to test her sleuthing skills and discover the astounding secrets of Pudding Stone Lodge. This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1934) is different.


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Another vacation turns into a riddle for Nancy to solve while she visits a lakeside holiday area. Cecily Curtis seeks the girl sleuth’s help in solving two mysteries. One concerns her fiancé, a popular singer who believes his record company is cheating him. The other involves a hidden family treasure; the only clue is half of a gold locket. Strange circumstances provide Na Another vacation turns into a riddle for Nancy to solve while she visits a lakeside holiday area. Cecily Curtis seeks the girl sleuth’s help in solving two mysteries. One concerns her fiancé, a popular singer who believes his record company is cheating him. The other involves a hidden family treasure; the only clue is half of a gold locket. Strange circumstances provide Nancy with many opportunities to test her sleuthing skills and discover the astounding secrets of Pudding Stone Lodge. This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1934) is different.

30 review for The Clue of the Broken Locket

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    My first childhood Nancy Drew....loved it and I was hooked!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ann-Marie

    Probably read in 1964 or 1965.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Okay, seriously, Nancy Drew might really want to consider finding a new area of the country to live in. I cannot believe how many people get kidnapped, held hostage, tied up, etc. all within a very short convertible drive from the lovely home she shares with her father and their housekeeper. I mean, really, people are getting kidnapped left and right! This book has two children kidnapped, then their mother held hostage and tied up and gagged and kept in an attic when she tries to rescue them, an Okay, seriously, Nancy Drew might really want to consider finding a new area of the country to live in. I cannot believe how many people get kidnapped, held hostage, tied up, etc. all within a very short convertible drive from the lovely home she shares with her father and their housekeeper. I mean, really, people are getting kidnapped left and right! This book has two children kidnapped, then their mother held hostage and tied up and gagged and kept in an attic when she tries to rescue them, and even Nancy and a friend are the victims of an attempted kidnapping. Thankfully they had their whits about them and realized what was happening so they could jump out of the kidnappers car when it came to a stoplight! But honestly, these books can be so silly sometimes in their plots. My daughter loves them though, and since they are clean reads with no deaths or sex (the boys always politely go home or to a rented room when it gets late) they are fine to read to her. I do wish the boys would start doing the cooking once in a while though. They always show back up in the morning and expect the girls (Nancy, and the cousins Bess and George) to cook them breakfast! Get with the program men!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    I try to read (re-read) the Nancy Drew books as the ten-to-twelve year old girl I was when I first discovered them. (Imagine my horror when a town librarian told me the 'library didn't carry those' as they weren't 'good literature?' Well, anything which keeps a child reading is good enough in my book. Well, almost anything.) Anyhow, here I am over fifty years later thinking, what was I thinking? Because this particular book has to be one of the worst in the series. Forget the plot, (Nancy and fri I try to read (re-read) the Nancy Drew books as the ten-to-twelve year old girl I was when I first discovered them. (Imagine my horror when a town librarian told me the 'library didn't carry those' as they weren't 'good literature?' Well, anything which keeps a child reading is good enough in my book. Well, almost anything.) Anyhow, here I am over fifty years later thinking, what was I thinking? Because this particular book has to be one of the worst in the series. Forget the plot, (Nancy and friends help out yet another girl who's seeking a long-lost family fortune), the characters are so wooden I ended up laughing at the end of each cliff-hanger-type chapter. That was my initial reaction, but... Then I went back and reconsidered; read it as that ten-year old girl. Had I been excited or concerned when a log rolled down a hill and almost killed Nancy and her new friend? Probably. How about when she gets kidnapped? Maybe. What about when she takes a rowboat out to the middle of a swampy lake to figure out why people keep seeing a large boat sink with people on board - something which happened decades ago? A ghost ship! And then there's a hole in Nancy's boat and she has to swim in the dark in a swamp to safety? I must have been thrilled! So, when Nancy and friends decide to help a girl who has half a locket, and a family secret to untangle, and a wedding to plan (he's an up and coming rock star!) and who rents a cabin on a lake in the middle of nowhere to do all this - I must have loved it. Because for atmospherics, the story has it all. Creepy cabin. Prowlers all about. Screaming loons at night. A nearby estate constructed of 'pudding-stone' or local fieldstone in which creepy people live who mistreat a pair of three-year old twins. Wow. Add in the boyfriends arriving late in the story to add a tiny bit of sexual tension. (TINY BIT.) I must have eaten this up with a spoon. A few more comments: Nancy is the tidiest girl on the planet. Even in the midst of chaos and crisis - someone throws a rock through the cabin window and hits two people, knocking them out - Nancy and her friends always 'tidy up' the house or kitchen before trekking off to do some 'sleuthing.' They're admirable, perfect girls, who sent their 'dates' home at night and always make sure someone's had their breakfast. However, though the ten-year old me would prob. have gladly given this five wonderful stars, the old me can only give it two. Too much happens, too many characters, not enough reaction to anything at all. One perilous, dangerous event happens on top of another and the response is: let's get lunch, tidy up, and do some more sleuthing. How practical of them, but also, how stupid. Sorry, ten-year old me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    "When two adopted parents are unsuitable for caring of baby twins, Nancy sets out to search for the rightful birth mother with the help of a broken locket." - Upon meeting the Blair's Nancy mentions that its a shame the adopted twins biological mother never claimed them. Kitty Blair responds by saying "when a mother abandons her children, she should lose all right to them!". Nancy immediately starts coming up with excuses for how the mother could have been tricked into being separated from her ch "When two adopted parents are unsuitable for caring of baby twins, Nancy sets out to search for the rightful birth mother with the help of a broken locket." - Upon meeting the Blair's Nancy mentions that its a shame the adopted twins biological mother never claimed them. Kitty Blair responds by saying "when a mother abandons her children, she should lose all right to them!". Nancy immediately starts coming up with excuses for how the mother could have been tricked into being separated from her children. Just cause Nancy doesn't like the Blair's she's willing to defend some unknown woman. You don't have to like the Blair's to agree that abandoning children is wrong. - This is one of the Nancy Drew books that contains racism. As much as I love Mildred Wirt's writing she seems to have been extremely racist. Any money hungry villain's in the original books were Jewish. In this its mentioned that the Blair's real surname is Sellenstein, which in itself would not raise any red flags. It was a normal practice for performers to change a long last name to a short, easy to remember one that would fit better on a theater marquee. However couple it with the fact that the Blair's have a get-rich-quick scheme to adopt children and pimp them out to the public mixed with Wirt's history of "hooked nose" characters scheming for money and yep, all signs point to antisemitism. - Strangely enough an effort is made multiple times to let the reader know not all theater people are like the Blair's. Its almost as if someone associated with the book was terribly worried about offending theater people. #notalltheaterpeople You can read the rest of this review at VintageGirlsBooks.blogspot.com "Nancy Drew and her friends are plunged into a network of strange events when they visit Misty Lake. The very night they arrive they meet pretty, red-haired Cecily Curtis, who seeks Nancy's help in solving two mysteries: one concerning Cecily's fiance, Niko Van Dyke, a popular singer who believes that his record company is cheating him out of royalty payments; the other, involving a family treasure hidden before the start of the Civil War- Cecily's only clue being half of a gold locket. Nancy's investigations lead her to Pudding Stone Lodge, where the sinister Driscoll family lives. Elusive humming noises, a flashing light in the attic of the lodge, the periodic apparition of an excursion launch which had sunk in Misty Lake years ago, and the fleeting appearance of a frightened girl who strongly resembles Cecily give Nancy plenty of opportunity to test her sleuthing skills. Braving a series of dangerous situations and discouraging developments, the alert young detective perseveres in her attempts to solve both mysteries and reveal the astounding secrets of Pudding Stone Lodge." I was excited to re-read this book because I recalled it being one of my favorites however seeing as how my recent re-readings of my favorite Nancy Drew books have turned out I was quite eager to see if this one would still remain a favorite. Like a good amount of the other books I couldn't remember hardly anything from this story. All I remembered was the cottage on the lake, the large stone house, Cecily, Satin, the children, and counterfeit records. I didn't even remember Susan or the ghost ship! - I think the setting for this book is PERFECT. A cozy little cabin on the edge of haunted, foggy lake with a dark past; it was the perfect setting for a mystery. I also loved the retro touches, which were of course modern at the time, that include the soda fountain, counterfeit vinyl records, and Niko's bands name; The Flying Dutchmen. Its so kitsch, I love it! - Like most readers I'm pretty disgusted that the girls don't mind Satin catching and eating a mouse inside the little cabin. I mean Nancy changes her clothes anytime she steps foot outside so you'd think she'd be more sanitary cautious. - The rock throwing incident is ridiculous to me. The villain's throw a heavy rock at the back of the couch which causes Cecily and Niko to fly off it and hit their heads on the fireplace hearth...you know, totally plausible. You can read the rest of this review at VintageGirlsBooks.blogspot.com My Original Review: I've read both versions and they are both pretty good. The original is interesting because Nancy pisses off a maid and she tries to get revenge by planting stolen jewelry on Nancy. This woman wasn't even the villain of the story or anything so that was interesting. The revised is a little strange because Nancy, Bess, and George meet a girl and she immediately invites them to stay with her which does not seem wise. Also her cat's name is Satin which I kept reading as Satan. Lol

  6. 5 out of 5

    B.M.B. Johnson

    Another day, another mystery. Nancy's father doesn't have time to deal with another of his client's issues, so of course he sends his teen-age daughter out in the woods to take care of things. "It's super dangerous, so take a couple of your friends with you -- you know to increase the carnage if things go bad," he says between the lines. "And also feel free to invite the boyfriends along later. They are sexless cardboard cutouts, so you'll be fine." Maybe it was in a bad mood when I read this, but Another day, another mystery. Nancy's father doesn't have time to deal with another of his client's issues, so of course he sends his teen-age daughter out in the woods to take care of things. "It's super dangerous, so take a couple of your friends with you -- you know to increase the carnage if things go bad," he says between the lines. "And also feel free to invite the boyfriends along later. They are sexless cardboard cutouts, so you'll be fine." Maybe it was in a bad mood when I read this, but this particular tome seems a tad out of date -- perhaps even for the times in which it was written. Although it follows the basic Nancy Drew formula: Do something dangerous because your father has too many cases (it's awesome that he trusts her, don't get me wrong -- but he already had a wife die and every book he just shoves a pipe in my mouth and sends his daughter off to war any chance he gets); Nancy invites her friends "The bold one" and the "chubby one" (yes, even in progressive female-led books we're making fun of the overweight character); Nancy bites off more than she can chew (or rather there's NEVER just one mystery, there's usually 3 or 4 ALL RELATED TO THE SAME ANTAGONISTS!); as an aside -- but not usually to help to any great degree (which is usually my favorite part of the book), the boyfriends are called (usually for some kind of sock hop), and not one of them tries to make a move on the girls (?)..."Well get our own cabin, and see you in the morning!" --apparently sex wasn't invented until the 70's; the cops of course don't believe her at first, so Nancy and her friends get in trouble; Nancy finds a hidden alcove so that she can overhear the bad guys [probably due to time constraints -- because the plot ran long] talking about how and why they did the bad thing they did; and then the mystery is solved and Nancy's already musing about her next adventure (usually along with a little advertisement for the next book.) Neat. Tidy. Telling instead of showing. Unrealistic communication. Although charming, and I'll still read the next one of these because I love them. BMB

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dean Cummings

    “Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.” – Rachel Carson “The Clue of the Broken Locket” begins in one of my favorites of the Nancy Drew traditions, the “over the dining room table” father and daughter discussions about promising, exciting new mysteries. In this case, it’s over breakfast that Carson Drew, a River Heights attorney tells his daughter, super-sleuth Nancy about an intriguing set of circumstances involving a cabin on Misty lake “Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.” – Rachel Carson “The Clue of the Broken Locket” begins in one of my favorites of the Nancy Drew traditions, the “over the dining room table” father and daughter discussions about promising, exciting new mysteries. In this case, it’s over breakfast that Carson Drew, a River Heights attorney tells his daughter, super-sleuth Nancy about an intriguing set of circumstances involving a cabin on Misty lake in Maryland. The cabin is owned by a man named Lawrence Baker, a longtime client of Mr. Drew. Mr. Baker had arranged to rent his summer cottage to a young woman he and his family know who named Cecily Curtis. This young lady has quite an interesting life story, Carson says, but apparently that is all Mr. Baker had the time to say about her as he was dashing off to a trip to Europe. It was during that last hasty phone conversation that Mr. Baker asked Mr. Drew to draw up a rental agreement for Cecily Curtis to sign. Mr. Baker, Carson explained, had also hired a local man named Henry Winch to keep an eye on the cottage, and he was also to be present at the cabin to open it for Miss Curtis when she arrived. Mr. Drew told Nancy that he thought it was a rather unusual time of year for Miss Curtis to plan a stay at the lake, considering it was the off season and there would be very little for her to do while she was there. It just seemed strange for a single young woman to be taking a vacation at that time, especially considering she would be on her own. And then he turned to his daughter, “And there’s another mystery at the cabin as well…” he said as he smiled, his eyes twinkling. Nancy laughed, “Please don’t keep me in suspense!” The attorney then reached into his pocket and brought out the key to the cabin and a plain piece of paper, which he handed to Nancy. She unfolded the paper, reading the note: “Hire somebody else. I’m scared.” H. Winch “This is all he wrote?” Nancy asked. “Yes, and here’s the problem. Cecily Curtis is to arrive at Misty Lake tomorrow evening, but Mr. Winch apparently wants nothing to do with the cottage. I can’t leave at the moment, so I thought you could drive down there with the key and open the cabin for Miss Curtis. I don’t want you to go alone though.” “Maybe Bess and George can join me?” Nancy enthused as she thought of Bess Marvin and George Fayne, two friends she’d shared many exciting adventures with before. Her father agrees with the suggestion and Nancy calls both Bess and George, pleased that both are available to take the trip to Misty Lake with her. She tells her father the good news, “There’s a nice guest house in the Village of Misty Lake, about a mile from the water,” he informs her. Nancy contacts the guest house, and since it’s the slow season, she’s able to secure a reservation for the three for the next day. Nancy packs her bags and drives to pick up Bess, then George. Soon, they are one their way to Misty Lake. They’d only covered a short distance when George says, “Now Nancy, give us the details on the case we’re going to solve.” “First of all, there’s a frightened caretaker,” she began, then told them the little she knew about Cecily Curtis. As they continued down the highway the three began to do a lot of guessing about Mr. Winch and Miss Curtis. They arrive in the village, soon finding the guest house, a wonderful white framed home with a large front room on the second floor with three beds. The owner was Mrs. Hosking. “Tell me, are you girls on a trip?” She asks. “Well, sort of,” Nancy replied. “We have the key for the person who rented the Baker cottage. Then we’d like to find Mr. Winch.” Mrs. Hosking shuddered, “Girls, don’t go down to that cottage-especially at night. Why, just two days ago Henry came dashing in here white as a ghost. Now, he’s not a man who scares easily!” The three girls looked to one another…all keenly aware that there was definitely a mystery to be solved here. What followed was a amazing parade of story gems including: A mysterious disappearing girl, a family heirloom containing clues to a lost treasure, a treacherous canoe sinking, an attempted kidnapping, a ruthless band of LP record pirates, and best of all an ending so heart warming I found myself wiping away a tear. Mine was the 1965 edition written by Mildred Benson ghostwriting as Carolyn Keen. According to what I’ve researched, Benson was paid $85 to write up this version, that’s about $700 in today’s money. Writing this story was obviously a labor of love for Mildred Benson. And a gift to all of us!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    For as many of them as there are and as popular as they purportedly have been over decades of readers, this was a huge disappointment. Nancy Drew is full of bland, shallow characters, predictable and slow-paced action, and boring and unnecessary detail. First things first -- characters. A good writer can take a character you don't really want to like and make you like them, as with Sherlock Holmes. Yes, he's brilliant, but he's very annoying. However, you can't help but like him, faults and all. For as many of them as there are and as popular as they purportedly have been over decades of readers, this was a huge disappointment. Nancy Drew is full of bland, shallow characters, predictable and slow-paced action, and boring and unnecessary detail. First things first -- characters. A good writer can take a character you don't really want to like and make you like them, as with Sherlock Holmes. Yes, he's brilliant, but he's very annoying. However, you can't help but like him, faults and all. With Nancy Drew, the characters are just too cookie-cutter to be likable. They have no realism to them. I kept feeling like I was reading about those chipper, chirpy cartoon housewives you always see in vintage pictures. They cover all three hair colors -- blond, red, and brunette -- and all three girl types -- overly feminine and chubby, athletic and tom-boyish, and middle-of-the-road, girl-next-door. Boring. The conversation is horribly stilted. I've watched commercials with more meaningful dialogue. When the "boys" come along, first of all, they have nothing better to do than drop everything to partake in this mystery? They don't have lives or plans to speak of? Well, of course not, because college hasn't started yet. Until then, they just sit around and stare at each other. After college starts, don't expect them to drop as much as a line. All in all, everything is just so white-washed. It's like watching the Andy Griffith show except without adorable little Opie. SPOILERS. The biggest thing I don't get is the behavior of the other red-headed woman. She has lost her only children, her husband is dead, and she is so calm. If it were my children, I would have been INSANE. She casually stops in to buy a record from the local soda shop owner because she has time to think that he might need the business. Seriously? I would be fighting tooth and nail to get my children back, and I am willing to bet that most "normal" mothers would be a little more like a tiger whose cubs have been taken than a vaguely robust Stepford Wife. And then when she gets them back, after they've been ABUSED, all she has to say is, "Yes, I'm your mother, let me tell you all about it," and these traumatized children not only just wander peaceably back to the living room with her, but then it's like she missed them about as much as if they'd been in the next room all this time. There are no tears, there are no embraces, there is no movement and vigor. It's all just very calm and precise and proper. It's like she was possessed by Emily Post. And the next morning, she's not feverishly by the side of her children making sure they are okay (which I would be. . .I would be violently overprotective until I died), she's getting all giddy and silly over the prospect of a treasure! Your children are the treasure! I personally wouldn't be surprised to learn she was in on the scheme the whole time and is playing them for fools. What a creep fest. Secondly -- the action. Predictable. I know it's for children, but it's patronizingly predictable. Oh gee, you think there could be something sinister going on here? Oh no, Nancy, everything in the world is peaches and cream! You would use that metaphor, wouldn't you Bess? (But that's another barrel of fish altogether.) Sure, a young child probably wouldn't have been able to figure it out, but let's pretend for a moment that children excel when given the opportunity to be challenged and that a more complex plot-line still would have been okay. Yes, it picks up after a while, but it's very much a laundry list. They went here and then they went there and next they moved a little bit to the left which might be important but probably isn't. Which brings us to number three -- the inane amount of useless and mundane detail. I DON'T WANT TO KNOW WHAT THEY ATE FOR EVERY MEAL AND WHO SERVED IT. This may be almost unfathomable, but I DON'T CARE. This whole book is one giant laundry list of details all mushed together to very little effect. It should serve as a primer of what not to do with a novel. There was surprisingly little of actual value in the points that made up the plot. This kind of writing is not only infuriatingly dull but also just plain bad. I cannot count the number of times I rolled my eyes at lines like, "Nancy and Bess, although sympathetic, did not comment. They quickly purchased the items they needed, then said good-by and left" (pg. 45). Oh golly gee, I'm so glad to know that they actually bought the things they needed, rather than just staring at them and then leaving. . .and thank goodness I know they said goodbye! Otherwise, I might think they were rude! And why does every chapter need to end with an exclamation mark? Lastly -- poor Bess. The whole book, it just felt like the author and the other characters were pointing and chanting "fatty". They pointed out way too often that Bess would have two scoops of ice cream instead of one or that she is the one who insists upon a snack or that she really likes cookies. Good lord. We get it. She's chubby. It makes you feel better to look down on the fat girl. However, it does you no favors in my mind. Mid-life suicide, anyone, when Bess finally has enough and her last fifteen diets have all tanked and she's heavier than ever? Can you solve that one, Nancy? I know I must seem vitriolic in my review. Honestly, though, this book left a bad taste in my mouth. It's books like this that give older books a bad name. It's a purported "classic," but unlike classics that have actual literary merit, this one probably leaves most of its readers in the cold and with the notion that older books are terrible. Why on Earth there is such a huge number is beyond me. Not only does it highlight some of man's worst features while coating everything with a thick coat of white-wash mixed with a lot of sugar, the effect is singularly sinister because it all seems like a nightmarish situation where no one sees that anything is wrong. No, no, dear, it's definitely alright to make fun of the fat girl because we're all "laughing," for example. Peer pressure gone horribly wrong. I will be staying away from Nancy Drew in the future and will not be making a foray into The Hardy Boys, since they are written by the same type of people, if not the same ones exactly. P.S. If you want to read about a more realistic and enjoyable "girl detective" (and she's a "young sleuth"!), check out the Herculeah Jones novels by Betsy Byars. I'd choose those over these in a heartbeat.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    3.5 Stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ann♥♪♪♪♪

    Really cool cover and intriguing mystery (actually mysteries), with Nancy, Ned, George, Bess, Dave, and Burt. Several mysteries for them to solve in this one - including from a long time ago! Plenty of bravery and persistence for good in the book with them not letting bad people, as well as danger, stop them from doing the right things. I read the book with friends and that always adds to the fun. I mentioned on my blog what book I was currently reading and that got another friend's post about r Really cool cover and intriguing mystery (actually mysteries), with Nancy, Ned, George, Bess, Dave, and Burt. Several mysteries for them to solve in this one - including from a long time ago! Plenty of bravery and persistence for good in the book with them not letting bad people, as well as danger, stop them from doing the right things. I read the book with friends and that always adds to the fun. I mentioned on my blog what book I was currently reading and that got another friend's post about reading it, also. :) Read my entire review on Hardy and Drew Mysteries blog if you like https://hardyanddrewmysteries.wordpre...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    The appeal of Nancy Drew to me is that while some of the mysteries are slightly convoluted, there is no doubting Nancy's honesty and desire to help people. In this particular case, she unintentionally finds the source of her mystery before she even begins to investigate! Nancy, George and Bess are always on the case...especially when Nancy's father greets her with a mystery at breakfast! This is # 11 in the series and one I would recommend. Read Nancy Drew, "The Clue of the Broken Locket" as a b The appeal of Nancy Drew to me is that while some of the mysteries are slightly convoluted, there is no doubting Nancy's honesty and desire to help people. In this particular case, she unintentionally finds the source of her mystery before she even begins to investigate! Nancy, George and Bess are always on the case...especially when Nancy's father greets her with a mystery at breakfast! This is # 11 in the series and one I would recommend. Read Nancy Drew, "The Clue of the Broken Locket" as a break from those 500 page novels that never seem to end!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This installment is a bit messy - it felt like there were way too many things going on for a short book..... Ghost ships, kidnapping, ransacking, treasure hunting, child abuse, abduction, secret tunnels, record pirating, rock musicians etc. So while it was entertaining I feel like some of the side plots could have been dropped and more focus given to the main story ark.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    "The young sleuth smiled to herself. "I wish that phantom boat would appear! I'd like to know what it looks like." "'Oh boy, hot water!' Bess exclaimed. 'Time for a relaxing bath.' 'Not now,' George said. 'Sleuthing comes first.'"

  14. 4 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Music piracy, kidnapping, treasure hunting and iron flamingos. All are featured herein. A fun read between other books. #11 in my series read, but I've misplaced #10. Anyone seen it?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Keli

    Synopsis Girl Detective Nancy Drew and her friends explore a mystery that involves a hidden family fortune, pirated records and a ghostly apparition. Review Having never read any Nancy Drew mysteries, I was prepared to dislike this book. However chubby and girly Bess, her boyish cousin George and pragmatic and adventurous Nancy Drew won me over in the end. These girls are a little wholesome for a modern audience. However it never comes off as saccarine. Just that the girls have incredibly polite ma Synopsis Girl Detective Nancy Drew and her friends explore a mystery that involves a hidden family fortune, pirated records and a ghostly apparition. Review Having never read any Nancy Drew mysteries, I was prepared to dislike this book. However chubby and girly Bess, her boyish cousin George and pragmatic and adventurous Nancy Drew won me over in the end. These girls are a little wholesome for a modern audience. However it never comes off as saccarine. Just that the girls have incredibly polite manners--even as they're breaking and entering. And these well mannered girls are not afraid of a little mud or danger in order to get to the bottom of mystery. I can see that the formula and basic characters after several books. The beginning and end of the book referenced other titles in the series as in, "This as true from the time she had helped her father solve The Secret of the Old Clock..." However, the plot moves quickly enough and the mysteries are compelling enough to keep the reader engaged. Critical Reviews No reviews available. Other Bibliographic Information Published in 1934 by Simon & Schuster, Inc. Pages: 178 Ages: 8-12

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    This is the eleventh book in the Nancy Drew mystery series. The revised text version of the book covers the story of a group of guys who are pirating records, kidnapping people, and mistreating kids. The local police don't really have any respect for Nancy and she doesn't get much cooperation from them until near the end of the story. The story also involves inheritance and hidden treasure from the time of the Civil War. There's also a phantom ship, a sabotaged canoe, the broken locket, a hidden This is the eleventh book in the Nancy Drew mystery series. The revised text version of the book covers the story of a group of guys who are pirating records, kidnapping people, and mistreating kids. The local police don't really have any respect for Nancy and she doesn't get much cooperation from them until near the end of the story. The story also involves inheritance and hidden treasure from the time of the Civil War. There's also a phantom ship, a sabotaged canoe, the broken locket, a hidden passageway, and the usual assortment of thugs who will stop at nothing to get what they want. Nancy actually has to deal with several mysteries at the same time which makes things a little complicated for her. She again shows one of her strengths and that is the ability to do the necessary research to find out the history of the physical places involved in the mysteries. She also makes careful plans and has a very good way of tying clues together. Another good book in the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    One of the very first Nancy Drew books that I ever read, and therefore one of my favorites.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I still love these books I read as a kid!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    The broken locket is my favorite Nancy Drew

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Nancy and the gang do some sleuthing, stop to go to church, do some more sleuthing, Bess talks about food, Nancy gets kidnapped. It's all thrilling, wholesome excitement!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Typical Nancy Drew mystery. Good story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    MysteryReaderLee

    This Nancy Drew book was interesting and exciting, especially when the phantom boat would appear on the river. I enjoyed reading this one too!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    My first Nancy Drew! This was fun. Not a sophisticated mystery; it was full of unlikely coincidences, but I enjoyed it anyway. I can see why Nancy Drew is an engaging heroine, with her cheerful independence, her spiffy roadster, and her indulgent father. This was a fun escape, and I’ll probably pick up more of these as fun comfort reads!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    A thrilling mystery with a lot of bumped heads and threats issued. I'm always interested when a doppelganger turns out to be better than secret twins, and this plot is more complex than most involving look-alikes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Iz

    legitimately pretty scary, and wove together two very unexpected things

  26. 5 out of 5

    Destiny Martinez

    This book is okay but the thing is that I didn't really understand it well. It was too confusing and I think this book was a little too hard for me. This book is good but I don't think it's for me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily W

    When I was a mere 12 year old, The Clue of the Broken Locket was the first Nancy Drew book I ever read. It was the same year that the Nancy Drew movie (starring Emma Roberts) came out - and I was hooked on Nancy. Now, seven years later, I have re-read my very first Nancy Drew book. And I found it to be, well, all a little bit ridiculous really. The clues! which all happen to tie in with the mystery (does she ever find anything irrelevant?) The cliffhangers! at the end of EVERY SINGLE CHAPTER! The c When I was a mere 12 year old, The Clue of the Broken Locket was the first Nancy Drew book I ever read. It was the same year that the Nancy Drew movie (starring Emma Roberts) came out - and I was hooked on Nancy. Now, seven years later, I have re-read my very first Nancy Drew book. And I found it to be, well, all a little bit ridiculous really. The clues! which all happen to tie in with the mystery (does she ever find anything irrelevant?) The cliffhangers! at the end of EVERY SINGLE CHAPTER! The concatenation! what are the odds that all these mysteries are all connected?! The eavesdropping! in which our detectives manage to tie up all loose ends because the antagonists happen to discuss every single detail of their dastardly plans! and how can we forget... the self-promotion! "Nancy began to wonder when another mystery would come her way. She was to find out soon, upon discovering The Message in the Hollow Oak" If you're a preteen/early teen, by all means, go ahead and read these books! You'll probably find them highly enjoyable (just as I did at that age). But as for me, this will probably be the last I read of Nancy Drew. If you want some light Nancy Drew themed entertainment, enjoy these Kate Beaton comics! http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php... http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php... http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php... http://www.harkavagrant.com/index.php...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    When I was nine, I picked this book up out of boredom during an extended stay at my grandparents’ house. Browsing through my granddad’s old library of massive historical volumes and other classics, I found that this it was the only book anywhere close to my comprehension level. As soon as I started reading it, I immediately became engrossed in the quaint old-fashioned mystery (whose plot I now have entirely forgotten), and stayed up late that night to finish it. My captivation with this book may When I was nine, I picked this book up out of boredom during an extended stay at my grandparents’ house. Browsing through my granddad’s old library of massive historical volumes and other classics, I found that this it was the only book anywhere close to my comprehension level. As soon as I started reading it, I immediately became engrossed in the quaint old-fashioned mystery (whose plot I now have entirely forgotten), and stayed up late that night to finish it. My captivation with this book may have been heightened by the extent of the boredom that I was trying to cure. So this book probably has much more of a sentimental rather than literary value to me, reminding me of the good-ole days at my grandparents’.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This one is between three and four stars for me, but I rounded up because overall it was an enjoyable read and for me seemed better than the last couple of the Nancy Drew books that I (re)read. It is a typical Nancy Drew book, with all its expected 'well isn't that a coincidence' moments. But, Nancy seemed much less codependent in this one, and showed a bit of restraint before jumping and and trying to solve everyone's lives for them (along with the actual mysteries). p.s. despite what is claimed This one is between three and four stars for me, but I rounded up because overall it was an enjoyable read and for me seemed better than the last couple of the Nancy Drew books that I (re)read. It is a typical Nancy Drew book, with all its expected 'well isn't that a coincidence' moments. But, Nancy seemed much less codependent in this one, and showed a bit of restraint before jumping and and trying to solve everyone's lives for them (along with the actual mysteries). p.s. despite what is claimed in the book, it is impossible to have identical boy-girl twins. Boy-girl twins are always fraternal (when talking about biological sex, as the book was, rather than gender, of course).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dane

    This was one of my favorite Nancy Drew books when I was a kid. It doesn't quite hold up in the same way for me - it was never going to - but it brought back lots of fun memories of how rapt I used to be reading this.

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